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TO FIANCHETTO or Not FIANCHETTO THAT IS THE QUESTION


  • 3 years ago · Quote · #1

    MsJean

    I was playing chess when my opponent did this bishop move...He said it was called Fianchetto ....Yell What ?  Sealed He promptly gave me the URL.Cool WOW!  Homework in the middle of the chess game!    Laughing Very funny! !

                   So is this an opening worth learning?                                                      What do all of you "smarter" than I am chess players think ?

    .              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fianchetto                 

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #2

    Mezmer

    It has it's strengths and weaknesses. It controls the longest diagonal through the center, but creates a pawn weakness that your opponent might be able to take advantage of if you castle behind it.

    Feel free to send me an unrated online challenge if you want to try it out and discussSmile

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #3

    zudwang

    It's a basic move in the Sicilian defence.  I like it when playing black against PK4.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #4

    UVF02368

    Years ago, playing casually, I do recall a friend of mine doing this move against me, being very inexperienced, I was completely unfamiliar with it.  I laughed at him, saying something along the lines of, "What the hell is that, it goes against opening principles, I will crush you!" That was over a decade ago, but I still remember, I lost that game.

    Yes, it's worth learning, even if you decide to never/rarely play it, other people with definitely play it against you, so you will be learning about it whether you like it or not.

    The idea behind it is to constant pressure on those all important center squares controlling them from afar.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #5

    TheKidProdigy

    Well it's common it could be parts of openings like that ^
    This is called: 
    King's Indian Defense: Normal Variation, Rare Defenses
  • 3 years ago · Quote · #6

    KeViN246

    try it see how it goes. just focus :)

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #7

    MsJean

    UVF02368 wrote:

    Years ago, playing casually, I do recall a friend of mine doing this move against me, being very inexperienced, I was completely unfamiliar with it.  I laughed at him, saying something along the lines of, "What the hell is that, it goes against opening principles, I will crush you!" That was over a decade ago, but I still remember, I lost that game.

    Yes, it's worth learning, even if you decide to never/rarely play it, other people with definitely play it against you, so you will be learning about it whether you like it or not.

    The idea behind it is to constant pressure on those all important center squares controlling them from afar.


    so what is the defense for it ?

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #8

    MsJean

    Cogwheel wrote:

    For those of you who got stuck, this is the correct link to the wiki page ;)

     

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fianchetto


    Thanks so much for the correction :)

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #9

    MsJean

    TheKidProdigy wrote:
    Well it's common it could be parts of openings like that ^
    This is called: 
    King's Indian Defense: Normal Variation, Rare Defenses

    are you saying this is a great defense for it?

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #10

    Mezmer

    There are a number of ways to counter the fianchetto...

    You can beat him to it, or fianchetto after if his knight is blocking his bishop...

    You can be annoying with your pawns...
    You can take advantage of the pawn hole...
  • 3 years ago · Quote · #11

    MsJean

    Oh I see. In reality I have great admiration for my opponent with such knowledge to use fianchetto in this opening. Some people are just to smart ! LOL

    If I castle then I am in lots of trouble?

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #12

    Maxx_Dragon

    The Dragon always fianchettos his King's Bishop whether playing white or black. The moves Nf3, g3, Bg2, 0-0, (for black, Nf6, g6, Bg7, 0-0) surrounds the King with 3 pieces to defend it while controlling one of the two long center diagonals with the KB. Plus, for some reason it frustrates the hell out of some opponents who absolutely hate to play against the opening moves Nf3 or Nf6. Try it MsJean, you might like it!

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #13

    Mezmer

    If you castle behind a fianchetto? No - it is quite safe. It's just a balance of different strengths/advantages vs. weaknesses/disadvantages. Playing chess requires you to create those imbalances - it's a matter of finding opportunities to use your strengths to threaten your opponent's weaknesses.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #14

    MsJean

    lol I have no problem creating weakness ....all mine ....I will give it a try...Wink

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #15

    KeViN246

    plus your opponent thinks you know what youre doing. keeps em confused i always say :D

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #16

    wishiwonthatone

    MsJean wrote:

    so what is the defense for it ?


    I'm not a great player so take my comments with a grain of salt.

    This opening gives me no unusual worry. It looks forboading but I consider it very passive and it's easy to rob that bishop of it's power, at least until late in the game. Either put a pawn line on that diagonal, or better yet block one of the opponents pawns on that diagonal. It renders the bishop almost worthless and is almost like capturing the bishop, because it is blocked.

    You do need to be careful once you enter the end game if somehow it hasn't been removed, and so for that reason I don't recommend castling on the other end of that diagonal.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #17

    MsJean

    Well he has taught me a good lesson with all of your helps :)

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #18

    SirVicious

    If my opponent opens with a fianchetto. I either,feel insulted;or laugh. To open with a fianchetto robs you of the ability to develop properly. It is a very big mistake. If my opponent plays a double fianchetto i offer him a draw.  It should be played only as part of the lines to which it belongs. Oh, defend against it by playing the queens pawn to the fourth square.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #19

    MsJean

    @ Sir Vicious which is where?

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #20

    trysts

    Sometimes, I fianchetto just because "fianchetto" sounds cool!Laughing


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