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What are the best openings?


  • 19 months ago · Quote · #41

    Arcieus

    ok seems that you dont like QGsLaughing

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #42

    royalbishop

    Arcieus wrote:

    help me rate(1-10). ruy lopez,sicillian, queens gambit declined, slav defence, kings indian defence, nimzo-indian defence, queens indian defence, kings indian attack, grunfeld.


    Are you joking?

    When playing first you need to know the main line of these openings. How to evaluate the situation and all of this is useless unless you know how to coordinate your forces for your objective.

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #43

    royalbishop

    Arcieus wrote:

    ok seems that you dont like QGs

    A player here took the Cabbage opening and won with it. It took a little work but he did it. Which in case by theory it would get -50 as violates every opening fundamental to the point a newbie could win against it.

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #44

    xxvalakixx

    Against e4 the best openings are the 1..e5 if you like open positions, and the french defence, if you rather like closed positions. The sicilian defence is for stronger players, I do not really recommend it for intermediate or beginner players, since you will get crushed in the middlegame if white knows how to play. But if you like it, play 1. c5 against e4, but you give the initiative for white, and you give huge activity. For the advantage of center pawn majority, abd such things, but those are good for strong players, who know what to do with them.

    There are several good openings against d4. The simplest, but a bit passive, is the QGD, 1.d4-d5 2.c4-e6, with simple development and possiblity for a later c5 push. I prefer the slav defence. You might try the Indian defences, but first it is recommended to play the classical openings. (d4-d5)

    By the way, you wrote that you know the opening principles. If it is true, you should pass the opening stage easily. You can try it out, read the opening principles, and at the same time analyze an opening, analyze the main lines. You will see that all the moves are based on the opening principles, (develops a piece, controls, the center, etc.) and if you see that the opening does not follow those rules, you can drop it.

    It is that easy.

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #45

    royalbishop

    xxvalakixx wrote:

       You will see that all the moves are based on the opening principles, (develops a piece, controls, the center, etc.) and if you see that the opening does not follow those rules, you can drop it.

    It is that easy.

    Well he figured it all out!

    Can you clear aside tomorrow till next week as i have a couple of Vote Chess teams here at chess.com wwith several players (some 2200+) that will refute it and take you apart slowly for enjoyment as they prove their point. 

    It is clear your going to be back hear one day wondering why you are struggling and willing take a trip to Azetetictuma to find a solution to your chess problems if it would help your game. I think i will introduce you to the little old lady that used to play Bingo every Sun until 6 months ago started playing chess. When she start whuppin you like you took her social security check and count your and then give you a dollar back to get a soda i think you will have a change of heart.

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #46

    royalbishop

    For your sake do not commit no crimes. If you ever end up in prison tell the chess players their you know how to play checkers and nothing about chess. Let them clealy know that the game is to tough for you. As you will be losing half your meals, cigarettes and any other things laying around your cell block.

    And if you can not pay well your taking over their daily responsibilities. Splish-splash with the Tide or some other cheesy brand.

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #47

    kali_ma

    if you're just starting to learn opening theory, stick with straightforward and classical lines.  with the ruy lopez, italian game, sicilian defense, or queen's gambit you aren't likely to get into too much difficulty due to your choice of opening and then you can learn the ideas behind each one.  stay away from the more closed or hypermodern openings for now because you need to develop a sense of timing to play these well.  do not think that because fischer and kasparov played the king's indian that this is the best opening for you - you will probably get crushed if you don't understand its nuances.

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #48

    kali_ma

    and by all means get yourself a copy of "my system" and study opening principles from this.

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #49

    royalbishop

    #1 Best Seller.

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #50

    Arcieus

    ok

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #51

    ViktorHNielsen

    If you play openings such as the Najdorf Sicilian or Kings Indian Defence, almost 5% of your opponents will play what you want! You will study alot of variations, but you will never reach them. You will find yourself in strange openings (e4 c5 2. d3!?) or (1. d4 Nf6 2. Bg5!?)

    If you play the open games and Queens Gambit Declined (QGD), you will find that almost no matter what white plays, you will get positions which looks like the positions you have analysed. You would rarely get the exact position in move 10, but it will look like. Since you will then know typical tactics and plans (from looking at stronger players games), you will increase your playing strength.

    And as a bonus, you will find that chess becomes logical.

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #52

    Arcieus

    thanks

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #53

    royalbishop

    ViktorHNielsen wrote:

    If you play openings such as the Najdorf Sicilian or Kings Indian Defence, almost 5% of your opponents will play what you want! You will study alot of variations, but you will never reach them. You will find yourself in strange openings (e4 c5 2. d3!?) or (1. d4 Nf6 2. Bg5!?)

    If you play the open games and Queens Gambit Declined (QGD), you will find that almost no matter what white plays, you will get positions which looks like the positions you have analysed. You would rarely get the exact position in move 10, but it will look like. Since you will then know typical tactics and plans (from looking at stronger players games), you will increase your playing strength.

    And as a bonus, you will find that chess becomes logical.

    On the Najdorf you could not be more about not needing them. Had a couple times here where i had to crack my book open. It is worse if used in Vote Chess at Chess.com. Thinking about getting a book on but not sure who has a book to make me stronger at it. I realized this when i started looking at the games with the top GM's as they made better moves in the same situation with  quicker results.

    As with the KID you can improvise. A good d4 player will test your knowledge of the KID sooner or later.

    On the QGD ...... your playing at site with a majority of e4 players what do you expect. Try that another site and will retire and looking to play BINGO in the old folks home. Way too many options for QG player. Say you whup that player last summer now try him next summer if he/she has been studing and using same approach. Not much fun. And if you use the same approach 2 years later they will own you on the chess board.

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #54

    varelse1

    French

    Russian

    Italian

    Generally speaking, any opening named after a salad dressing, is good.

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #55

    Fear_ItseIf

    TomHaegin wrote:

    The best opening is the one that you know best.

    i dont care how well someone knows 1.f4 2.g4, they will still get better results with any other opening.


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