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Game analysis please


  • 2 years ago · Quote · #21

    A-Salty-Dog

    transpo wrote:

    Yes. The book is titled, "Pawn Power In Chess", by Hans Kmoch. Beginning on pg. 107 the diagrams for these characteristic pawn formations are illustrated and explained in detail.

    I would recommend that you begin with page 107 to read and study through to the end of the book. Referring to earlier pages only as you need to for definitions of terminology and jargon. And, explanations of concepts and ideas.

    You can purchase the book for $15 at Amazon.com or Barnes & Noble.com

    I did look it up on Amazon. I soon discovered that the book is not available in algebraic notation - is this so? Or has some edition come out with algebraic?

    I realize that descriptive is not hard to learn if you don't know it. My qualm is that I am very rusty in it, and having to deal with descriptive at the same time as I am dealing with new concepts is tough.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #22

    AndyClifton

    Ugh, stay away from Pawn Power!  Lest ye be jargoned to death.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #23

    waffllemaster

    transpo wrote:

    A student familiar with the 6 characteristic pawn structures that result from almost every opening would recognize after Black's 12...d5 the characteristic pawn structure known as the Free Formation.  No pawns across the middle line of the board, a pawn lever (pawn break probability - White pawn at e4, Black pawn at d5).  He would remember that Rs are meekly dependent on levers and rams to create inroads (half-open and open files) into the enemy position.  He would also be aware of the backwardness of his c-pawn on a half-open file.  He would realize that the solution to both problems is the execution of the pawn break by playing 13.exd5. With this move White has altered the pawn structure to favor White no matter what response Black chooses.  He would also realize if he even considered 13.e5 that it creates a ram (White pawn e5, Black pawn e6) and it is unclear how to prepare the future f5 lever (pawn break).  In addition it grants Black a protected half-free pawn passer at d5, and the backward pawn at c2 on a half-open file problem remains.
    Of course it goes without stating that the problem of recognizing that White's pawn at f2 needs defending after Black's 13...Ng4, would never come up. 


    So he finds exd5 but drops a knight later and loses.  See what I mean?  Tactics and dropped pieces come up all the time.  Pawn structure choices, although important, come up infrequently.  Not dropping pieces comes first.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #24

    AndyClifton

    Yea, verily before the phalanx God hath placed the hang. Smile

    On the plus side, I do like the Procol Harum guy.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #25

    transpo

    waffllemaster wrote:

    transpo wrote:

    A student familiar with the 6 characteristic pawn structures that result from almost every opening would recognize after Black's 12...d5 the characteristic pawn structure known as the Free Formation.  No pawns across the middle line of the board, a pawn lever (pawn break probability - White pawn at e4, Black pawn at d5).  He would remember that Rs are meekly dependent on levers and rams to create inroads (half-open and open files) into the enemy position.  He would also be aware of the backwardness of his c-pawn on a half-open file.  He would realize that the solution to both problems is the execution of the pawn break by playing 13.exd5. With this move White has altered the pawn structure to favor White no matter what response Black chooses.  He would also realize if he even considered 13.e5 that it creates a ram (White pawn e5, Black pawn e6) and it is unclear how to prepare the future f5 lever (pawn break).  In addition it grants Black a protected half-free pawn passer at d5, and the backward pawn at c2 on a half-open file problem remains.

    Of course it goes without stating that the problem of recognizing that White's pawn at f2 needs defending after Black's 13...Ng4, would never come up. 

    So he finds exd5 but drops a knight later and loses.  See what I mean?  Tactics and dropped pieces come up all the time.  Pawn structure choices, although important, come up infrequently.  Not dropping pieces comes first.

    ______________________________________________________________________________________________

    Oh, you are writing about the written list that every player carries with her/him. The one generically titled:

    Things I MUST do before I make a move

    1.Sit on my hands whenever I am seated at the board or in front of the computer screen.

    2.WHAT IS MY OPPONENT'S THREAT(S)

    3. REMEMBER pieces can move backwards. Does my opponent have any backward captures possible before or after the move I am considering.

    4. ...

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #26

    AndyClifton

    4.  Burger King or Carl's Jr after the round?

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #27

    transpo

    A-Salty-Dog wrote:

    transpo wrote:

    Yes. The book is titled, "Pawn Power In Chess", by Hans Kmoch. Beginning on pg. 107 the diagrams for these characteristic pawn formations are illustrated and explained in detail.

    I would recommend that you begin with page 107 to read and study through to the end of the book. Referring to earlier pages only as you need to for definitions of terminology and jargon. And, explanations of concepts and ideas.

    You can purchase the book for $15 at Amazon.com or Barnes & Noble.com

    I did look it up on Amazon. I soon discovered that the book is not available in algebraic notation - is this so? Or has some edition come out with algebraic?

    I realize that descriptive is not hard to learn if you don't know it. My qualm is that I am very rusty in it, and having to deal with descriptive at the same time as I am dealing with new concepts is tough.

    ______________________________________________________________________________________________

    Descriptive Notation is simple. Board is divided into K-side and Q-side. Squares are numbered 1-8 from each opponent's side of the board. As you face the board from your side squares are labeled from left to right QR1-8, QN1-8, etc. The abbreviation for Knight in Descriptive is (Kt).

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #28

    A-Salty-Dog

    AndyClifton wrote:

    Yea, verily before the phalanx God hath placed the hang. 

    On the plus side, I do like the Procol Harum guy.

    Thank you! Shine On Brightly!

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #29

    A-Salty-Dog

    Transpo wrote: Descriptive Notation is simple. Board is divided into K-side and Q-side. Squares are numbered 1-8 from each opponent's side of the board. As you face the board from your side squares are labeled from left to right QR1-8, QN1-8, etc. The abbreviation for Knight in Descriptive is (Kt).

    I believe I did point out that I know descriptive Cool My complaint remains...it is difficulty piled on top of difficulty to use descriptive AND master new material.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #30

    transpo

    A-Salty-Dog wrote:

    Transpo wrote: Descriptive Notation is simple. Board is divided into K-side and Q-side. Squares are numbered 1-8 from each opponent's side of the board. As you face the board from your side squares are labeled from left to right QR1-8, QN1-8, etc. The abbreviation for Knight in Descriptive is (Kt).

    I believe I did point out that I know descriptive My complaint remains...it is difficulty piled on top of difficulty to use descriptive AND master new material.

    It's ok Salty. I understand. Everything is good.

    If I can help let me know how.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #31

    A-Salty-Dog

    Cool Trans! Appreciate it!

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #32

    max30000

    Thank you guys for u analysis. Also Thanks Richard for your help Tongue Out

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #33

    varelse1

    I attmpted to order PPiC recently though Barnes and Noble. I was told it is out of print.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #34

    max30000

    ok, thank you hoynck and varelse1

  • 13 months ago · Quote · #35

    Mark_Chang

    No Mistakes for me :)


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