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Advanced Endgame Study


  • 7 years ago · Quote · #1

    ZZBrandon

    I would like to start studying advanced endgame positions and learn more about endgames, is there any good sites or resources that anyone could reccomend to me.

  • 7 years ago · Quote · #2

    tbirdtird

    The best free way to study endgames is to study the games of top players that made it to the end game.  www.chessgames.com and " target="_blank">www.chesslive.de/  both have a large databases, but chessgames might be better for your purpose since it lists the number of moves--not that a certin move number indicates an endgame but this is at least a starting point.


  • 7 years ago · Quote · #3

    Masky

    i suck at endgames, and havent yet found a website or anything where to learn properly what its all about


  • 7 years ago · Quote · #4

    likesforests

    There's a myth out there that endings are difficult or boring to study. It doesn't have to be that way! A good place to begin are the lessons here:

     

     The King and Queen Checkmate

    The King and Rook Checkmate

    Pawn Endings 1

    Pawn Endings 2

    Pawn Endings 3

    Queen Endings

    Rook Endings

    Minor Piece Endings

    Endgame Studies

     

    Afterwards, you'll be ready for a good endgame book such as those by Pandolfini, Seirawan, or Silman. And, of course, check out my blog! You're at the beginning of a long and enjoyable journey. :)


  • 7 years ago · Quote · #5

    likesforests

    The original poster mentioned, "advanced endgame positions". If the above is too basic for you, here are some more advanced options. These assume you know the above!

     

     1. "Starting Out: Pawn Endings", "Starting Out: Rook Endings", "Starting Out: Minor Piece Endings", and "Starting Out: Practical Endings" make for a nice series of books. They take it slow and cover a wide variety of positions. 

     

    2. Dvoretsky's Endgame Manual is awesome. Dvoretsky defines an endgame as a position where one side has at most one piece, and within that definition he provides a thorough coverage of practical endings.

     

    3. Fundamental Chess Endings by Mueller and Lamprecht is also excellent and takes a wider view of endgames. In addition to hitting the material in Dvoretsky, he covers some rare endings (K+N+N vs K+P), as well as complex practical endings such as K+R+N+Ps vs K+R+B+Ps.

     

    After studying endgame positions and techniques from the above, players turn to Endgame Strategy. Shereshevsky, and Hansen are well-regarded.


  • 7 years ago · Quote · #6

    ZZBrandon

    Thank you for all of your help I will try and take a look at the material you have mentioned... :)

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