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How to figure the last piece standing in a typical exchange?


  • 6 years ago · Quote · #1

    okmrbill

    Yes...you have six pieces pointed and covering at the d6 ...and your opponent has seven pieces pointed at the d6 pawn...shoot the whole force or back off because it's not in your favor....it doesn't always play out the way you thought (using analysis board)...so whats the trick... if your not the last man standing ...is it a bad trade-down-exchange?  What quick rule-of-thumb do the better players apply??

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #2

    ednorton

    I'd look for away to divert the attention from the d6 to a square that favors me. A shoot out as you describe seems (to me) like a near empty board with my position a piece down. Not good.

    I'd look for a fork or check or a way of forcing one of my opponents pieces to a weak square.

    Is there a pin available?

    A quiet move?

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #3

    okmrbill

    ednorton wrote:

    I'd look for away to divert the attention from the d6 to a square that favors me. A shoot out as you describe seems (to me) like a near empty board with my position a piece down. Not good.

    I'd look for a fork or check or a way of forcing one of my opponents pieces to a weak square.

    Is there a pin available?

    A quiet move?


     I usually do...it's the exchange i get drawn into that doesn't go in my favor...i just wondered how others considered their particular choices... my real ambition is to shift focus from an overburdened piece...the exchanges seldom go to my favor....I with your advice on the quiet move approach.

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #4

    woodencardboard

    I always run through the board position assuming everyone puts all their pieces in. Then, while doing that, I make sure he doesn't have any damaging intermediate moves. If the position is not favorable to me, I usually try to punish him somehow for using that tempo to capture whatever square the forces are all built up on. Like a gambit in the middle of a game, I guess.

    And if that's not possible I do what ednorton suggests.

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #5

    vagamundo

    when there's tension in one square, usually one of the pieces attacking it is one that can hold the others (like a knight, which doesn't represent a direct attack). When the attack gets to the knight positioning, it's best to keep it defended & attack another flank. A couple of months ago I was in this position & instead of doing this, I kept attacking & in the end, lost pieces & positioning...

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #6

    ednorton

    I guess, for a mere mortal...meaning myself....I try and simplify things by evaluating the exchange. If the exchange costs me a piece and a loss of tempo, well...I'm not gonna bite. If the exchange costs me a piece, but leaves me on the move...maybe there is a little light at the end of the tunnel.

    What I have been learning  as I have moved up the ranks from 1200 to 1400 is that at 1400, if I am a piece and a pawn down...my opponent is gonna toast me. Its just a matter of time.  And I resign. (sometimes)


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