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Let's Play: Rank the Bad Opening!


  • 22 months ago · Quote · #81

    TetsuoShima

    i mean so bad that they are absolutly not playable

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #82

    Irontiger

    TetsuoShima wrote:

    and yeah the albins countergambit it might be bad i dont know, but its fun if white plays badly you look like a genius. 

    This is exactly the reason of all the openings mentioned, and also the reason why you should not play them.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #83

    TetsuoShima

    but i dont think albins countergambit is that easy to refute. 

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #84

    TetsuoShima

    but anyway even if it is, i just like the crazyness of it, even if its bad it is at least somehow very imaginativ in my opinion.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #85

    -BEES-

    5.a3 is pretty easy to remember. I won't call it a refutation. It's not outright won for White yet, but it sucks a lot of fun out of the Albin for Black.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #86

    TetsuoShima

    -BEES- wrote:

    5.a3 is pretty easy to remember. I won't call it a refutation. It's not outright won for White yet, but it sucks a lot of fun out of the Albin for Black.

    well i heard an im say he hates the albin and has problems with it. I cant imagine he would not remember a3 on move 5.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #87

    TetsuoShima

    not to mention the im that plays the albin against him in a tournament...

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #88

    TetsuoShima

    but yeah maybe you are right, just because some are ims they ofc can still be incorrect sometimes. i havent checked it and i dont play it myself. 

    I just like the idea of the opening because it seems so counter intuitive to play that moves. I mean seriously, when would you ever come up with such moves?? i

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #89

    The_logicalist245

    For ranking these openings from worst to playable:

    1.Englund Gambit (Horrible)

    2.Halloween Gambit (Terrible)

    3.Cochrane Gambit (Unfathomable)

    4.Parham Attack (Good for schoolkids...)

    5.Albin Gambit (Played it once and got a really interesting game out of it)

    6.Budapest Gambit (I believe this is played most in professional games)

    7.Traxler Counter gambit (I've personally won loads of games with this)

    But what about weird openings such as the Sodium attack and Van't Krujis Bouncing Bishop opening? I believe that can be easily countered.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #90

    -BEES-

    So... assuming Black plays maybe 6.Bd6 instead of that blunder, Black's better developed. White's Queen is out of the action and his other pieces are doing nothing. Meanwhile Black's bishops are activated, his knights are out, his rook can be placed on the f-file. He's ready to rock and roll. And white has to spend further moves just to keep his queen from being lost.

    I don't know much about this opening though. Maybe White can answer all of those challenges, and is in fact won. Regardless, I don't think Black will give White a chance to ever play this opening, because 2...d5 has surely got to be better than 2...b5, kicking away the bishop and taking the center.

    It's a clever attack, and the principle behind it appears in other openings like the Queen's gambit or the old Benoni--if someone tries to take that c pawn and hang on to it, they could lose a rook. If you want to try a really offbeat out-there opening you could give the Orangutan a look.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #91

    melvinbluestone

    Why would white play 1.e3? Check any DB and you'll be hard pressed to find a reply for black that doesn't score better. I mean, we're talking the first move here, and black is statistically better with about half a dozen choices!? Still, the move does have it's adherents. And on the club level, it usually transposes to something like an English or even Bird's Opening. So white can do ok with it. But trying 1.e3 in the hopes that your opponent finds the lemon 2...b5 is ridiculous.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #92

    TetsuoShima

    now you kidding,  you cant seriously say e3 is a bad move, you still could play d4 afterwards or f4 or even as you mentioned c4.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #93

    Oran_perrett

    e3 as a first move is definitely bad, look at the databases, as a second or third move or whatever it's fine but as a first it's too passive

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #94

    melvinbluestone

    TetsuoShima wrote:

    now you kidding,  you cant seriously say e3 is a bad move, you still could play d4 afterwards or f4 or even as you mentioned c4.

    I didn't say it's a bad move....... but then again, I didn't say it's a good move, either. I just think it's questionable as a first move. But it does transpose rather easily to a lot of other lines, so most of the times I guess white can do alright with it. Maybe it's good for unnerving an opponent, or fool them into thinking you've gone crazy. Hey, whatever works!

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #95

    Irontiger

    1.e3 is a bad move, especially if you intend to play 2.d4 whatever your opponent plays, why not play 1.d4 ? At least you haven't trapped your Bc1.

    Maybe not as bad as 1.f3, but still bad.

    Against 1.e3 I simply answer 1...d5 and let my opponent wonder why he has played this move :

    After 2.d4 the position is the same as 1.d4 d5 2.e3 but none sane would play 2.e3 in that line.

    After 2.c4, already 2...dxc4 3.Bxc4 e5 is a good game for Black.

    After 2.f4 (maybe the best from the first move), Black has to be careful not to be overambitious in the center or he falls back in the lines of the Dutch with one less tempo, but otherwise he is fine. For instance ...Nf6, ...g6 and ...Bg7 and if White stonewalls by d4 just jump at the outpost e4.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #96

    TetsuoShima

    irontiger i think im missing something, yeah it might be pretty embaressing to ask but i do it anyway. wouldnt 2 e3 just transpose later to other regular d4 lines or can black really take advantage of that move?

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #97

    Irontiger

    TetsuoShima wrote:

    irontiger i think im missing something, yeah it might be pretty embaressing to ask but i do it anyway. wouldnt 2 e3 just transpose later to other regular d4 lines or can black really take advantage of that move?

    No, it does not transpose, because your bishop on c1 is now blocked by the pawn. You won't be able to play it to g5 for instance (his usual square in the 1.d4 d5 games). So yes, Black can take advantadge of it. Maybe the game is just equal after that, but White who has problems with his bishop instead of White in the regular lines, so it is much easier to play for Black.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #98

    TetsuoShima

    yes you are right i totally forgot bishop g5, but i guess there are also lines without it and e4 will be played later anyway

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #99

    TetsuoShima

    im just asking out curiosity now, i totally forgot about bishop g5 but i imagine an entire openings as big as those d4 openings would not necessarily depend on that move to be played with advantage, even so ofc bishop g5 helps e4 i guess.

    anway thanks for the help

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #100

    Irontiger

    TetsuoShima wrote:

    yes you are right i totally forgot bishop g5, but i guess there are also lines without it and e4 will be played later anyway

    You really have seen e4 played before the endgame in many games that began by 1.d4 d5 ? Not me. And anyways, if ever you want to play the pawn on e4, why do it in two moves (e2-e3 and then e3-e4) ?

    I agree trapping the bishop is not so terrible, and there are ways around. But that totally ruins the first move advantadge, at least. It is not because it is tiny that you should renounce to it as soon as move 2 when you can do otherwise.


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