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thoughts on the kings gambit?


  • 7 years ago · Quote · #1

    CheckThis1

    I like the kings gambit but I need help on it!

  • 7 years ago · Quote · #2

    Narkon

    What sort of help?

    And on which KG? 


  • 7 years ago · Quote · #3

    CheckThis1

    Narkon wrote:

    What sort of help?

    And on which KG? 


    Just genral info and, do you think it is a good opening? what is your favorete line of it? anithing. all lines. 


  • 7 years ago · Quote · #4

    batgirl

    chessgames.com is a database of master and/or historical games

    it has 7340 King Gambits

    3342 of which white wins

    2767 of which black wins

    1231 of which are draws

    4908 are KGA of which white wins 2194 and black wins 1912

    2432 are KGD of which white wins 1148 and black wins 885.

    (the numbers above only represent the database and shouldn't be used to make any blanket conclusions about the opening itself.) 

    All the above links lead to a sub-list of those games from oldest to latest, each of which can be clicked on and played through. One good way to learn an opening is to see how the masters play them. That way you not only see book moves, but you also learn why some moves aren't very good.


  • 7 years ago · Quote · #5

    Singa

    There's somebody here who have writtten a lot "about chess"  in chess.com. and people are impressed.  But the 'litmus test" (sorry, a chemistry term, I am using)  of our chess prowess and knowledge is how good we are at the chessboard. We can pretend to know a lot, but we have to  prove it in actual play! It is here that all our knowledge and expertise is revealed for all to see! Dr. Siebert Tarrasch, a great chess-master, of the 19th century once said in exasperation, I quote, "Those who CAN play chess!  Those who CAN'T write about it!"  unquote.   I repeat,  my request to play a game with this person just to test her.  It  really doesn't  matter whether I win or lose, because I am not a chess-master  neither am I a chess professional!  Let's just play for the fun of it!
  • 7 years ago · Quote · #6

    jkor

    What the KGA and KGD acronyms are for ?


  • 7 years ago · Quote · #7

    jkor

    Singa wrote: There's somebody here who have writtten a lot "about chess"  in chess.com. and people are impressed.  But the 'litmus test" (sorry, a chemistry term, I am using)  of our chess prowess and knowledge is how good we are at the chessboard. We can pretend to know a lot, but we have to  prove it in actual play! It is here that all our knowledge and expertise is revealed for all to see! Dr. Siebert Tarrasch, a great chess-master, of the 19th century once said in exasperation, I quote, "Those who CAN play chess!  Those who CAN'T write about it!"  unquote.   I repeat,  my request to play a game with this person just to test her.  It  really doesn't  matter whether I win or lose, because I am not a chess-master  neither am I a chess professional!  Let's just play for the fun of it!

    This is really childish.


  • 7 years ago · Quote · #8

    likesforests

    jkor, the King's Gambit is 1.e4 e5 2.f4

     

    If Black accepts the pawn (2...exf4) we enter the King's Gambit Accepted (KGA). If Black declines the pawn (anything else) we enter the King's Gambit Declined (KGD). 


  • 7 years ago · Quote · #9

    likesforests

    Here's an illustrative game that shows how tactical and interesting playing the King's Gambit can be! (Bonus points if anyone recognizes it) Smile

     


  • 7 years ago · Quote · #10

    jkor

    Off course. I'm sorry, probably it was a very inconsequential question, but english acronyms really drive me crazy.

    Thank you very much, anyway.


  • 7 years ago · Quote · #11

    jkor

    What about the Falkbeer countergambit?
    According to chessgames.com it has the following record:

    white wins: 39.2%

    black wins: 43.5%

    draws: 17.3%


  • 7 years ago · Quote · #12

    Singa

    Dear jkor,   You wouldn't say it's childish if you had been attacked so vehemently for something  you had written with "tongue in cheek"!  I indicated this in my post by ,including the exclamation "Heh!" Heh!", when I narrated the scene at the opera house where Morphy played his famous game against the two noblemen. Actually nobody can really know what transpired there at that time! It was more than 150 years ago! The score of the game may have been recorded and kept. But can anyone to-day, really claim to  know what happened there? Whatever record we have of the incident,   whether from the internet or from of our library and database  here at chess.com,  must necessarily come from "hearsay", and "stories" being  told and written down from one generation to the next!  For instance how do we know that Morphy was a close friend of the Duke and Count. The aristocracy in Europe at that time was very snobbish and pompous!
  • 7 years ago · Quote · #13

    likesforests

    Singa, you are a chess coach with years of experience teaching and playing. And batgirl is an experienced chess historian. You both have interesting viewpoints and info that everyone could benefit from. I wish the personal conflict could be settled somehow. Hmm... maybe a batgirl-Singa match is not such a bad idea. Wink


    I actually think it's great you ask your students to study Morphy. Long ago I played quickly through many of his games for ideas, but now I'm studying them more slowly to improve my calculcation skills. They're a veritable goldmine. And yes, a similar effort would also help chesscrazy learn about the King's Gambit!


  • 7 years ago · Quote · #14

    miyagi

    I like to play KG a lot as it usually is an interesting game each time and is full of traps and tricks
  • 7 years ago · Quote · #15

    greyfox

    likesforests wrote:

    Here's an illustrative game that shows how tactical and interesting playing the King's Gambit can be! (Bonus points if anyone recognizes it)

     

     


     spassky-fischer??


  • 7 years ago · Quote · #16

    batgirl

    Paul Morphy vs Amateur
  • 7 years ago · Quote · #17

    Singa

    likesforests,   thank you for your comment.  I feel a little better now!  Its  just that  I  do not like to be insulted by  a  young  person  who showed no respect for the  other guy's  feelings! 
  • 7 years ago · Quote · #18

    KingLeopold

    I teach the KGA to my students. I don't stress lines of play, but instead I try and teach what idea you are trying to achieve when play a particular opening. With that in mind, I tell my students the King's Gambit has 2 goals:

    1.Domination of the centre.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    2.Focus all your pieces on the square f7!


  • 7 years ago · Quote · #19

    Etienne

    Singa I would stop that right now as it's not in your favor. First, it had nothing to do with the topic, and second playing abilities have nothing to do with historical knowledge. As it is, you only sound like a grumpy old man who takes offense because he's been refuted.
  • 7 years ago · Quote · #20

    batgirl

    "What about the Falkbeer countergambit?
    According to chessgames.com it has the following record:"

     

    jkor, It would seem on the surface that the Falkbeer has a good record against the KG. I think one has to be careful about winning %'s from a database, particulary one like chessgames.com's where the games are hand-picked. The percentages are precise for the games in the database, but may not reflect games in toto. Many games, such as Morphy's for example, might be instructive, but one-sided. Also, I think at different skill levels certain openings and defenses may have different results. The Muzio (or even the KG in general) might be very effective at mid-level, but less so at higher levels. I, personally, find it harder to play against the Cunningham defense more so than the Falkbeer, so there could be individual differences whereas certain opening variations are more effective against one person, but less so against another person of similar skill.  Mostly, the KG is a fun opening, especially for white. Even without considering all the beautiful tactics, white asserts immediate pressure on the center with it's wing pawn and poses problems for black to solve. White, on the other hand is forced to play sharply, on the edge.



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