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What is your favorite chess story?


  • 7 years ago · Quote · #1

    GrimReaper7752

    I like good chess stories and the history of chess, I would appreciate any chess stories new or old.

    My favorite or one of them as I have many is:

    Emanuel Lasker and Aron Nimzowitch were playing a game and Lasker had agreed not to smoke his cigars during the game because Nimzo was allergic to smoke. About six or seven moves into the game Lasker pulls out his cigar, bites off the end and puts it in his mouth. Nimzo immediatly jumps up and tells the ref. look he is smoking , the ref. says no it is not lit. to which Nimzo replies ahh but he is threatening to smoke and you as well as anybody else knows that Lasker says the threat is worse than its execution.

  • 7 years ago · Quote · #2

    bigmac30

    playing in a congress i was advized a player was week at a particular opening i palyed said opening got in to a great position then thought to myself how do i play from here and lost so do not deveate from what you know

     

  • 7 years ago · Quote · #3

    ulapayi

    I´d like it, how about this one: Howard Staunton (1840) teacher and good chess player was also the formal dictator of chess in those times, some day a chess player make a write declaration ¨ I won Stauton most of the time¨. When Stauton find him, roar  << YOU DON´T HAVE THE RIGHT TO WRITE SOMTHING LIKE THAT>>, the rival stammer that the declaration was exact, <<FOR SURE THIS IS TRUE, BUT YOU DO NOT HAVE THE RIGHT TO PRINT IT>>say fiercly Stauton.
  • 7 years ago · Quote · #4

    GrimReaper7752

    Nice ones, thank you!

     Akiba Rubenstein was playing in a tournament and had the point lead with one game to go he was playing against Wolf and needed a draw to win the tourney. about 15 moves into the game Wolf offered Rubenstein the draw. Akiba declined and played on till he had a slightly superior position then offered Wolf a draw, which Wolf gladly accepted. After the game Akiba was asked why he declined Wolf's draw offer and then played on till he was winning then offered a draw to Wolf. Rubenstein's reply was with Wolffe I draw when I want to not when he wants to.

     

  • 7 years ago · Quote · #5

    ulapayi

    this one happen to me, I was in Medellin (Colombia) walking to the hotel there was some people plying chess in a bar, I stop to watch and a few time later one of the player asked me if I was interested in play, they were not strong player so I accepted...... then the same player called to JUANITO ( a new one ¡¡¡) and leave the place to juanito and me, wow ¡¡ juanito really play harder and after more than two hours I won in a pown end. After that I used to pass by this bar each night and always juanito invite me to play ..... I never gave him the oportunity Wink
  • 7 years ago · Quote · #6

    LuigiBotha

    I am not sure where this story originates, my father told it once to me to illustrate a point.

    A man was paying a chess master to play against him. Each game end with the master winning. This became a regular appointment and the master was able to supplement his income  handsomely with these games.

    The master eventually said to himself that maybe I should let him win a game, so as not to discourage him and then he might stop playing and I lose this income.

    The next game the master intentionally lost the game. After that the man never invite the master for another game.

    Upon enquiring, the man told the master. I wanted to beat the great master at chess and so I did. I dont need to play anymore games.

     

  • 7 years ago · Quote · #7

    batgirl

    I had read both grimreaper stories but with different players involved.  I would guess, by that, that they are probably apocryphal.
  • 7 years ago · Quote · #8

    batgirl

    Heinrich Wolf, by the way, in his time was considered the King of the Coffee House Players (according to Andor Lillienthal). A picture of Wolf can be seen here.
  • 7 years ago · Quote · #9

    GrimReaper7752

    Thank you good stories! yes there is a good meaning behind that story gomaster, and batgirl I got the one about Emanuel Lasker from Edward Lasker's ( of relation to Em. Lasker )  book 'Chess for fun Chess for blood'

    The Rubenstein one I got from an old Chess life article by Larry Evans.

    Here is one involving Larry Evans him and his friend Anthony Saidy they were playing in a San Antonio tournament in 1972 and Saidy had a winning position. Evans after staying up all night studying the lost position looking for a draw decided the adjourned position was hopeless and booked an early flight home. little did he know that Saidy would blunder on move 46 and than prolong the well known draw to a 106 moves. At move 60 when there was still time to catch the plane, Evans said "It's a book draw" "show me the book" replied Saidy. "I have a schedule to meet" "show me the schedule". With each move the draw became more obvious finally Saidy says" you know it's against the rules to talk to your opponent" "show me the rules!" said Evans after missing the plane and finally drawing the game Saidy says " you know we have played 12 games and it was the first time I was up a pawn against you, I was having to much fun". Me friends and I always when in disagreement over anything use the phrase "show me the book"

    because of this story.

  • 7 years ago · Quote · #10

    GrimReaper7752

    Nice chess blog batgirl, good job. Thanks!
  • 7 years ago · Quote · #11

    batgirl

    "I got the one about Emanuel Lasker from Edward Lasker's ( of relation to Em. Lasker )  book 'Chess for fun Chess for blood'"

     

    pp 31-32

     

     

  • 7 years ago · Quote · #12

    batgirl

    Which one of Morphy? I think I have almost every one.
  • 7 years ago · Quote · #13

    GrimReaper7752

    I found a bunch on MSN image search, I have had internet for only 2 months so I am new to alot of it, I would like one of him playing chess against someone they didnt have any good ones of that kind there.
  • 7 years ago · Quote · #14

    batgirl

    There are several such photos/etchings/drawings on my Morphy site. Some are scattered about but most can be found on this page:  http://sbchess.sinfree.net/gallery.html

     

  • 7 years ago · Quote · #15

    GrimReaper7752

    Thank you very much batgirl, that was delightful. There is a lot of great history in those pictures.
  • 7 years ago · Quote · #16

    batgirl

    Why the interest in pictures of Morphy?

     

  • 7 years ago · Quote · #17

    itaibn

    Tongue outHere is my chess story:

    1.e4 e5

    2.Nf3 f6?

    3.Nxe5! fxe5

    4.Qh5+ Ke7

    5.Qxe5+ Kf7

    6.Bc4+ Kg6

    7.Qf5+ Kh6

    8.d4+ g5

    9.h4 Nf6

    10.hxg5+ Kg7

    11.gxf6+ Qxf6

    12.Bh6+ Qxh6

    13.Qf7#

     

    The moral is, never protect your e pawn with an f pawn.

  • 7 years ago · Quote · #18

    GrimReaper7752

    True but 3.Bc4 is a better move as black can play 3....Qe7 and get counter play.

    True the move 2....f6 is an automatic blunder but I dont think Nxe5 deserves a !. Thank you for the game though.

     

    Batgirl Morphy is my favorite player and I just wanted to see more of them. I had only seen 1 or 2 before today. I also like Karl Schlecter alot too and got to see him for the first time today on the first link you put up.

  • 7 years ago · Quote · #19

    batgirl

  • 7 years ago · Quote · #20

    GrimReaper7752

    Beautiful and again thank you! I like that story too, I have heard it but not with such detail, I like the man's qualities he was a grade "A" human being and a great chess player he is in my top 5 favorites of all time.

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