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Forgetting piece is threatened!


  • 5 months ago · Quote · #21

    kleelof

    I have become a strong believer in this.

    I just recently began playing 5/0 games and I am always seeing things I learned from my play in Online Chess.

  • 5 months ago · Quote · #22

    mrhjornevik

    Yaroslavl wrote:
    slowlybutsurely79 wrote:
    LesuhAn wrote:

    You are not alone. Lately, I try to do a last minute safety check, which often reveals what I'd forgotten.

    It's the thinking pattern I need to adjust I guess. On a humorous note, yesterday I was playing on my phone on chess.com and meant rook to say g6 and by mistake I hit G5 losing me the game! I wasn't pleased at all :) !

    Chess requires a disciplined thinking pattern.  Two steps towards a disciplined thinking pattern are:

    1. Sit on your hands  when  playing a  game.  This will  require that you play standard time control games of 2 hours or more.  Playing  rapid transit games is  harmful to your game  at your level.  If you  would like to know why strong players play rapid transit please let me know.

    2. Write a Before I Make A Move List.  Check each item on the list 2x before making a move.   An item on that list should be:  Do I or my  opponent have an  undefended piece or pawn in the present position or in the position after my move.  After repeated use of the list you will have memorized it and it will be your thinking pattern.

     


     

    Two hour games are long . You can sit on you hands on shorter intervalls as well. I get that pros counting ten moves ahead need that much more time, but even Carlsen said "if you see me thinking for more then 10 minutes there is a big chance I already found the move, but I keep thinking in sirkles only harming my own game" (its translated, but you get the idea". 

    A big part of a neb playing the game is "feeling" where the pice should go, start to think and you may beigin to make moves to clever for your own good. Once in a otb match I found such a beutifull fork between the queen and king I missed a mate in two. If I had continued to play "dumb" I would have won. 

  • 5 months ago · Quote · #23

    Irontiger

    slowlybutsurely79 wrote:
    Irontiger wrote:

    That "problem" will stick for a long time, but hopefully become less and less important. After some practice you don't actively look for threatened pieces, you see them without consciously looking for them.

    Hope you're right.

    Oh, just to make it clear: although it will become more or less subconscious later on, you still have to actively do the job before it turns into routine.

    You will improve very slowly (if at all) playing random moves and hoping for the best.

  • 5 months ago · Quote · #24

    Yaroslavl

    mrhjornevik wrote:

    A big part of a neb playing the game is "feeling" where the pice should go, start to think and you may beigin to make moves to clever for your own good. Once in a otb match I found such a beutifull fork between the queen and king I missed a mate in two. If I had continued to play "dumb" I would have won. 

    ________________________________________________________________

    There are 5 visualization pattern memory banks that every strong player has built into her/his brain over  several years.  The Mating Net visualization pattern memory bank would have caused the mating net that you mention in the game you played, to seemingly  jump up off the board and smack you on the forehead in a flash!  So more than likely you did not  have a good mating net visualization pattern memory bank when you played that game.  Visualization Pattern Memory Banks have to be built with lots of practice. 

    The best way to build a strong mating net visualization pattern memory bank is to practice (K+Q vs. K, K+R vs. K, K+2B vs. K, K+B+N vs. K) until you can  do them in your sleep. 

  • 5 months ago · Quote · #25

    mhia21

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 5 months ago · Quote · #26

    mrhjornevik

    Yaroslavl wrote:

    mrhjornevik wrote:

    A big part of a neb playing the game is "feeling" where the pice should go, start to think and you may beigin to make moves to clever for your own good. Once in a otb match I found such a beutifull fork between the queen and king I missed a mate in two. If I had continued to play "dumb" I would have won. 

    ________________________________________________________________

    There are 5 visualization pattern memory banks that every strong player has built into her/his brain over  several years.  The Mating Net visualization pattern memory bank would have caused the mating net that you mention in the game you played, to seemingly  jump up off the board and smack you on the forehead in a flash!  So more than likely you did not  have a good mating net visualization pattern memory bank when you played that game.  Visualization Pattern Memory Banks have to be built with lots of practice. 

    The best way to build a strong mating net visualization pattern memory bank is to practice (K+Q vs. K, K+R vs. K, K+2B vs. K, K+B+N vs. K) until you can  do them in your sleep. 

    by the time I have even learned how to pronounce "visualization pattern memory banks" Im no longer a noob :P

  • 5 months ago · Quote · #27

    Yaroslavl

    It is a good idea to build these memory banks.  You will see tremendous improvement in your game.  If you don't  it would be a good idea to learn how to pronounce wooodpushing patzer.

  • 5 months ago · Quote · #28

    General-Mayhem

    Yaroslavl wrote:

    It is a good idea to build these memory banks.  You will see tremendous improvement in your game.  If you don't  it would be a good idea to learn how to pronounce wooodpushing patzer.

    But watch out for the notorious memorybank-robbers! 

  • 5 months ago · Quote · #29

    I_Am_Second

    slowlybutsurely79 wrote:

    Hi Everyone,

    I've noticed that from time to time, I have a piece that is threatened and I forget all about it and lose it!

    What happens is that I know it's threatened, then my mind starts analysing other moves and I forget that my piece was originally threatened and lose it!

    It's really frustrating, the following game is the latest example, it's my penultimate move. Any ideas how I can overcome it? Does anyone have/had this problem?

     

    Thanks

    Dennis


    Ask yourself 3 questions:

    Do I have any checks or check mates?

    Can i capture any of my opponents pieces?

    Can my opponent capture any of my pieces?

    You look at every possible check...checkmate...capture (Even the bad ones)  What this will do is force you to look at the entire board. 

  • 5 months ago · Quote · #30

    slowlybutsurely79

    I_Am_Second wrote:
    slowlybutsurely79 wrote:

    Hi Everyone,

    I've noticed that from time to time, I have a piece that is threatened and I forget all about it and lose it!

    What happens is that I know it's threatened, then my mind starts analysing other moves and I forget that my piece was originally threatened and lose it!

    It's really frustrating, the following game is the latest example, it's my penultimate move. Any ideas how I can overcome it? Does anyone have/had this problem?

     

    Thanks

    Dennis


    Ask yourself 3 questions:

    Do I have any checks or check mates?

    Can i capture any of my opponents pieces?

    Can my opponent capture any of my pieces?

    You look at every possible check...checkmate...capture (Even the bad ones)  What this will do is force you to look at the entire board. 

    I agree, but for this to be drilled in my head, I need to stop playing live chess and only play online. It's what I'll be trying to do.


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