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  • 15 months ago · Quote · #21

    Estragon

    EscherehcsE wrote:
    Indyfilmguy wrote:

    I have a question for the Gremlin:  Can you tell us what the "opening principles" are?

    Who's the Gremlin?

    http://exeterchessclub.org.uk/content/ten-rules-opening

    And it's easy to overlook the link for Purdy's opening guidelines on that same page:

    http://exeterchessclub.org.uk/node/241/8#comment-8

    +1

    There is no need for more precise opening knowledge than this at the OP's level, and many reasons that working on openings at a deeper level could be harmful to chess development.

    Besides, you will win many more games by better endgame knowledge than opening knowledge anyway, and endgame theory only very rarely changes - and then only for very specific situations.

  • 15 months ago · Quote · #22

    Remellion

    @Mogwai (but also all others): Honestly you have no need for opening knowledge to start playing chess. I had rudimentary knowledge (can name the general opening but no clue how to play it) when I started, and revelled in the fact that any game would go out of book by move 4 (if it didn't, I would deviate intentionally, sometimes suicidally too.)

    What is happening is a gross overestimation of the opponent. Usually (even at my current level) people have no clue what they're doing in the opening. And we get by fine, since not playing the "best" move has no meaning even at super GM level. What matters is you're not blundering, which is all you need to survive to a playable middlegame.

    Plus, people usually switch up openings, or play stuff they have no clue about. For instance, I rely on two-three wildly different main defences against e4 (Caro-Kann and Bird's Ruy Lopez, or Italian) and try complete nonsense from time to time (got in early trouble with a 4. f3 Nimzo, or returning to 1. f4, or playing hippos.) There is no guarantee your opponent knows what they're doing.

    Eventually you'll be familiar with most openings on some basic level at least. But for now, don't attach any importance to serious opening study, it won't boost your game at all. (I haven't memorised any lines ever whoo)

  • 15 months ago · Quote · #23

    Disgruntled_Sheep

    3point14times2 wrote:
    AdorableMogwai wrote:

    Yeah following general opening principles is what I did with the Scandinavian.

    "Hey if I take the d5 pawn the queen will come out early and I can win a tempo on the queen with knight to c3"

    Unfortunately by doing this I was walking into a main line I knew absolutely nothing about and my opponent had probably played for years.

    How do Ifit 3000 games in one year, simple, by playing everyday. I just started playing at chess.com a few days ago and I already have like 50 standard length games here.

    Oh. Well, using my calculator I see that 3000/365 = 8.219178... which means that he has to play 8 games per day!

    ...Isn't that a lot? :O

    It sure is... According to his profile, he's complted 54 games in 4 months. Maybe a slight exaggeration... Wink

  • 15 months ago · Quote · #24

    AdorableMogwai

    Disgruntled_Sheep wrote:

    It sure is... According to his profile, he's complted 54 games in 4 months. Maybe a slight exaggeration...

    I've played 550 games in these past 3 months alone when you count the ones I played here and on lichess. Look closer before you imply I'm a liar. 4 months ago I played 1 game on chess.com , and the rest of the 54 games chess.com games I played in the past 3 days because Lichess was having technical issues. Look at my lichess profile

    http://en.lichess.org/@/Kevin5

    Tonight I played a few blitz games which is something I rarely do. 99% of my games are 30 minutes per side. That account I created on July 25th of this year and I have 503 games played 99% of which are 30 minutes per side. Before that account I had another but deleted it.

  • 15 months ago · Quote · #25

    AdorableMogwai

    The rest of you (besides DisgruntledSheep) thanks for your comments. Looks like I'll go back to studying tactics and endgame.

  • 15 months ago · Quote · #26

    Talfan1

    glad if i helped in any way even if it left you rejecting the line i used at least it was looked at by you good luck and good chess 

  • 15 months ago · Quote · #27

    denner90

    Basic development, pawn structure intact, recognizing and using/avoiding pins and forks will get you through to the middle game in most games. Don't burn yourself out trying to be an opening encyclopedia. It's supposed to be fun.

  • 15 months ago · Quote · #28

    returnofxpchesser

    That IM is a stupid idiot the english is a good all around opening and can transpose into alot of variations. Lets say its kinda like the sicilian with black colors.

  • 15 months ago · Quote · #29

    Scottrf

    returnofxpchesser wrote:

    That IM is a stupid idiot the english is a good all around opening and can transpose into alot of variations. Lets say its kinda like the sicilian with black colors.

    He didn't say it was a bad opening, he said bad for beginners.

  • 15 months ago · Quote · #30

    Remellion

    Very bad for beginners. To use it to its fullest, you need good understanding of most QP openings, reversed Sicilian formations, independent English setups, a good sense of positional play, and the ability to handle transpositions and reversed-colour openings well. It's much easier to actively play for a good middlegame with other choices.

  • 15 months ago · Quote · #31

    agileX10

    EscherehcsE wrote:
    Indyfilmguy wrote:

    I have a question for the Gremlin:  Can you tell us what the "opening principles" are?

    Who's the Gremlin?

    http://exeterchessclub.org.uk/content/ten-rules-opening

    And it's easy to overlook the link for Purdy's opening guidelines on that same page:

    http://exeterchessclub.org.uk/node/241/8#comment-8

    Thanks for the link. Can someone please explain this entry from Lasker's rules for opening: "Do not pin the adverse King Knight (ie. by Bg5) before your opponent has castled."

    I do this all the time as black so apparently it's an immediate change I can make to improve my game, but an understanding of why this is poor play would be helpful.

  • 15 months ago · Quote · #32

    AdorableMogwai

    I think there are some tactics if you pin the king's knight too soon, for example I've had this happen twice when I was playing the Budapest Gambit and my opponent declined by pushing the pawn by.


    Also there's something you can do in the Smith-Morra gambit if they try to pin the king's knight too soon with bishop captures f7.

  • 15 months ago · Quote · #33

    hicetnunc

    @agile :

    Because this might just help your opponent attack your own king with a pawn storm, like in this famous game :



  • 15 months ago · Quote · #34

    agileX10

    Thank you both for the interesting examples. I learned something today.


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