Upgrade to Chess.com Premium!

Exchange-Sac evaluation


  • 23 months ago · Quote · #1

    JamieKowalski

    Hi all,

    I love positional exchange sacs, but I have to admit I'm always nervous when the opportunity comes up for me, and often settle for a more timid positional move. In the below game, I think I made a pretty good one, but I'd like some other analysis/opinions.

    My computer likes the move I chose 23... Rxb4, but slightly prefers Rbb8. I chose to make the sac because it gave me a very clear plan -- push the connected pawns and try for a squeeze play. What would you have played?

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #2

    JamieKowalski

    Thanks, Powerlevel, I appreciate your taking a look.

    I didn't feel the exchange was forced. Rb8 looks very playable, though not as interesting of course!

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #3

    hicetnunc

    Looks like a textbook example of these exchange sacs. As you say it gives you clear play and white is the one who has to be careful, so very certainly a good move Smile

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #4

    -waller-

    Definitely a good one! I would always play the exchange sac here (I love playing them too), you get a minor piece and a pawn for the exchange, plus two connected passers on the side of the board where you are stronger. I think the main thing is that White already has a "weakness" on e4 and his pieces are uncoordinated - by giving him this other thing to deal with his position just collapses under the pressure.

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #6

    Scottrf

    Exchange sacrifices just aren't in my locker, would have to be very obvious for me to even consider it.

    Any good reference materials for them, or is it an experience/judgement thing mainly?

    Perhaps playing through master games when they have done them is good?

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #8

    Scottrf

    Thanks.

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #9

    JamieKowalski

    Bonsey,

    I had to be careful about pushing them too far right away. For example, an early push to b3 allowed White's knight to go to c3 blocking the c pawn and covering b1. At the same time, an early push to c3 allowed a return of material via Nxc3, bxc3, Rxc3, and the pawns are gone. I think tying him down further was a good idea.

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #10

    mateologist

    I like it because white is forced to give up his "good" bishop of his bishop pair and the creation of


    the two connected passed pawns, looks like a tough day at the office for white. Here is a game that the exchange-sac brings down the curtain !

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #12

    transpo

    Post

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #13

    Steinar

    I think the exchange sacrifice was a mistake in this case. How would you meet a white f4 instead of the weaker Qa1? Black has a comfortable advantage after Rbb8 and start working on re-routing the offside knight. What happens after Rxb4 is too unclear compared to this clear advantageous alternaltive.

    Black has a number of good plans here revolving around the square b3 and rerouting the offside knight. It's harder for white to find good roles for his pieces, especially the bishop.

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #14

    Steinar

    Too quick post! I had my tactics messed up and it turns out white is fine, he can just exchange his bishop for the knight and it's pretty much a dead draw. I have a blind spot for giving up the bishop pair sometimes and forgot to consider the move.

    I guess the exchange sac is a good try, and the only way to press for an advantage then, but I still think it's unclear where it's headed with best play.

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #15

    transpo

    Steinar wrote:

    I think the exchange sacrifice was a mistake in this case. How would you meet a white f4 instead of the weaker Qa1? Black has a comfortable advantage after Rbb8 and start working on re-routing the offside knight. What happens after Rxb4 is too unclear compared to this clear advantageous alternaltive.

    Black has a number of good plans here revolving around the square b3 and rerouting the offside knight. It's harder for white to find good roles for his pieces, especially the bishop.

    _____________________________________________________________________________________________

    Thank you Steinar. The silicone beast is right again with 23...Rbb8.

    You saved me from writing a long post. My obsession with this game has always been being able to get at the "truth" of the position. To me it is an elixir. Well done Steinar!

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #16

    mateologist

    Steinar wrote:

    Too quick post! I had my tactics messed up and it turns out white is fine, he can just exchange his bishop for the knight and it's pretty much a dead draw. I have a blind spot for giving up the bishop pair sometimes and forgot to consider the move.

    I guess the exchange sac is a good try, and the only way to press for an advantage then, but I still think it's unclear where it's headed with best play.

    Seems very strong players (Masters) definately will not part with those Bishop Pairs until they have calculated your Demise ! Frown That is one of the reasons i like this exchange sack because it forces white to give up the "good" bishop in his pair. But as you said even with best play as far as one can calculate things remain unclear.

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #17

    JamieKowalski

    top2pr wrote:

    Well since you didn't bother to (click: board coordinates) I wont bother to run it.

    It keeps the riff-raff out.

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #18

    JamieKowalski

    @Steinar & transpo,

    As I mentioned, my engine (Critter) did prefer Rbb8, but not by much. It still evaluated my move as about a quarter-pawn advantage to Black after given a very long think (around 29 plies, I believe). The difference was negligable between the two choices. I might do a position shoot-out in Fritz to see what happens down the road in some of these variations. 


Back to Top

Post your reply: