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Developing a position that looks cool, good idea!?


  • 20 months ago · Quote · #1

    Seraphimity

    In the following diagram I had played black.  White developed both bishops in a two move step put them on d3,e3 with knigts to d2,e2.  I was left to wonder what was to defend the castle?  Pixie dust and magic faery?

    Is white's position Valid.  I am a relative amatuer and have no engine and thought white's position looked rather formidable.  I'm curious if anyone finds white' position to be sound, or is this just a nice to look at symmetrical assembly.  

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #2

    blueemu

    Typically, positions with the Bishops developed symmetrically... e3 and d3, f4 and c4, g5 and b5... are not particularly solid. An exception is the double-fianchetto with Bishops at g2 and b2, which can be quite resiliant given a good central formation.

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #3

    Seraphimity

    blueemu wrote:

    Typically, positions with the Bishops developed symmetrically... e3 and d3, f4 and c4, g5 and b5... are not particularly solid. An exception is the double-fianchetto with Bishops at g2 and b2, which can be quite resiliant given a good central formation.

    Although I don't personally think double-fianchetto is a good formation I confess I struggle againts it in play.  The idea of commiting both the b and g pawn early and the extra step's to develop the bishop without a direct purpose doesn't do it for me.  

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #4

    blueemu

    There is a direct purpose... it gives you Bishop-control of e4, d4, e5 and d5. No other formation will offer that so early in the game.

    Having said that... I don't often play the double-fianchetto either.

  • 16 months ago · Quote · #5

    Idrinkyourhealth

    white will drown into a pusy , but black will win the game. all depends of if you are omosexual or not. <º))))<<( .I.


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