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What are the famous open games for Black ?


  • 20 months ago · Quote · #1

    egycottonbrocker

    What are the famous open games for Black ?

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #2

    Irontiger

    Huh ?

    The same as for White, maybe ? Undecided

    Would you mind being more specific ? Did you mean "famous historical games won by Black", "openings that give Black tactical opportunities"...?

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #3

    egycottonbrocker

    thanks , 

    Thanks , Actually I mean what are the openings that give Black tactical opportunities ?

     

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #4

    egycottonbrocker

    Irontiger wrote:

    Huh ?

    The same as for White, maybe ? 

    Would you mind being more specific ? Did you mean "famous historical games won by Black", "openings that give Black tactical opportunities"...?


    Thanks, Actually I mean what are the openings that give Black tactical opportunities ?

     

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #6

    SgtDoodles

    Latvian Gambit is interesting as black (1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 f5!?) if you want to avoid the bookish Spanish/Italian/Scotch openings. Could be a good weapon if you know a lot of the lines.

    There is, of course, the well-known Sicilian defence and Indian defences.

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #7

    Irontiger

    The Latvian is... interesting, that's the word. I would say it's crappy, but of course that's only my opinion.

    Well, basically you can't have it all : a sound opening, that offers sharp positions, and that doesn't require any book knowledge. Sicilian (1.e4 c5) needs book knowledge in most of the lines, but it is sound (well, I think so...) and means sharp play ; whereas the Latvian is just a cheap trick for unprepared opponents.

    Against 1.e4, I occasionally use the French (1...e6 with the idea 2.d4 d5) but you need to justify that you trapped your c8 bishop, and if you have no idea of where you are going you will be slowly positionnaly crushed. The Sicilian Najdorf or Dragon do require tons of theory to be played correctly, but to be played approximatively does not require much planning : push the pawns against the king, sacrifice if needed, and mate, before the other does so.

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #8

    egycottonbrocker

    zkman wrote:

    I would recommend the sicilian against 1. e4 and the King's Indian against 1. d4 if you want some unbalanced positions.

    Thanks, you are right i also recommend the Sicilian against 1. e4 and the King's Indian against 1. d4 as i do not like to know many openings but i prefer to concentrate in 2 openings for white and another 2 openings for black .

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #9

    egycottonbrocker

    Irontiger wrote:

    The Latvian is... interesting, that's the word. I would say it's crappy, but of course that's only my opinion.

    Well, basically you can't have it all : a sound opening, that offers sharp positions, and that doesn't require any book knowledge. Sicilian (1.e4 c5) needs book knowledge in most of the lines, but it is sound (well, I think so...) and means sharp play ; whereas the Latvian is just a cheap trick for unprepared opponents.

    Against 1.e4, I occasionally use the French (1...e6 with the idea 2.d4 d5) but you need to justify that you trapped your c8 bishop, and if you have no idea of where you are going you will be slowly positionnaly crushed. The Sicilian Najdorf or Dragon do require tons of theory to be played correctly, but to be played approximatively does not require much planning : push the pawns against the king, sacrifice if needed, and mate, before the other does

     

    Thanks, i recommend the Sicilian against 1. e4 and the King's Indian against 1. d4 as i do not like to know many openings but i prefer to concentrate in 2 openings for white and another 2 openings for black , the thing i do not practice the French against (1.e4 ) instead i use the Sicilian , what about the King's Indian against 1. d4 .

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #10

    Irontiger

    The KID has the advantage , as the sicilian, not to require much versality. Yes, you have to adapt to the opponent's moves, but much less than in other openings. The basic plan is the same for the whole middlegame (attack on such side without getting crushed on the other).

     

    Against 1.d4 my competition weapon is the Nimzo-Indian, with transposition to Benoni in the 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 lines (sometimes, I use KID and Dutch in unserious games). But these require maybe more versatility than much others ; I use it hoping to lose my opponent in the maze of positional minefield (which happens often !). You must know whether doubled c3-c4 pawns are ok or not, whether you should open the position (multiple factors battle : development, pair of bishops, castling choices...), where to place every piece (there are many choices, but associated with different plans), when and where push pawns, etc.

  • 16 months ago · Quote · #11

    egycottonbrocker

    whaabout Dutch Defense? 


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