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The greatest chess move of all time


  • 2 years ago · Quote · #1

    Chessperson77

    The single greatest chess move of all time

    Veselin Topalov vs Alexey Shirov 0-1 
    Gruenfeld Defense: Exchange Variation (D85) 
    During the 1998 Linares chess tournament Shirov played black against Topalov and won with a piece sacrifice in a bishop and pawn ending.

    1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.e4 Nxc3 6.bxc3 Bg7
    7.Bb5+ c6 8.Ba4 O-O 9.Ne2 Nd7 10.O-O e5 11.f3 Qe7 12.Be3 Rd8
    13.Qc2 Nb6 14.Bb3 Be6 15.Rad1 Nc4 16.Bc1 b5 17.f4 exd4 18.Nxd4
    Bg4 19.Rde1 Qc5 20.Kh1 a5 21.h3 Bd7 22.a4 bxa4 23.Ba2 Be8
    24.e5 Nb6 25.f5 Nd5 26.Bd2 Nb4 27.Qxa4 Nxa2 28.Qxa2 Bxe5
    29.fxg6 hxg6 30.Bg5 Rd5 31.Re3 Qd6 32.Qe2 Bd7 33.c4 Bxd4
    34.cxd5 Bxe3 35.Qxe3 Re8 36.Qc3 Qxd5 37.Bh6 Re5 38.Rf3 Qc5
    39.Qa1 Bf5 40.Re3 f6 41.Rxe5 Qxe5 42.Qa2+ Qd5 43.Qxd5+ cxd5
    44.Bd2 a4 45.Bc3 Kf7 46.h4 Ke6 47.Kg1 Bh3!!! 48.gxh3 Kf5 49.Kf2
    Ke4 50.Bxf6 d4 51.Be7 Kd3 52.Bc5 Kc4 53.Be7 Kb3 0-1

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #2

    jetfighter13

    No Levitski Marshall 1912

    23.... Qg3!!!!

    the move is complete perfection

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #3

    Chessperson77

    Thank you for your feedback

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #4

    chessaddictress

    Jelic11:  I found the found the greatest move of all time on my own!  That's what the Tactics Trainer will do for you!  For me, it was the simple principle of creating a situation where there are three passed pawns, with two on opposite sides of the board and white not having enough means to stop all three. 

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #5

    Polar_Bear

    Tal vs Hjartarson 1987: 36. Rc5!! +-

    Mikenas vs Bronstein 1965: 24. ... Rxa3!! 0-1

    Larsen vs Spassky 1970: 12. ... h4!! and 14. ... Rh1!! -+

    Pillsbury vs Lasker 1895: 18. ... Ra3!! -+

    Bronstein vs Korchnoi 1962: 39. Rxh6+!! 1-0

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #6

    truhusdh

    That move certainly ranks amongst the great moves of:

    Pillsbury vs Gunsberg, 1895 - 27.f5!! This was the last round of the Hastings tournament and Pillsbury was leading by half a point and was playing for a draw until he heard Chigorin won the last round.

    Rotlewi vs Rubinstein, 1907 - from 20. ... Ng4! to the end is just surreal, climaxing at Rd2!!

    Réti vs Tartakower, 1910 - 9.Qd8+!! This game is rightly known as the 'sucker punch.'

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #7

    waffllemaster

    I've heard some strong players praise Topolov's move, but IMO the position really suggests it and especially for a GM shoudln't be a hard move to find.

    Some attacking games by Shirov and Topolov though are really amazing.  Sometimes they don't get back the material for a long time and the attack isn't clear at all, but they're winning anyway.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #8

    waffllemaster

    Polar_Bear wrote:

    Tal vs Hjartarson 1987: 36. Rc5!! +-

    Mikenas vs Bronstein 1965: 24. ... Rxa3!! 0-1

    Larsen vs Spassky 1970: 12. ... h4!! and 14. ... Rh1!! -+

    Pillsbury vs Lasker 1895: 18. ... Ra3!! -+

    Bronstein vs Korchnoi 1962: 39. Rxh6+!! 1-0


    The two highlighted ones were my favorite of the 8 links so far.

    Some great moves give you the feeling "I could find this move" or at least "I somewhat understand this move"

    And others all you can say is "wow"

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #9

    Here_Is_Plenty

    Byrne-Fischer where he sacs the queen was called "The Game Of The Century", apart from anything else he must have seen it a few moves before he even offers the queen based on what he has done.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #10

    RetGuvvie98

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 2 years ago · Quote · #11

    wishiwonthatone

    Well you guys got me curious, so I looked this up in the chess.com database, but there are precisely 14,916 games between "byrne-fischer". Which is the one you are referring to?

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #12

    RetGuvvie98

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 2 years ago · Quote · #13

    waffllemaster

    It's hard to believe he was only 13.  The logic of the idea and accuracy of the moves is absolutely ruthless.  It's no surprise he went on to become a world champ.


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