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queen's gambit


  • 6 years ago · Quote · #1

    junbalbin

    i am a chess fan and my three sons. one of them plays the queen's gambit opening.

    Now a days i rarely see it being used in top caliber tournament.

    Nonetheless i wanted to help my son to best maximize the said opening for him to be at his best in case he will be using it.

    If anyone can contribute his ideas on the dynamics of the opening.

    How to porperly play it, its main idea, its attacking points, weaknesses and points to consider.

    I will be very glad to know from you chess lovers thanks.

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #2

    dmeng

    There are some really good books on the Queen's Gambit. Unlike the King's Gambit, the Queen's Gambit does not expose the king to attack early in the game.

    Also, the Queen's Gambit is definitely still played in top-level tournaments. So far, Bilbao 2008 (a category 22!) has 3 games with Queen's Gambit Declined and 1 Queen's Gambit Accepted.

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #3

    srn347

    I suggest ressurecting the move e4 after it is accepted.

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #4

    brettwith2ts

    Also, in the Accepted, there's an old trap to look out for:

    1)d4, d5 2)c4, dxc4 3)e3 which threatens to win back the pawn immediately.  Black is best to let white have the pawn back, b/c if he tries to defend:

    3)...b5, 4)a4, c6 (obviously, 4)...bxa4 is bad) 5)axb4, cxb4 6)Qf3, winning a piece.  I don't know how old or how advanced your son is, but I've seen many amateurs fall for that trap as black, so you might want to run through it a couple of times with him. 

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #5

    srn347

    Replace c6 with Bd7 and the pawn is held onto. Also, if the albin countergambit instead of accepted(e5 dxe5 d4) don't play e3, you get the lasker trap on you if you do that. I would suggest e4.

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #6

    brettwith2ts

    srn347 wrote:

    Replace c6 with Bd7 and the pawn is held onto. Also, if the albin countergambit instead of accepted(e5 dxe5 d4) don't play e3, you get the lasker trap on you if you do that. I would suggest e4.


    Bd7 holds on to the pawn better, it's true, but 5)axb5, Bxb5 6)Nc3, c6, 7)b3, and I think white has slightly better chances.  Black would do better to avoid the whole line with 3)Nf6, for example, rather than trying to hold on to the pawn.

    I can see, however, that I might not have been clear enough; I don't recommend e3.   What I was trying (clumsily) to get at is this:  if you (or your son, in this case) plays the QGA as black as well, he should be familiar with that trap, so he knows not to fall into it.  One of the first things I do when I'm teaching someone an opening, is I show them all of the beginner's traps a few times, so they know what NOT to do.  As far as responding to the QGA w/ white, either e4 or Nf3 is great.  I play both.

    Sorry if I caused any confusion.  ;-)

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #7

    junbalbin

    brettwith2ts wrote:

    Also, in the Accepted, there's an old trap to look out for:

    1)d4, d5 2)c4, dxc4 3)e3 which threatens to win back the pawn immediately.  Black is best to let white have the pawn back, b/c if he tries to defend:

    3)...b5, 4)a4, c6 (obviously, 4)...bxa4 is bad) 5)axb4, cxb4 6)Qf3, winning a piece.  I don't know how old or how advanced your son is, but I've seen many amateurs fall for that trap as black, so you might want to run through it a couple of times with him. 


    ok sir i will inform my kid. he is already 14 years old and in one year time he will be entering college and i wanted him to be in their school varsity because of my limited financial means. i will let him read and review your advice sir thanks

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #8

    junbalbin

    dmeng wrote:

    There are some really good books on the Queen's Gambit. Unlike the King's Gambit, the Queen's Gambit does not expose the king to attack early in the game.

    Also, the Queen's Gambit is definitely still played in top-level tournaments. So far, Bilbao 2008 (a category 22!) has 3 games with Queen's Gambit Declined and 1 Queen's Gambit Accepted.


    ok sir unfortunately we have limited books available in country area. we live in a rural area or countryside in the philippines and i have also limited resources to purchase in case their are available its too expensive here

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #9

    junbalbin

    srn347 wrote:

    Replace c6 with Bd7 and the pawn is held onto. Also, if the albin countergambit instead of accepted(e5 dxe5 d4) don't play e3, you get the lasker trap on you if you do that. I would suggest e4.


    ok sir but how is the lasker trap??? i am not familiar with it. if you have time please show it thanks

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #10

    junbalbin

    brettwith2ts wrote:

    srn347 wrote:

    Replace c6 with Bd7 and the pawn is held onto. Also, if the albin countergambit instead of accepted(e5 dxe5 d4) don't play e3, you get the lasker trap on you if you do that. I would suggest e4.


    Bd7 holds on to the pawn better, it's true, but 5)axb5, Bxb5 6)Nc3, c6, 7)b3, and I think white has slightly better chances.  Black would do better to avoid the whole line with 3)Nf6, for example, rather than trying to hold on to the pawn.

    I can see, however, that I might not have been clear enough; I don't recommend e3.   What I was trying (clumsily) to get at is this:  if you (or your son, in this case) plays the QGA as black as well, he should be familiar with that trap, so he knows not to fall into it.  One of the first things I do when I'm teaching someone an opening, is I show them all of the beginner's traps a few times, so they know what NOT to do.  As far as responding to the QGA w/ white, either e4 or Nf3 is great.  I play both.

    Sorry if I caused any confusion.  ;-)


    ok sir i will print out yr comment for him to read and review over the board

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #11

    trqglqdyte

    I would say if he wants to play this opening, to play around with how to get the pawn back after 2.c4 dxc if black attempts to hold onto it.  It will lead to some interesting ideas he should remember when playing this opening.

    this is the lasker trap...

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cKXMzdu7ix0


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