Upgrade to Chess.com Premium!

Leningrad Dutch books


  • 4 years ago · Quote · #1

    Wouter_Remmerswaal

    Hi everyone,

    I'm busy with adapting the Leningrad Dutch in my repetoir.
    Unfortunately the books available to me in the Netherlands is slightly limited.
    Has anyone here tried "Play the Dutch" by Neil McDonald or "Understanding the Leningrad Dutch" by Valeri Beim?

    There does not seem to be much reviews about these titles.

    Any other titles that are great are also welcome. I can check if they are available here.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #2

    furtivamente

    Have you heard of The Leningrad System by Stefan Kindermann? Reviews I've read say it is good.

    P.S I haven't read any Dutch book myself, but I play Dutch, especially if not exclusively Leningrad quite frequently.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #3

    Wouter_Remmerswaal

    furtivamente wrote:

    Have you heard of The Leningrad System by Stefan Kindermann? Reviews I've read say it is good.

    P.S I haven't read any Dutch book myself, but I play Dutch, especially if not exclusively Leningrad quite frequently.


    I hadn't heard about it. But thanks a lot for the suggestion!
    Money is tight at the moment so I'm trying to make sure that if I buy a chess book I really use it. And that book is even available for lending at the library.

    Any personal experiences with Leningrad/dutch books?

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #4

    BigTy

    I have Leningrad System and it is quite good; probably all you will ever need if you want to play 7...Qe8 in the Leningrad mainline.

    I have heard good things about Beim's book. I believe it covers 7...Qe8 and 7...c6 in the mainline, but not 7...Nc6. If my memory is correct, it is not a repertoire book, so the coverage is more comprehensive, but less indepth in certain variations than the other books. Repertoire books tend to be biased though, so maybe this book would be a good place to start.

    According to the chesspublishing forums, McDonalds book is not very good. I heard that he misses some very critical lines in the slightly dubious 7...Nc6 variation that he recommends. This seems to be a common problem with everyman chess repertoire books; they often miss critical lines and give the reader the false impression that the opening is invincible. McDonald is a good author though, and if this book is like other everyman books I would be willing to bet that the explanations are quite good. He recommends 7...Nc6 and 7...c6 in the mainline I believe.

    I guess the choice comes down to what lines you want to play. You cannot really go wrong with Kindermann's book, though you may find the depth of analysis to be much more than you need.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #5

    Wouter_Remmerswaal

    BigTy wrote:

    I have Leningrad System and it is quite good; probably all you will ever need if you want to play 7...Qe8 in the Leningrad mainline.

    I have heard good things about Beim's book. I believe it covers 7...Qe8 and 7...c6 in the mainline, but not 7...Nc6. If my memory is correct, it is not a repertoire book, so the coverage is more comprehensive, but less indepth in certain variations than the other books. Repertoire books tend to be biased though, so maybe this book would be a good place to start.

    According to the chesspublishing forums, McDonalds book is not very good. I heard that he misses some very critical lines in the slightly dubious 7...Nc6 variation that he recommends. This seems to be a common problem with everyman chess repertoire books; they often miss critical lines and give the reader the false impression that the opening is invincible. McDonald is a good author though, and if this book is like other everyman books I would be willing to bet that the explanations are quite good. He recommends 7...Nc6 and 7...c6 in the mainline I believe.

    I guess the choice comes down to what lines you want to play. You cannot really go wrong with Kindermann's book, though you may find the depth of analysis to be much more than you need.


    Thank you for your opinions the books.
    Well I actually like to play the Qe8 move. I will try the Kindermann book!

    As long all the lines are coverd I say the more and deeper the analysis the better. I can always quit half way trough the analysis, so I rather have the choice to quite myself then to be forced to quite because the analysis end after the tenth move.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #6

    furtivamente

    Nope, no experience, although I would love to get a hand on one. Preferably the Leningrad System. I've been searching for a REALLY good deal in the internet but haven't been able to find one. It's good to hear that you can find it in nearby library.

    I mostly search internet articles on Dutch and some of my opening repertoires are memorized from Opening Explorer. After that I'm on my own.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #7

    Don3

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 4 years ago · Quote · #8

    Wouter_Remmerswaal

    furtivamente wrote:

    Nope, no experience, although I would love to get a hand on one. Preferably the Leningrad System. I've been searching for a REALLY good deal in the internet but haven't been able to find one. It's good to hear that you can find it in nearby library.

    I mostly search internet articles on Dutch and some of my opening repertoires are memorized from Opening Explorer. After that I'm on my own.


    That's a shame. Well I didn't get it from our public librabry, I "orderd" it from the Royal Library. Our Royal Library has a great deal of chess books.

    Don3 wrote:

    Hey,man dont spend money! Many people don't know but the book :(Understanding the Leningrad Dutch" by Valeri Beim) is available for download at the following link.Just scroll down with your mouse a bit and there you will find 2 options which will say "high speed download" and "free download". Select the latter and enjoy!!!.Here is the link:

    http://www.filesonic.in/file/46579490/Beim,%20Valeri%20-%20Understanding%20the%20Leningrad%20Dutch%20pdf


    Chess Books are very difficult to use on a computer. Since it would require you to keep turning around to make moves on a chess board. Not to mention that reading from a book is much more pleasant. And since I can get a copy from my library it's just as free! But thank you for the link, and I'm sure this can be of help for furtivamente!

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #9

    SchachMatt

    I have "Play the Dutch" by McDonald, which is great, but I have heard the Kindermann book is better for hte Leningrag, while Play the Dutch is more of an overview

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #10

    bAdSPaSskY

    I have Beim's book and it is excellent. I am not a Dutch player, however, so I can't be 100% sure it has all you need. Based on reading other forums, though, the consensus is indeed that it's the best Leningrad book (I have not seen Kindermann's, though, and he tends to be very good as well).

    McDonald's book has some serious flaws; his main line was basically busted shortly after publication!

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #11

    Wouter_Remmerswaal

    That's a shame about McDonald's book.

    Monday I'll pick up the Kindermann's book, I hope it is pretty good.


    By the way, I also had heard good about the book "The Dutch for the Attacking Player" by Steffen Pedersen.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #12

    Wouter_Remmerswaal

    Thanks for you suggestion!

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #13

    Don3

    [COMMENT DELETED]

Back to Top

Post your reply: