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Sicilian Counter, is it possible?


  • 5 years ago · Quote · #1

    zomgep

    I often enjoy playing e-pawn games against my opponent as white since I generally know most of the lines and correct moves. Of course, I reach despair as 1. e4, c5 arises. I've tried the morra smith gambit, but it hasn't given me the results I desire. Is there any other solid counter against the Sicilian without enormous chess theory??

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #2

    rich

    Normally it goes like this, e4, c5, Nf3, Nc6, d4, cxd4, Nxd4, Qc7.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #3

    cyarstl-mteh

    Alapin    1.e4...c5   2.c3          I like playing it very solid and less theory than open sicilian

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #4

    ericmittens

    The alapin with 2.c3 and the Bb5+ systems are generally regarded as the best of the anti-sicilians. The grand-prix attack can lead to some interesting positions as well. Of course I would always recommend playing the open. Laughing

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #5

    pvmike

    There are alot of anti-sicilian lines, the morra-smith, the grand-prix attack, c3 sicilian, wing gambit, and the 3.Bb5 sicilian(I can't remember the name). I personally like the morra-smith, I know you said you didn't like that. But it's leads to open postions involving alot of tactics and should help you to improve your attacking ability.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #6

    shakmatnykov

    cyarstl-mteh wrote:

    Alapin    1.e4...c5   2.c3          I like playing it very solid and less theory than open sicilian


     On the other hand,there are many transpositions to other openings.

    So many,in fact,that if you play it too often you might even begin to transpose the letters in your own name. 

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #7

    KillaBeez

    ericmittens wrote:

    The alapin with 2.c3 and the Bb5+ systems are generally regarded as the best of the anti-sicilians. The grand-prix attack can lead to some interesting positions as well. Of course I would always recommend playing the open. 


     I also think the Closed Sicilian ranks right up there with c3 and Bb5+.  It gives a fairly equal position, but one in which the better player will win.  Being familiar with the ideas gives the White player a head start

    Although, I'd recommend the Open too.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #8

    ericmittens

    KillaBeez wrote:
    ericmittens wrote:

    The alapin with 2.c3 and the Bb5+ systems are generally regarded as the best of the anti-sicilians. The grand-prix attack can lead to some interesting positions as well. Of course I would always recommend playing the open. 


     I also think the Closed Sicilian ranks right up there with c3 and Bb5+.  It gives a fairly equal position, but one in which the better player will win.  Being familiar with the ideas gives the White player a head start

    Although, I'd recommend the Open too.


    Oh I dunno, I've always had a very easy time with the closed sicilian. It's playable of course, but in my opinion the alapin and Bb5 stuff (and sometimes the grand-prix with Bb5) lead to more interesting positions.

    Of course it's all just personal preference...

    The Rossolimo has always been the healthiest anti-sicilian from a theoretical point of view as far as I know.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #9

    Scarblac

    zomgep wrote:

    Is there any other solid counter against the Sicilian without enormous chess theory??


     2.b3 is sort of decent and doesn't have that much theory about it yet.

    Otherwise... the Sicilian is the most popular opening in chess. Of course there is a lot of theory. That's just how it is.

    But you're 1300. You don't need to know the theory, your results aren't decided by theory. I think that becomes an issue at something like 2200+ (OTB).

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #10

    wango

    zomgep wrote:

    I often enjoy playing e-pawn games against my opponent as white since I generally know most of the lines and correct moves. Of course, I reach despair as 1. e4, c5 arises. I've tried the morra smith gambit, but it hasn't given me the results I desire. Is there any other solid counter against the Sicilian without enormous chess theory??


    You said solid so I would say as an anti Sicilian choice you could play

    (1) 2. c3 (Alapin)

    (2) 3. Bb5+ vs 2...d6 (Moscow Variation)  & 3.Bb5 vs 2...Nc6 (Rossolimo Variation)

    (3) Or the Closed Sicilian

    Alapin you can play against any type of Sicilian, and is pretty well respected as an Anti-Sicilian line.

    The Rossolimo is probably the best respected "Anti" line out there, but the Moscow is so boring it might make you cry.  At least I did that's why I stopped playing it.  The other problem with adopting this as your main weapon vs. 1...c5 is that you really can't play them against 2...e6 so you either

    1) Play the KIA against this setup

    2) Play 2.c3 and try to transpose into an Alapin

    3) Learn another system vs. 2...e6

    None of these probably appeal to you since you want to save some study time.

    Which brings us to the closed Sicilian, which I also find to be very hard to take. 

    Or you could play Be2 lines against most (Classical, Dragon, Najdorf, and Scheveningen) variations although you'll have to learn something for the other Sicilians.

    Bottom line is if you play 1.e4 then you have to face the Sicilian.  You can take the bull by the horns and learn the open Sicilians, yes you will occasionally be blown out of the water by an opening nerd, but most opponents below 1800 won't know too much theory.

    If you are going for an anti line I'd go with something that you can play against any Sicilian set up so Alapin, Closed, Grand Prix etc...

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #11

    General-Lee

    lol just learn the theory. It's not hard. Just remember 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 (...e6 changes none of the immediate play for white, although I like to play around with 3.d3!?) 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf3 5.Nc3 And play naturally! (just remember to study the dragon [...g6] , which is especially dangerous if you're unprepared. Use the yugoslav attack.)

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #12

    ericmittens

    True, at lower levels the open sicilian can be played very thematically for white. In most of the variations white can simply play in "english attack" style with Be3, f3, Qd2, 0-0-0, and a kingside pawnstorm. Lots of fun and strategically very simple.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #13

    AnthonyCG

    There's also the Kopec 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 (or whatever) 3.Bd3.
  • 5 years ago · Quote · #14

    marvellosity

    Scarblac wrote:

    But you're 1300. You don't need to know the theory, your results aren't decided by theory. I think that becomes an issue at something like 2200+ (OTB).


    No, opening knowledge becomes significant at a lower level than that. My OTB experience indicates that at least 2000 players might get the better of you in the opening if you don't have some decent knowledge.

    Anyhow, if you're 1300, play the Morra and learn how to attack.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #15

    Scarblac

    marvellosity wrote:
    Scarblac wrote:

    But you're 1300. You don't need to know the theory, your results aren't decided by theory. I think that becomes an issue at something like 2200+ (OTB).


    No, opening knowledge becomes significant at a lower level than that. My OTB experience indicates that at least 2000 players might get the better of you in the opening if you don't have some decent knowledge.


    I was thinking of deliberately playing lines that aren't very theoretical. Of course, it can be dangerous to go into sharp theoretical lines without knowing the theory.

    A player at my club has been plateauing around 2250 for years now. Between 2004 and 2008, he rolled dice to decide his first move, both as white and black, with all 20 options possible. His rating stayed around 2250.

    And anyway, even if a 2000 player get the better of you in the opening, there's usually still a middlegame and an endgame to play.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #17

    marvellosity

    Well, I wasn't talking about 1300 players playing 2000s, Reb.

    Scarblac: my point is that if you're 2000, playing a 2000, and they get a nice position out of the opening, the game's going to be a bit of a struggle.

    Like you said I'm 2400 here, but there have been several occasions that I've played some pretty inaccurate moves in the opening vs people rated about 2000, and I've been glad to get out with a draw.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #18

    emoterasu

    try the wing gambit for the sicilian. it goes 1 e4 c5 2 b4 pxb4 3 a3

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