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Why the hypermodern school isn't popular?


  • 7 months ago · Quote · #81

    Yaroslavl

    chessph wrote:

    What is hypermodern? Is it controlling the center indirectly or through long diagonals?

    _____________________________________________________

    Hypermodern chess is advanced chess practice for strong players. Classical chess is more straightforward and intuitive and therefore it is practiced by those weaker players who are still learning how to spot tactics and mating nets on the chessboard.

    In actual chess games Classical and Hypermodern theories are intertwined, mixed together.

    The 2 theories are based on the principle of controlling the center.

    Classical Theory - Control the center (the squares d4,d5,e4,e5) by occupying it with your pawns and pieces.

    Hypermodern Theory - Control the center using the power of your pawns and pieces. With this method you do not create targets in the center for your opponent to attack.

    The following is an example of a clash between Classical Theory and Hypermodern Theory. It is found in the Sicilian Defense. The following moves are a typical move sequence of an opening variation known as the Sicilian Najdorf: 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Be3 e6. Set up a board and play the moves. Then the important thing to notice about the position is that while Black's pawns and pieces are controlling key squares in the center none of them is occupying any central square. Black's pawns at d6, and e6 are not occupying any central squares, yet they are controlling key central squares with their power. Black's N at f6 is controlling key squares in the center with its power, yet it is not occupying a central square. Black is applying the Hypermoden theory of chess in this opening variation.

    By contrast White is applying the Classical theory of chess. Notice that White's pawn at e4 is occupying the central square e4. And, White's N at d4 is occupying the central square d4.

    If you would like to know more, please let me know.

  • 7 months ago · Quote · #82

    waffllemaster

    Hypermodern theory is as follows:  Tarrasch is a big dumb meanie who's bad at chess!

  • 7 months ago · Quote · #83

    thunder_tiger123

    waffllemaster wrote:

    Hypermodern theory is as follows:  Tarrasch is a big dumb meanie who's bad at chess!

    lol

  • 7 months ago · Quote · #84

    Irontiger

    chessph wrote:

    What is hypermodern?

    Getting to the very issue that made this thread 5 pages long, when most posters actually agree with each other.

  • 7 months ago · Quote · #85

    thunder_tiger123

    xD

  • 2 months ago · Quote · #86

    karthi-novice

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 2 months ago · Quote · #87

    Irontiger

    karthi-novice wrote:

    may be because no grandmaster who praticed much of hypermorden achived word champion status

    So you resurrected a 5-months old thread to tell us you have no clue who introduced 1.e4 Nf6 at the top level.

  • 2 months ago · Quote · #88

    karthi-novice

    Irontiger wrote:
    karthi-novice wrote:

    may be because no grandmaster who praticed much of hypermorden achived word champion status

    So you resurrected a 5-months old thread to tell us you have no clue who introduced 1.e4 Nf6 at the top level.

    may be because no grandmaster(except 

    Alekhine

    ) who praticed much of hypermorden achived word champion status

  • 2 months ago · Quote · #89

    TheGreatOogieBoogie

    karthi-novice wrote:

    may be because no grandmaster who praticed much of hypermorden achived word champion status

    Umm, what is 1.e4,Nf6 called?  Why is it called that?  What were Fischer and Kasparov's main replies vs. 1.d4?  (It involes a kingside fianchetto, in fact Fischer had a famous game where he cracked a broad pawn center with the King's Indian and went on to win) What do Petrosian, Karpov and Carlsen's repertoire consists of?  That's right, all played the English and sometimes the Nimzo-Indian. 

  • 2 months ago · Quote · #90

    Sred

    "Hypermodern" openings are very popular. The term "hypermodern" seems out of fashion though, probably because these ideas are totally mainstream these days. I think the term was invented like 100 years ago.

  • 2 months ago · Quote · #91

    SilentKnighte5

    The hyper moderns were all given Ritalin and calmed down.

  • 2 months ago · Quote · #92

    zborg

    Hypermodern was 80 to 90 years ago.  We are all PO-MO, now.

    Postmodernism, all the rage.  So get with the program.  Wink

  • 2 months ago · Quote · #93

    TitanCG

    Nah it's all tactics now. You give yourself a gaping hole on d5 or give up castling rights and just attack lol.

  • 2 months ago · Quote · #94

    FerroMaljinn

    varelse1 wrote:

    Hypermodern openings:

    Nimzo-indian

    Queens Indian

    Gruenfeld

    Alekhine

    What about the above list would you call not popular?

    Alekhine ...

  • 2 months ago · Quote · #95

    Dreaming_Girl

    Many famous musicians in the 19th century remained unknown until 100 years later when people become able to understand their works. Playing hypermodern openings (for example, Reti opening, and King's Indian Attack which differs from KID) need deep understandings about various structures caused by the flexibility of pawns, and it's really difficult for most players to handle these.

  • 2 months ago · Quote · #96

    Dreaming_Girl

    By the way, openings which FerroMaljinn has just listed are not real hypermodern openings, they're just openings which are popular now. As the first comment says, hypermodern openings have special ideas involved, which are against the "tradition" opening ideas.


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