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The ideas behind the queens gambit


  • 2 years ago · Quote · #1

    darkpower25

    Hi, I've always had trouble finding this kind of information, so it would be very helpful if someone could give me some information on the queens gambit, it seems like an interesting gambit, and I have had trouble procuring and reading the literature about it.

    Specifically I would like to know the ideas behind the queens gambit, that is to say what are whites objectives, and how are they usually met, pros and cons of the various lines, why they are used.  I would also like to know the ideas for black, as well, the goals of black in the queens gambit, the pros and cons of the various counter-gambits used.

    If someone could help me that would be awesome

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #2

    pellik

    The QG can lead to a number of different openings- QGD, QGA, slav, chigorin, ragozin, etc. But I'll presume you're interested in the QGD. 

    If you're looking for a lot of depth on each move in the QGD I recommend you pick up the book 'Queen's Gambit Declined' by Matthew Sadler. It's written from the black side but it explains quite a bit about the various plans and how they are dealt with.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #3

    Hypocrism

    No offense, but you'll do better ignoring opening theory until you improve your tactics.

     

    For information like this, you really need a book.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #4

    Estragon

    I agree with Hypocrism that openings should not be studied until you master simple tactics at least well enough to get through most of your games without losing material to a tactic you didn't see or walking into a mate.

    But it does no harm to ask about opening ideas, as long as you aren't trying to study variations, which will waste your time at this point.  In fact, it is a good way to start learning the openings, just get the general ideas of each, then apply the basic principles of development with those ideas in mind.  In the long and short runs, it will serve you better.

     

    The basic idea of the Queen's Gambit is simple enough:  White wishes to exchange his c-pawn for Black's d-pawn to unbalance the position and leave himself with a central pawn majority.  It is not a "true" gambit because White doesn't actually risk a pawn - if Black attempts to grab it and hold on he swiftly runs into difficulties. 

    In the majority of cases, either Black will play ...dxc4 at some point or if he delays it, White may play c4xd5.  In either case, White retains a central pawn majority at the cost of giving Black the Queenside majority - often an advantage in the ending since the Kings will normally be castled on the other side and find it a long distance to cover.  White's advantages with the central majority tend to come earlier in the game, though.

    There are two main ways to exploit this central majority.  The first and most obvious is to try to enforce e4, gaining space in the center.  This is not often easily executed, however, as Black has many ways to counter or cover the e4 square.  So the most common method is the Minority Attack on the Queenside.

    It seems counterintuitive to advance the minority on the vulnerable side, and it is not advised to be undertaken in the ending except in extraordinary circumstances.  But it can lead to a strong initiative for White in the middlegame.  White will use the half-open c-file to pressure the Black c-pawn, augmented by the minority advance b2-b4-b5, frequently with the preparatory a2-a3 or a2-a4.  By attacking the c6 pawn, he may force open the file upon which he already has a Rook and/or Queen or the b-file where he may place a Rook.  Black can easily be saddled with an extra pawn which is backward and under attack on a half-open file.

    You will be amazed at the possibilities this opens up for White.  The Minority Attack is a serious weapon.

    Black is not without his own counterplay, though, which generally comes either in the center with his own ...e5 strike, or on the Kingside, taking advantage of the slow-developing Minority Attack to build a surge against White's King.  There are many different plans which can be implemented from the basic QGD formation with ...e6.

    Black may also pre-empt the Minority Attack by playing a Slav formation with an early ...c6, which blunts the MA in a direct way, abandoning for the moment some of the other counterplay ideas to hit back on the Queenside.  It enables Black to consider taking on c4 and trying to hold the pawn, or turn it into a pawn storm against White, as well as to turn back to the countermeasures in the center or Kingside at some point, and has become very popular in the last 15-20 years.

    I hope this helps as a quick discussion of the ideas in QG - notice I spoke mainly of pawns because they are the key in any formation, the pieces play where they can based upon the pawn structure, which governs the range of ideas and plans.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #5

    darkpower25

    yes, this helps a lot, thanks very much

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #6

    benonidoni

    Hypocrism wrote:

    No offense, but you'll do better ignoring opening theory until you improve your tactics.

     

    For information like this, you really need a book.


     Do we have to constantly listen to these guys who want to ignore opening theory and sell tactics books. Go play with your puzzles.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #7

    Phelon

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #8

    Hypocrism

    benonidoni wrote:
    Hypocrism wrote:

    No offense, but you'll do better ignoring opening theory until you improve your tactics.

     

    For information like this, you really need a book.


     Do we have to constantly listen to these guys who want to ignore opening theory and sell tactics books. Go play with your puzzles.


    Did you even look at the games the OP is playing?

    The chance his opponents will follow book moves is SO low at this level that there is no point thinking about openings. Every game will be won on a tactic or oversight. If he doubled his tactical ability, he would probably go up 500 points, if he learned the entire sicilian, 1.e4 and QGD, he might go up 50 points, if he's lucky.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #9

    ChessisGood

    I would suggest the videos b Kasparov. They are quite informative.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #10

    benonidoni

    Hypocrism wrote:
    benonidoni wrote:
    Hypocrism wrote:

    No offense, but you'll do better ignoring opening theory until you improve your tactics.

     

    For information like this, you really need a book.


     Do we have to constantly listen to these guys who want to ignore opening theory and sell tactics books. Go play with your puzzles.


    Did you even look at the games the OP is playing?

    The chance his opponents will follow book moves is SO low at this level that there is no point thinking about openings. Every game will be won on a tactic or oversight. If he doubled his tactical ability, he would probably go up 500 points, if he learned the entire sicilian, 1.e4 and QGD, he might go up 50 points, if he's lucky.


     Bullshit

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #11

    AnthonyCG

    benonidoni wrote:
    Hypocrism wrote:
    benonidoni wrote:
    Hypocrism wrote:

    No offense, but you'll do better ignoring opening theory until you improve your tactics.

     

    For information like this, you really need a book.


     Do we have to constantly listen to these guys who want to ignore opening theory and sell tactics books. Go play with your puzzles.


    Did you even look at the games the OP is playing?

    The chance his opponents will follow book moves is SO low at this level that there is no point thinking about openings. Every game will be won on a tactic or oversight. If he doubled his tactical ability, he would probably go up 500 points, if he learned the entire sicilian, 1.e4 and QGD, he might go up 50 points, if he's lucky.


     Bullshit


    Not really. Why learn theory when I can just pawn storm my opponent? He'll think it's unsound and that some magical move will save him from my horrible play... The 500 point thing is possible as well. I play the Engish opening all the time but tactics always win the day.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #12

    darkpower25

    I'm not trying to learn the lines, so much as understand the ideas behind those lines

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #13

    helltank

    The ideas behind the QG are simple:

    1)Exchange a centre pawn for a non-centre pawn so White can dominate the centre.

    2)Attempt to exploit the opponent's queenside with a minority attack and using his queenside pieces to force backwards or doubled pawns. 

    3)Castle Kingside and try to defend from Black counterplay there.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #14

    Estragon

    benonidoni wrote:
    Hypocrism wrote:
    benonidoni wrote:
    Hypocrism wrote:

    No offense, but you'll do better ignoring opening theory until you improve your tactics.

     

    For information like this, you really need a book.


     Do we have to constantly listen to these guys who want to ignore opening theory and sell tactics books. Go play with your puzzles.


    Did you even look at the games the OP is playing?

    The chance his opponents will follow book moves is SO low at this level that there is no point thinking about openings. Every game will be won on a tactic or oversight. If he doubled his tactical ability, he would probably go up 500 points, if he learned the entire sicilian, 1.e4 and QGD, he might go up 50 points, if he's lucky.


     Bullshit


    Well, yes, we can see that opening study has worked out well for you - even better than school.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #15

    Phelon

    paulgottlieb wrote:

    Darkpower25, the OP is rated around 1150. I think the book you recommended is appropriate for someone rated 2500 or above


    you heard it everyone, my recommendation is good up to GM and over ;)


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