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what is the best opening for black?


  • 12 months ago · Quote · #1

    marshaltc

    I have serious problem with black,please help me if you are powerful with black...

    in your mind,what is the best opening for black?

  • 12 months ago · Quote · #2

    granitoman

    I'm not poweful, but black has many options, French Defense among many others.

  • 12 months ago · Quote · #3

    Zigwurst

    Let me solve chess first and I can answer.

  • 12 months ago · Quote · #4

    samir_naganaworkhere

    Like Zigwurst was implying, there is no objective "best" opening, otherwise the game would be solved, and no one would entertain other openings because the "best" is all that would be necessary to play.  

    Tic Tac Toe's "best" opening is any corner square, which leads to a forced draw if player two responds with the center square.  There is no such thing in chess.  

  • 12 months ago · Quote · #5

    ThrillerFan

    Actually, some will argue that the best move for X is the center square, but that's neither here nor there.

    Like the others are saying, there is no "best" opening.  They all have their pros and cons.  Just to name a few examples and the major differences between them:

    Sicilian Najdorf - Black takes extra risks in the form of allowing weaknesses in his position, typically the d5 square, doubled f-pawns, and an open g-file that White usually gets to first, being amongst the most common problems.  In return, Black's going all out for a win.

    King's Indian Defense - Black goes all out on the Kingside to try to mate the White King, and allows his Queenside to be annihilated and ends up in shambles.  In many cases, Black will even allow White to grab the Rook on a8, given the time it takes to do it and get the Knight back into play.  Typically, this defense is kill or be killed.  If White survives the attack, he will usually win all endgames.  Short games typically favor Black, Long games White.

    Caro-Kann Defense - Black keeps weaknesses to a minimum, and in return allows White more space.  However, in many lines, like say, the Classical Variation, White ends up overextending.  In the opening, that 8.h5 push gives White extra space on the Kingside.  However, if it gets down to a single piece and pawns ending, h5 often changes from being a strength to being a liability and is often a glaring weakness.  Unlike the King's Indian, Quick attacks favor White in most cases whereas Black will usually win the long ones.

    Queen's Gambit Declined - Considered Black's most rock-solid response to 1.d4, but also has little winning chances.  In GM Play, this tends to have at least a 70% draw ratio, with roughly 20% of games favoring White and 10% favoring Black, leading to the "typical" 55% score that most mainstream openings tend to score for White.

     

    So it all depends - Are you in a do-or-die situation, where a draw is as good as a loss, like in the final round of a tournament?  Or is a draw acceptable as Black?  Do you want safety and long-term trumps?  Or do you want to burn bridges going all out for a win early on and realizing that you'll probably lose more games this week, but you'll also win more?

     

    Me personally?  I play the Caro-Kann and various forms of the Queen's Gambit Declined - Not so much the Orthodox, but the Slav, Tartakower, and Tarrasch.

  • 12 months ago · Quote · #6

    samir_naganaworkhere

    @Thrillerfan

    It's actually well known that X's best is a corner square, because if O responds anything other than center, X has a forced win in every variation, and so O is forced to play center square in his first move.  Tic tac toe is a forced draw.  Some might argue for x to play center square on first move, but that just shows they don't know that the game is solved.  

  • 12 months ago · Quote · #7

    ThrillerFan

    samir_naganaworkhere wrote:

    @Thrillerfan

    It's actually well known that X's best is a corner square, because if O responds anything other than center, X has a forced win in every variation, and so O is forced to play center square in his first move.  Tic tac toe is a forced draw.  Some might argue for x to play center square on first move, but that just shows they don't know that the game is solved.  

    I'm well aware that the game is solved.  Actually, if I were to play a kid and try to trick him, I'd start in the top center square, where O actually isn't forced to play in the center box.  He can also go for an adjacent corner, but NOT a non-adjacent corner.  For example, if you number the boxes 1 to 9, top to bottom, and you start with an X in box 2, O can go in 1, 3, 5, or 8 and be ok.  7 is answered by putting an X in 1, 9 is answered by putting an X in 3.  4 or 6 lets X win by going in 5.  5 is of course an easy draw.  1 and 3 also draw, and would be my move as X could get tricked.  Let's say 3.  If he then goes in 8, he loses as O must go 5, then  X must block with 7, and O then blocks with 9 with 2 ways out, 1 or 6.  Lastly, X in 2 and O in 8 is also a draw, but it's tricky for both players.  If X goes 1 and O goes 3, X better not make the mistake of going 4 or 5 next, they both lose.  If after 2 and 8, X goes 7 or 9, O has only 1 way to avoid getting killed.  He must answer 7 with 1 and 9 with 3.  Most other moves by X lead to a very simple draw.  For example:  X2, O8, X5, O7, X9, O1, X4, O6, X3 is a draw via all forced moves from the 4th move onward.

    Other possible "tricks" that don't work:  X2, O3, we proved that X8 loses.  X4 also loses to O9, X6, O5 and O has 2 ways out.  X2, O3, X6 is ok, after O5, X7, it's an easy draw.  X2, O3, X1 is useless, Just O5, easy draw.  X2, O3, X5, the obvious move, is still just a draw, and transposes to X5, O3, X2, O8 etc.  X2, O3, X7, O9, X6, O5, X1, O4, X8 is easy.  X2, O3, X9 is a last ditch effort with the threat of going in 5 or 8, and so O must play one of those 2 moves.  Otherwise, X wins.

  • 12 months ago · Quote · #8

    plutonia

    If you want to play at a decent level, say around 2000, then an important consideration will be how much opening theory you're willing to study.

    For example, against e4 the Najdorf is one of the most ferocious but there's a lot of theory that you absolutely must know only to survive.

    On the other hand, a defence like the Philidor is more passive, but it's much easier to prepare.

     

    I believe you can play for a win with any opening anyway.

  • 12 months ago · Quote · #9

    marshaltc

    hi my friends,thanks so much.your cms are very helpfulSmile


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