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What does a Class E/D player need to know to play the Queen's Gambit?


  • 12 months ago · Quote · #21

    royalbishop

    Your playing at Chess.com!

    They do not just let you set up your opening patterns. I still see something new that i never saw before using it. We could be here all weekend and i still could not bring you up to speed.

    My suggestion play your friends using it first. Study games of GrandMasters that use it. Find Vote Chess games where they are played here. Everything else is just luck.

  • 12 months ago · Quote · #22

    royalbishop

    No problem with 4 Nf3 if you can reach it withot being attacked in a game at chess.com. And when you do you better have a plan in mind and just no aimlessly moving your pieces as your opponent is building up an attack that they are famaliar with against the QGD.

    Even in some master games Black attack early long before either should castle. If not careful the game can end in the early 20's. I think the Queen's Gambit has the most defenses that can be used against it added the variations of each.

  • 12 months ago · Quote · #23

    DrSpudnik

    Would it be wrong to mention the Dutch here?

  • 12 months ago · Quote · #24

    royalbishop

    And the Duthch is only good for black as a surprise.

    And if you do not know now to beat with the Queens Gambit you will find the next playery and the player after that and etc will use it till you find a way to beat it (At chess.com). 

    It is a good as surprise but if that does not work i say black is in trouble. When i first encountered it i could not find it any QG reference. I found a way to beat it buying a general chess book. Then i was able to get creative with ways to beat it.

  • 12 months ago · Quote · #25

    dpnorman

    Absolutely not! Is there any Dutch theory I need? I have heard that against the Dutch, most d4 players just play a Catalan-like setup with g3 and Bg2. Is this true?

  • 12 months ago · Quote · #26

    DrSpudnik

    That's the Usual GM treatment of the Dutch, but there are some whacko opening gambits that are irritating.

  • 12 months ago · Quote · #27

    royalbishop

    I have 3 notebooks by hand on references on the Queen's Gambit alone. I have more single papers here and their on variations of it that is rarely seen online and i mean rarely seen. I pull them out once in a blue moon against a player that wants to play in the book the whole game or just because i can. Have to save some when i go to tournament.

  • 12 months ago · Quote · #28

    royalbishop

    dpnorman wrote:

    Absolutely not! Is there any Dutch theory I need? I have heard that against the Dutch, most d4 players just play a Catalan-like setup with g3 and Bg2. Is this true?

    That is the long way and gives black time to set up the middle game and or End Game.

    The bottom line you need to attack black's castled position. This has to be down with practice at your level. Not being funny as if you do not have the experience your in for a world of hurt.

    Since you used to play e4....   I am sure you are famaliar with Bobby Fischer. Study his games how he attacked the black castled position. The best on one "Sac Sac and Mate" Once you understand that game the Dutch will never be a problem.

  • 12 months ago · Quote · #29

    royalbishop

    The only thing that works on all levels against the Queen's Gambit is when they do not play d5 at all or real late in the game where the pawn structures are mobile.

  • 12 months ago · Quote · #30

    dpnorman

    I was just looking at some Dutch stuff, and something I saw was that white can, if he wants, play an early Bg5 and Bxf6 and double black's pawns, trading off a bishop that wouldn't be doing much anyway. Just to have something if I go against the Dutch, is this a decent idea?

  • 12 months ago · Quote · #31

    royalbishop

    dpnorman wrote:

    I was just looking at some Dutch stuff, and something I saw was that white can, if he wants, play an early Bg5 and Bxf6 and double black's pawns, trading off a bishop that wouldn't be doing much anyway. Just to have something if I go against the Dutch, is this a decent idea?

    That is it!

    You just did not not follow up. It then goes into attacking the castled king with all avaible forces which makes the Dutch worthless. But the attack can not really begin to start unless black o-o or your sure black will o-o and not o-o-o.  This can be done with a frontal attack or use or a combo of frontal and diagonal attacks.

    For that reason if you studied Bobby Fischer King side attacks this is not that hard to achieve in a game. The list of ways to attack the Dutch vary due to black's pawn formation but the one you listed works for all of them.

  • 12 months ago · Quote · #32

    royalbishop

    Almost forgot have to watch out for openings that transpose into the Dutch which why the Queen's Gambit is so slow in development and when to castle. Reason why it takes so much time to get famaliar with it. The general idea of the Queen's Gambit is easy to learn but to apply it is another story.

  • 12 months ago · Quote · #33

    blumzovich

    dpnorman wrote:

    Is there any simple set of moves I can play against most of these without that much difficulty? Is there anything stopping me from just sort of setting up d4 c4 Nc3 Nf3 e3 Qc2 Bd3 0-0 Re1 etc?

    Yes there is, but you have to forego the early c4.  Instead 1. d4, 2. Nf3 and 3. e3 are almost unstoppable by Black.  Now you can play c4, before or after Bd3 or Be2, and 0-0, but instead you might want to play c3.

  • 12 months ago · Quote · #34

    springerarchie

    Assuming your question is a serious one, "and that's a stretch" you seem to be searching for and opening that there will be no interaction by the black pieces to interfere with what you want to set up. That doesn't exist! The closest opening I could suggest you STUDY, is the Colle System. You'll get some of what you're looking for looking for in  your "dream setup" except you do appear to be ready to exploit your "dream setup".

  • 12 months ago · Quote · #35

    vinsvis

    dpnorman wrote:

    Is there any simple set of moves I can play against most of these without that much difficulty? Is there anything stopping me from just sort of setting up d4 c4 Nc3 Nf3 e3 Qc2 Bd3 0-0 Re1 etc?

    Another idea to avoid studying a lot variations (although there will always be some), is using the repertoire suggested by GM Summerscale in his book A killer chess opening repertoire.  His idea is to play always 1.d4 and 2.Nf3, and the choose 3 different set-ups depending on what black answers. Options are the Colle-Zukertort if black plays d5 and e6, the Barry Attack if black plays the Grunfeld set-up with d5 and g6, and the 150-attack if black plays the Pirc set-up with d6 and g6. I recently started a group for players with this or comparable repertoires, so if you're interested you are most welcome:

    http://www.chess.com/groups/home/summerscales-killer-opening-repertoire-group

    But, mainly I agree with most posters here, if your rating is what it is, then you will get a lot more improvement by studying tactics and calculation - just play the opening with sensible moves. 

  • 12 months ago · Quote · #36

    royalbishop

    springerarchie wrote:

    Assuming your question is a serious one, "and that's a stretch" you seem to be searching for and opening that there will be no interaction by the black pieces to interfere with what you want to set up. That doesn't exist! The closest opening I could suggest you STUDY, is the Colle System. You'll get some of what you're looking for looking for in  your "dream setup" except you do appear to be ready to exploit your "dream setup".

     dream setup -  you can get your dream setup it is called practice and experience. This exist in End Games/Mating Patterns. It also can be found sometimes in openings but without the above it is a blown opportunity to win.

    If your always looking for a  dream setup  forget it. If your opponent has any kind of common sense they will evaluate the situation on the board and find a good response.

    The opening is about developing and finding a weakness in your opponents camp you can take advantage of in a game. At the same time you not creating a weakness in your army they can exploit. If your not patient then the Queen's Gambit is not for you at all. Your coming from e4 to d4 where little things early will later give you good advantages later if you can hold on to it. Where e4 is attack, attack and attack with it coming from all different directions on the board.

  • 12 months ago · Quote · #37

    ilgambittoo

    Mere queen's gambit can not win a game for you

    But it surely gains rooms for you and more tactical opportunities. Place rook on opened c file.Place knight on e5. Bishop d3 and dark square bishop on f4 and mate would follow.

  • 12 months ago · Quote · #38

    royalbishop

    ilgambittoo wrote:

    Mere queen's gambit can not win a game for you

    But it surely gains rooms for you and more tactical opportunities. Place rook on opened c file.Place knight on e5. Bishop d3 and dark square bishop on f4 and mate would follow.

    lol

    I wish it was as simple as a Rook on C-file if it was openened all the time. Same for Knight on e5 by means of Ne5. Many players on this site try to pin the King Knight even thought they know it is bad i idea they do it anyway.

    If what you say is true then White wins all the time. GM's would resign when you play 1 d4 and 2 c4 as there would be no reason to continue following your logic.

  • 12 months ago · Quote · #39

    dpnorman

    I played a 30 minute game against a person using the Old Benoni last week and I won because I opponent made a lot of errors. But today I played my first 30 minute game with the actual Queen's Gambit.

    1. d4 d5 2. c4 Bf5 3. Qb3 b6 4. cxd5 Be4 5. Nc3 Nf6 6. Nxe4 Nxe4 7. f3 Nf6 8. e4 a5 9. Bb5+ Nbd7 10. e5 Ng8 11. e6 fxe6 12. dxe6 Nf6 13. Bg5 c6 14. Bxc6 Rc8 15. Bxd7 Nxd7 16. exd7 Qxd7 17. Qxb6 e6 18. a3 Rc6 19. Qxa5 Qxd4 20. Qa8+ Kd7 21. Qd8#

    My opponent made a ton of mistakes. I probably shouldn't have played 15. Bxd7; I think both 15. Qb5 and 15. exd7 are better because they keep the pressure. Otherwise I think I did quite well although I know the Baltic is definitely not main-line :)

  • 12 months ago · Quote · #40

    BettorOffSingle

    It seems the QGD and QGA are dominant at the high levels.  Just about any opening will serve a strong opening student well.  The real key is to aim towards fvaorable formagtions.  A good way to cut study time is to have your entire repertoire aiming at your favorable formations.  If you play the QGD, for example, combining it with the French is a good idea since you can transpose a lot, thus maximizing your study time.

    If you study the Benoni, a good opening to pair this with is the 3...cxd5 line of the Symmetrical English, which can even be reached out of the Reti via 1. Nf3, so you get three lines converging into one formation that you will have studied and played a great deal more.

    As a general rule, any 1400 player would do well to just copy the entire repertoire of their idol, preferably one known for his opening prowess, and begin frmo there.  When I began playing seriously at age twenty, I figured the fastest way to gain respect was to play like a GM in the opening, even if I didn't understand the moves, so I copied Fischer.  Within two years, I was picking most of his lines apart.  Interestingly, Fischer's loegendary Poisoned Pawn seems to have been played not because he liked it, but because the public played 10. e5?! instead of Geller's correct (and now main line) 10. f5!

    The beauty of booking up is that it will get you better games to practice, longer into the game.  Once you hvae that, you're set for middlegame study, though it will take about five or six years to integrate the two, even with fulltime study.

    My peak USCF rating was 2000, btw.


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