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Picking up the Sicilian Najdorf. Can anyone list some variations?


  • 22 months ago · Quote · #21

    Vyomo

    Sicilian Najdorf, this is the main line



  • 22 months ago · Quote · #22

    thehedgehog2000

    Heidrich wrote:

    My teacher told me to pick up the Najdorf and to do some pre studying. So far i know i wont always get the open sicilian so ive studied for some of the main non open lines for instance, Grand prix attack, 2. c3 sicilian, and a few other 2.Nc3 closed side lines. What other non open sicilian lines do i have to study that are fairly common? As for Najdorf itself ive done some extensive studying into the Old mainline of 6.Bg5 and the English attack.Oh ive also studied the morra. What lines am i missing? 

    you have to prepare for the 2.g3 sicilian but honestly you'll never end up getting into it. You also should prepare for 1.e4 1...c5 2.Nf3 2...d6 3.Bc4

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #23

    bobyyyy

    "I would not want to play the najdorf unless I was 1800+."

    That's a very strange thing to say. Even beginners should play the Narjdorf no matter how many times their king is wiped off the board. They can study their losses and learn plenty.

    The best advice about chess I ever got was when somebody said "never give up the Najdorf." I kept at it, losing quite a bit, but now I fear nobody if I have the black side of the Najdorf.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #24

    AndyClifton

    lol at #22 ("the main line")

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #25

    Metaknight251

    well, I certainly would not want to play that (post 22)!  Way to crazy!  I'm not lev polugaevsky lol.  Also....  Post 22. says that the poisoned pawn is only for Masters and computers, and follows by recommending the polugaevsky?!

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #26

    jposthuma

    Bg5 is out of style now, anyways. I'm a dragon player, but I went through a phase of playing the najdorf. After getting crushed by my coach in that line like 20 times in a row without even putting up a fight, I gave it up. I prefer the dragon, where the plans are more clear.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #27

    jposthuma

    I jsut looked up the theory to that one line in post 22, and was not surprized at all. The opening is nonsense. If you ever want to play this against somebody more than 200 rating points less than you, or over 1600 USCF, you're going to end up in a lot of trouble very quickly. Of course, the opposite will be true if you play against weak opponents.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #28

    Expertise87

    I strongly recommend taking your focus on memorization and using it to learn more tactical patterns than your brain has room for. Then you'll break 2000 and can study openings, when you are actually more likely to get into them. You won't see many actual Najdorf's at your level, and when you do you are much more likely to lose after going out of theory because your opponent will have better development and easier attacks.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #29

    AndyClifton

    jposthuma wrote:

    I jsut looked up the theory to that one line in post 22, and was not surprized at all. The opening is nonsense. 

    Yeah, that Polugaevsky guy was a real goof.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #30

    Vyomo

    Nonsense? Are you out of your mind or what!

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #31

    Estragon

    There was a time when more than a quarter of the games in master tournaments were Nadjorf Sicilians.  Back in the early 70s, of course there were far fewer tournaments then, but that's how popular it was.  We didn't have internet, you might see a few games three months later in Chess Life or be able to buy a cheaply produced "tournament book" with just the game scores (less than what a decent bulletin is) from Chess Digest six months later.  For minor tournaments, you never saw the games, the ideas might be found by stronger players and filter up.

    The Nadjorf is one of the richest openings in chess.  There are many options for both sides which lead to entirely different sorts of game, from positional struggles to tactical firefights.

    But as IM pfren noted, you need to have a firm foundation to enter these troubled waters, beginning canoers should not attempt the high classes of rapids.  It does you no more good to try to learn the Nadjorf before you are ready than it does to take calculus before you have learned algebra.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #32

    transpo

    Heidrich wrote:

    My teacher told me to pick up the Najdorf and to do some pre studying. So far i know i wont always get the open sicilian so ive studied for some of the main non open lines for instance, Grand prix attack, 2. c3 sicilian, and a few other 2.Nc3 closed side lines. What other non open sicilian lines do i have to study that are fairly common? As for Najdorf itself ive done some extensive studying into the Old mainline of 6.Bg5 and the English attack.Oh ive also studied the morra. What lines am i missing? 

    What other non open sicilian lines do i have to study that are fairly common?


    You need to know the g3 line: 1.e4 c5 2.g3 or 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.g3 (there are alot of transpositions from this line into Nc3 Closed Sicilian, Grand Prix Attack, and c3 Sicilian.

    What lines am i missing?

    You need to know the following 2 anti-Sicilians

    Moscow: 1.e4 c5 2.Bb5+

    Rossolimo: 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.Bb5+

    You can combine,"... also studied the morra...." and the "...2.c3 Sicilian..." by studying the Alapin 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.c3 Nf6.  With the Smith-Morra the move order is usually 1.e4 c5 2.d4 cxd4 3.c3 Nf6.

    As for Najdorf itself ive done some extensive studying into the Old mainline of 6.Bg5

    After 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Bg5 e6 7.f4 Qb6 (the Poisoned Pawn Variation) I know 400 variations 35-40 moves deep cold.

    and the English attack.

    After 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Be3 e6 you also need to know 7.g4 (The Perenyi Attack- the little brother of the Keres Attack in the Scheveningen)  Also I would recommend studying a book titled, "Play the Najdorf/Scheveningen Style"

    In addition I would recommend that you purchase GM John Nunn's 2 books:

    The Complete Najdorf:  Modern Lines

    The Complete Najdorf:  6.Bg5

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #33

    Expertise87

    Nunn's books are full of errors. For a serious player I would recommend Ftacnik's book from Grandmaster Repertoire, but these books are not appropriate for players under master level.

    The Moscow is 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.Bb5+ and the Rossolimo comes from 2...Nc6 so you wouldn't have to know it, 1.e4 c5 2.Bb5 is not check and not threatening as Black can just play 2...a6.

    Estragon, it is spelled 'Najdorf,' not 'Nadjorf' as you wrote it every time in your post.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #34

    Vyomo

    You should probably know the Wing Gambit as well. I play it occasionally, and it is sound.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #35

    Expertise87

    Yes, studying the 11th most popular second move is a fantastic use of your time.


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