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Is this impossible to win?


  • 22 months ago · Quote · #21

    madhacker

    Yeah, true, I didn't mean you had to get the opposition, only that if you've got it you've definitely won.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #23

    SmyslovFan

    Post 12 correctly states the rule for determining who's winning from this position. It's very strange that the same person who posted that rule then said the position in post 15 was a draw if it were black to move.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #24

    Scottrf

    SmyslovFan wrote:

    Post 12 correctly states the rule for determining who's winning from this position. It's very strange that the same person who posted that rule then said the position in post 15 was a draw if it were black to move.

    I think post 12 should say 5th rank, not 6th.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #25

    InfiniteFlash

    madhacker wrote:

    Basically what it boils down to is that if you can gain the opposition with the king in front of the pawn then you win. I can't think of any position where that doesn't hold true.

    This doesn't really apply at all in fact, but its an important one to know.

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

    no matter whose move it is black draws unfortunately.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #26

    madhacker

    Post #25, the king isn't in front of the pawn in that position.

    Post #22, D'oh!

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #27

    InfiniteFlash

    madhacker wrote:

    Post #25, the king isn't in front of the pawn in that position.

    Post #22, D'oh!

    uh i even said it doesnt apply at all.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #28

    SmyslovFan

    Scottrf wrote:
    SmyslovFan wrote:

    Post 12 correctly states the rule for determining who's winning from this position. It's very strange that the same person who posted that rule then said the position in post 15 was a draw if it were black to move.

    I think post 12 should say 5th rank, not 6th.

    Actually, if change we change condition #3 in post #12 from pawn on 6th rank to King on 6th rank it's right. 

    But can you think of a position, not involving rook pawns and not hanging the pawn, where "white" has a pawn on the 6th rank, and one of the other two conditions are met and it's NOT a win?

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #29

    SmyslovFan

    Randommemory's post #25 is interesting because if you move it all over one file, you get a very instructive win for white.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #30

    waffllemaster

    Here's a fun one to test your knowledge.  Taking the opposition is a draw.  1.Ke5 is the only way to win. 

    Similarly if the white king is already on e5 then black to move can only draw by placing his king on f7 and if instead he took the opposition then he loses.

     

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #31

    Scottrf

    SmyslovFan wrote:
    Scottrf wrote:
    SmyslovFan wrote:

    Post 12 correctly states the rule for determining who's winning from this position. It's very strange that the same person who posted that rule then said the position in post 15 was a draw if it were black to move.

    I think post 12 should say 5th rank, not 6th.

    Actually, if change we change condition #3 in post #12 from pawn on 6th rank to King on 6th rank it's right. 

    But can you think of a position, not involving rook pawns and not hanging the pawn, where "white" has a pawn on the 6th rank, and one of the other two conditions are met and it's NOT a win?

    Yes. I wasn't defending his rule in the first place though, just suggested the mistake he may have made.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #32

    SmyslovFan

    The position in post 30 is both quite famous and famously difficult. The winning plan for white against best play is to bring the K to e8 and outflank Blac via g8. There are several "only" moves in that scenario.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #33

    SmyslovFan

    This puzzle, composed by D. Hooper (1961), is an extremely complex version of the puzzle found in post 30. 

    In order to solve it fully, one has to work out a series of corresponding squares. It normally takes hours to work it out. 

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #34

    waffllemaster

    It's amazing how seemingly simple positions can contain so much difficulty.  It's a wonder we can play most positions as well as we do.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #35

    Elubas

    Indeed. I just embrace it, knowing any position is a puzzle to solve -- who needs a sudoku book when you have a chess position. Chess improvement is a journey that never loses freshness for me.


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