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Annotating One's Own Games


  • 5 years ago · Quote · #1

    Arv123

    A good way to increase your chess playing skills is to annotate your own game and publish it. Here is one of my recent tournament games. Comments on game are appreciated,


    Because this game was so instructive, I learnt a few lessons about chess. Here they are.

    Lessons Learnt:

     

    1. When a position is a draw keep playing for a win, because you just might get it.
    2. A good chess player is always lucky.


  • 5 years ago · Quote · #2

    brandonQDSH

    Arv123

    Nice game and annotations, although a little too much needless annotations in the opening. 2. Nc6 is hardly "daring" and follows the classical rules of development (control the center, develop minor pieces, Knights before Bishops, etc.), as opposed to the Center Counter (Scandinavian), which exposes the Queen to early attack by White.

    I'm glad White won, as you had a very nice advantage going into the endgame. Not only did you have the good Knight to Black's bad Bishop as you mentioned, but you also had a Kingside pawn majority, which is the key to the position. White's 3 pawns are enough to hold the position so that Black's 4 pawns mean nothing.

    "Draw-ISH" positions are not the same as draws though. Yes, after the exchange of minor pieces, Black regains equality: trading off his bad piece and un-doubling his pawns. Played correctly, the position will most likely be drawn. But against lower-rated players, and even higher rated players, if you know your endgame and have good tactical skills, you can win, as you did. 

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #3

    kco

    @brandon would after 16....Rxd4 would it be better 17.cxd4 instead of Rxd4 ? that would created a nice central or connected  pawn ?

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #4

    Arv123

    If Black is playing for a draw, which he is, Rxd4 would lead to exchanging rooks in the endgame, which is good when playing for a draw.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #5

    Scarblac

    Arv123 wrote:

    If Black is playing for a draw, which he is, Rxd4 would lead to exchanging rooks in the endgame, which is good when playing for a draw.


    Not necessarily. Rook endgames are often very drawish, pawn endgames much less so.

    If white manages to go into a pawn endgame where he has a winning 4vs3 on the kingside and a drawing 3vs4 on the queenside (because the doubled pawns make it impossible to create a passed pawn for black), then white wins. So black needs to keep pieces on the board.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #6

    Arv123

    Scarblac,

    I believe worded what I was trying to say wrong. What I meant was, both sides get equal chances.

    I am sorry for any misunderstandings. 

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #7

    Arv123

    brandonQDSH wrote:

    Arv123

    Nice game and annotations, although a little too much needless annotations in the opening. 2. Nc6 is hardly "daring" and follows the classical rules of development (control the center, develop minor pieces, Knights before Bishops, etc.), as opposed to the Center Counter (Scandinavian), which exposes the Queen to early attack by White.

     

     

    What I meant by "daring" was that Black needs to be willing to study a lot of openings, unlike the center counter.

    Once again, sorry for misunderstandings.


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