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stonewall


  • 21 months ago · Quote · #22

    chasm1995

    pfren wrote:
    chasm1995 wrote:

    How is it an inferior move, then, and how does it create positional liabilities?

    You will surely understand why it's an inferior move as soon as you learn the game fundamentals. Before doing that there is no point "exploring" openings: If you cannot see the big hole on e4 which was granted to Black for absolutely no positional compensation, then I'm afraid I can't explain anything to you.

    Then why not try explaining the fundementals that would allow me to conclude that?

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #23

    Scottrf

    He did, by committing to f4 early you're creating a square (e4) where no pawns can attack, and potentially your opponent can bring a piece to later in the game, as well as weakening the castled king position.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #24

    TitanCG

    chasm1995 wrote:
    pfren wrote:
    chasm1995 wrote:

    How is it an inferior move, then, and how does it create positional liabilities?

    You will surely understand why it's an inferior move as soon as you learn the game fundamentals. Before doing that there is no point "exploring" openings: If you cannot see the big hole on e4 which was granted to Black for absolutely no positional compensation, then I'm afraid I can't explain anything to you.

    Then why not try explaining the fundementals that would allow me to conclude that?

    Because it would take a book to do that...

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #25

    Fear_ItseIf

    chasm1995 wrote:

    How is it an inferior move, then, and how does it create positional liabilities?

    bf5 is especially strong after 1.d4 d5 2.f4?! bf5.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #26

    InfiniteFlash

    simply put, 2.f4 is just = probably. Black basically is just down one tempo compared to the normal dutch. If i just want to play regular chess without much theory, the stonewall as white would probably pop up right next to the london system...

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #27

    LongIslandMark

    The stonewall attack (as white) had some popularity a few decades ago after an article in one of the chess magazines. I have a book somewhere in the house that recommends it to the casual player as the opening to learn if you just want to have some fun games with your neighbors at the local pub.

    The advantages as white are it sets up some interesting king-side attacks, often involving a queen sacrifice after black castles. If played with minimal attention to your opponents moves, if black allows you to follow book for 6 - 10 moves, also makes it unlikely you will lose quickly.

    The fact that it has been recommended to casual players, and has not been generally adopted by masters (as white) should tell you something.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #28

    C-nack

    It's a very good opening...

     

    at your level.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #29

    Scottrf

    Cnacnel wrote:

    It's a very good opening...

     

    at your level.

    Why do chess players feel the need to say things like this?

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #30

    Noreaster

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 21 months ago · Quote · #31

    C-nack

    Scottrf wrote:
    Cnacnel wrote:

    It's a very good opening...

     

    at your level.

    Why do chess players feel the need to say things like this?

    It's not the need, it's the truth.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #32

    Scottrf

    A little decorum and a little less arrogance wouldn't go amiss.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #33

    moonnie

    With normal play from black (normal development etc) there is very little chance for a kingside attack in the reversed stonewall formation.

    • Ba6 seems to slow for me. It will probably lead to an equal game but why play difficult when easy to good enough
    • g7-g6 is in my opinion a case of the cure being worse than the disease. With your pawn still on g7 black can play f6 kicking the knight from e5. With a pawn on g6, f6 will be too dangerous as will weaken f6 and g6 to much. It also leaves you open to attacks with h4--> h5 and f4 -> f5. By playing g6 you are actually justifying  the move f4.
    • Bf5 seems most sensible to me as you develop and directly hit the weakend white squares. White can hardly trade his white squared bischop as it would weaking the white squares even more. I also like Bg4 after logical white move Nf3 pinning the knight and exchanging it later. With suchs a locked up center white will not have much pleasure of his bischop pair.
  • 21 months ago · Quote · #34

    moonnie

    Ow and how are you going to get a semi open h-file ? There is no way that black is going to open it after he castled short and unless he plays g6 it will be very hard to force him to open it for you.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #35

    mashanator

    Move order is of HUGE importance in the Stonewall. Often you can feint a Colle System by delaying f4. My favourite way of playing it:

    Of course, Black does not have to completely ignore White on the Kingside, but a Bishop sac on h7 followed by a battery mate on the h-file is generally what White is aiming for. Nd2/Bd3 early stops all Ne4 possibilities (Qf3 also helps at times). Commiting yourself so early with 2. f4 seems terrible to me.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #36

    TetsuoShima

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 17 months ago · Quote · #37

    DarthMusashi

    Listed below is a recent game where I played the Stonewall Attack.
    The Stonewall was my main opening against 1...d5. See game below:

    [Event "Blitz 15 min"]
    [Site "?"]
    [Date "2013.03.25"]
    [Round "?"]
    [White "Nakamura, Clyde"]
    [Black "DrunkenMaster 1.2"]
    [Result "1-0"]
    [ECO "D00"]
    [WhiteElo "2100"]
    [BlackElo "2300"]
    [Annotator "Stonewall Attack"]
    [PlyCount "87"]
    [EventDate "2013.??.??"]

    {577MB, ClydeNakamura} 1. d4 d5 2. e3 Nf6 3. Bd3 e6 4. c3 c5 5. f4 {the
    Stonewall Attack} c4 {better was Nc6 developing a piece} 6. Bc2 Bd6 7. Nf3 O-O 8. O-O Nbd7 9. Nbd2 {Diagram #} b5 10. a3 {preventing b4} Bb7 11. Ne5 Qc7 12. Qf3 a5 13. g4 Be7 14. g5 Nxe5 15. fxe5 Nd7 16. Qh5 g6 17. Qh6 Rfc8 {Not sure why Drunken Master played this move which weakened the f7 square} 18. Rxf7 Kxf7 19. Qxh7+ Ke8 20. Bxg6+ Kd8 21. Qf7 Qc6 (21... Nf8 22. Qe8#) (21... Nb6 22. Qe8#) 22. Qe8+ Kc7 23. Qxe7 Rg8 24. Bh5 Raf8 25. Nf3 {providing extra protection to the g pawn} Kb8 26. Bd2 {this B is the bad B and needs to be repositioned to a better and more active square} Bc8 27. Kg2 Bb7 28. Be1 Kc7 29. Bg3 Kb6 30. h4 Kc7 31. Ng1 {this N is headed for the f4 square where it will attack the e6 pawn} Kc8 32. Ne2 Rh8 33. Bf7 Rh7 34. g6 Rhxf7 35. gxf7 Rd8
    36. Nf4 Nf8 37. h5 Qd7 38. Qf6 Kb8 39. Ng6 b4 40. Rf1 {over protecting the f pawn} bxc3 41. bxc3 {humn, Black is giving me an open b file to work with} Qc7 42. Bh4 Rc8 43. Nxf8 Rxf8 44. Qe7 {1:31-2:28  if 44....Qc8 45.Rb1 threatening Rxb2+ and Black cannot defend both the B  at b7 and the R at f8} 1-0

  • 17 months ago · Quote · #38

    DarthMusashi

  • 17 months ago · Quote · #39

    pellik

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 17 months ago · Quote · #40

    warrior689

    just to note the right sequence is d4 e3 Bd3 f4 c3 Nf3


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