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Old Benoni


  • 4 years ago · Quote · #1

    TheKhan

    New back to chess and first time student of the game (less than a year on both counts), I am trying to develop both opening knowledge and an opening repertoire. I have been experimenting with gambits of bishops pawns (KG as white, for example) and thinking hard about how to parlay this general understanding to black responses to d4. So here is an Old Benoni game I tried and I think highlights some of the dangers for white in accepting the offered queen's bishop's pawn instead of an 2. e5. My general impression is that the lead in dev is significant (just look at lines 5-10). the opportuity to prevent white castling were a nice bonus, but does this come up often? I am playing against a player who is rated bettwr than I by >100, but am even with on games (better lucky than good). Thoughts? Has anyone used old Benoni or Benko much?

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #2

    Estragon

    White was clueless.  2 d5 should lead to an easy advantage for him.

    The defect of the Old Benoni move order is that White hasn't played c2-c4, and can just omit that move and play Nc3 directly, effectively gaining a full tempo in development which makes Black's position very difficult.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #3

    AnthonyCG

    Nowadays Black will stall with 1...Nf6, 2...e6 and only then play 3...c5.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #4

    TheKhan

    Estragon wrote:

    White was clueless.  2 d5 should lead to an easy advantage for him.

    The defect of the Old Benoni move order is that White hasn't played c2-c4, and can just omit that move and play Nc3 directly, effectively gaining a full tempo in development which makes Black's position very difficult.


    I agree that d5 negates the usefulness of 1. ...c5. I guess it only works well if white 2. xc5. On the other hand, 2. d5 does complicate things. In fact, I'll have to check if I have ever won with 2. d5 as black, but my record with 2. xc5 is solid.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #5

    AnthonyCG

    TheKhan wrote:
    Estragon wrote:

    White was clueless.  2 d5 should lead to an easy advantage for him.

    The defect of the Old Benoni move order is that White hasn't played c2-c4, and can just omit that move and play Nc3 directly, effectively gaining a full tempo in development which makes Black's position very difficult.


    I agree that d5 negates the usefulness of 1. ...c5. I guess it only works well if white 2. xc5. On the other hand, 2. d5 does complicate things. In fact, I'll have to check if I have ever won with 2. d5 as black, but my record with 2. xc5 is solid.


    Don't expect that to change lol.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #6

    Estragon

    You should understand that 2 d5 isn't a brilliant idea of my own, it is the main theoretical response to 1...c5.  The only people who will play 2 dxc5 are those with no familiarity with the opening at all, which limits the field to beginners and those very much lacking in both skill and experience.

    As Anthony CG pointed out, Black usually "back-doors" into the Modern Benoni these days, playing ...c5 only after 1 d4 Nf6  2 c4 e6  3 Nf3, avoiding all the nasty stuff with f2-f4 that drove the defense into obscurity for years.  Of course, he must be prepared to play the Nimzoindian or Orthodox QGD in the event of 3 Nc3, or the Catalan if 3 g3.

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #7

    wackwow

    After dxc5 e6


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