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Queenside Fianchetto


  • 6 years ago · Quote · #1

    TAGLARRY

         I like the Queenside Fianchetto but I rarely see it played.  It really seems to work well against players in the 1200 to 1500 level.  It is amazing how many players forget about that bishop until it comes up the long diagonal and takes out the rook.  When I use it against higher level opponents, it tends not to work so well. I also like how it keeps my paws more tightly grouped so they can support each other.

         I like to start out with a Queenside Fianchetto, then develop the Knights, then E3 to open up for the Queen and the white squared bishop.

         Anyone else like to use a Fianchetto?  Any other suggestions after the Fianchetto is played?

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #2

    TheSushiBoy

    TAGLARRY wrote:

         I like the Queenside Fianchetto but I rarely see it played.  It really seems to work well against players in the 1200 to 1500 level.  It is amazing how many players forget about that bishop until it comes up the long diagonal and takes out the rook.  When I use it against higher level opponents, it tends not to work so well. I also like how it keeps my paws more tightly grouped so they can support each other.

         I like to start out with a Queenside Fianchetto, then develop the Knights, then E3 to open up for the Queen and the white squared bishop.

         Anyone else like to use a Fianchetto?  Any other suggestions after the Fianchetto is played?


    I like the fianchetto on Kingside that develops from the Kings Indian Attack/Defense.  I rarely use the attack, but I love the Indian defense when my opponent opens queenside.   Sometimes my knight ends up in a nasty pin to my bishop.  If I watch for it I can usually avoid that pin and get my knight activated with out having to rely on my king to protect the kingside bishop.

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #3

    Howie33

    I like to play the king's indian, which uses Fianchetto on the king side.. it tends to work pretty good for me.

     

     

     

     

     

     

    This is typically how i see it played... There are a lot more variations to it, but this is the most common

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #4

    Odie_Spud

    1.b3 is called the Larsen Opening named after Danish GM Bent Larsen who used to play it a lot. It went through a brief period of popularity in the early 70’s but then fell out of favor.

    Generally Black will meet it with 1...e5 trying to limit the scope of the B. Typical play might be 2.Bb2 Nc6 3.e3 d5 4.Bb5 Bd6 5.f4

    Another popular way to meet it is: 1...d5. In that case the usual move is 2.Nf3 which often transposes into a Reversed Nimzo-Indian

    Black can also play 1...Nf6, 1...c5, 1...f5, 1...e6, 1...c6, 1...b6, or even 1...b5.

    It allows Black a lot of options so to play it correctly you should be pretty familiar with a lot of different formations.


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