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Instructive loss, would appreciate feedback.


  • 19 months ago · Quote · #41

    transpo

    KingsEye wrote:

    Transpo,

    I don't see how 3e3 is better than 3.Nf3 to me, there are a lot of options to play, 3.c4, 3.e3, 3.Nc3 and of course 3. Nf3. I generally choose 3.Nf3 because I try to keep my queen side undeveloped long enough to see how black is planning to set up his structure. I usually end up playing 4. e3, so maybe you can explain why playing e3 is better a move earlier, I don't understand why it would be.

    As for 3. Nf3 Bg4 4. Ne5- I haven't even considered that before, mostly because I try to avoid moving a piece more than one in the opening stage if I can help it. It does move a piece twice but it looks like black has to move his bishop too because Nxg4 Nxg4 e4! with tempo seems to give white a clear edge with center and bishop pair. Thanks for that tip!

    As for 3. Nf3 Bg4 4. Ne5- I haven't even considered that before, mostly because I try to avoid moving a piece more than one in the opening stage if I can help it. It does move a piece twice but it looks like black has to move his bishop too because Nxg4 Nxg4 e4! with tempo seems to give white a clear edge with center and bishop pair. Thanks for that tip!

    All very good insightful observations.  But, remember what I posted:  pawn structure holds everything under its remote control

    The most important aspect of the pawn structure in your game is the ram at d4,d5.  The center is  blocked and that is a strong indication that flank attacks should not only be analyzed but that they have a very good chance of succeding because the center is blocked.  If the center is open or fluid flank attack attacks are very likely to fail because your opponent can counterattack in the center.  If the center is blocked there is no counterattacking the center. The best counter measure to stop, thwart a flank attack is to counterattack in the center.

       Now see if you can analyze the position after 4.Ne5 and post some variations and word explanations of what is likely to ensue in this game.

    One last thing, the 3 concepts will let you know when an exception to the general opening principles (do not move developed pieces more than once in the opening stage) applies.

    I chose to address the second part of your post because it is the best lead into explaining what is going in this game.

    I will explain to you why 2.e3 is better than 2.Nf3 with my next post.

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #42

    transpo

    Why 2.e3 is in most ways better than 2.Nf3:

    First, some background explanation--

    Winning chess is the strategically/tactically correct advance of the pawn mass. The main reason that this principle works is that pawns cannot move backwards

    In your game as White in your quest to control your half (d4, e4) of the center (d4,e4,d5,e5) you have presently secured d4 with the Q at d1. E4 is presently controlled by Black twice by his pawn at d5 and his N at f6. In order to regain control of e4 White must bring B at f1 to d3, his N at b1 to c3 or d2, his Q at d1 to c2, and possibly his p at f2 to f3. There is an alternate plan to regain control of e4 that involves the pawn break c4. I will leave it to you to post the moves for the alternate plan. The general idea when you are combining Classical Opening Theory with Hypermodern Opening Theory is you control the central squares nearest your position first. Only after those squares are under your control do you make plans to fight for control of d5 and e5. Granted e4 is presently controlled by Black, and e5 is presently controlled by White.

    As in war because of logistics you gain control of the ground nearest your army's position first before attacking to gain control of ground farther forward on the field of battle.

    3.Nf3 adds another defender to d4, and presently adds a third White piece to the control of e5. But it hinders f2-f3 and does nothing to make possible the developing move Bd3. E3 does part of what 3.Nf3 does by adding a second defender to d4 and simultaneously makes possible Bd3.

    There is more pertaining to the breaks at c4 for White and c5 for Black. And the unlikely breaks at e4 & e5 as well as some factors that I will cover with my next post.

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #43

    APawnCanDream

    Here is another game, it isn't a loss, its a draw, but I thought my opponent made an interesting exchange sacrifice and it resulted in an interesting end game. Feedback of the game in general would be great, but I'm most interested in feedback concerning the end game. Was I correct to assess it a draw or could I have pressed on? I gave some brief comments between moves.

    Thanks for the feedback!

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #44

    rizhanin

    I think black can put pawn on h2 and drive his king to h3 or g3 threatenning Rb1 then. White doesn't seem in time to push his b&c pawns, but if he tries to prevent black's plan by putting Knight on f5, then black picks up white's queenside pawns

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #45

    manic13

    blueemu wrote:

    Space - Time - Force Analysis (with credit to GM Larry Evans).

    For the sake of clarity, we will examine these three elements in reverse order... first Force, then Time, then Space.

    1) Force is easy to grasp... it is just the material situation on the chess-board. The Queen is worth 9 points, Rooks are worth 5 points, Bishop and Knight each worth about 3 points (but with the exact value depending on the nature of the position: Bishops are worth fractionally more in open positions, and Knights are better in closed positions), and Pawns are worth about 1 point. The real value of a Pawn depends on its position on the board, both horizontally and vertically. Pawns that are approaching the Queening square are obviously more valuable; in fact, two Pawns side-by-side on the sixth rank will typically beat a Rook, unless one of them is en-prise. Center Pawns are worth more than flank Pawns... you could roughly value them as: Rook's-Pawn = 0.8 points, Knight's-Pawn = 0.9 points, Bishop's-Pawn = 1.1 points and center-Pawn = 1.2 points.

    2) Time is almost equally easy to grasp... it is just the minimum number of moves that would be needed to reach the game position, ignoring moves made by pieces that have since disappeared from the board. If it is your turn to move, add 1/2 point to your time total. For example, after 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 White's time total is 3 (the e-Pawn has moved once, the Knight twice) and Black's time total is 1.5 (his d-Pawn has moved once, and it is his move to play). Moves by White's captured d-Pawn and Black's captured c-Pawn are ignored... those moves disappeared from the board at the same time that the Pawns did.

    How did Black end up down a move? Because his c-Pawn moved twice before being captured, while White's d-Pawn moved only once before being removed from the board... so the Pawn exchange wasn't quite even: Black traded a Bishop's Pawn (1.1 force-points) and two moves for a Queen's Pawn (1.2 force-points) and one move. This gave White a slight advantage in time in return for a slight disadvantage in force (one center-Pawn vs Black's two).

    3) Space is a bit trickier to grasp... it represents your ability to control the board, and to prevent your opponent's pieces from taking up dominating posts. There are several ways to count space; personally, I use a two-phase system:

    The basic count is made by simply counting the number of squares, from the fourth rank forward, which your pieces currently attack; and then making the same count for your opponent. Count only those squares that are empty or occupied by your opponent's Pawns and pieces... not those occupied by your own men.

    The advanced count is the same, from the fourth rank forward, but instead of counting each attacked square once, you count it as many times as the number of captures you could make on that square... for example, with a Pawn at e4, a Knight at c3 and a Bishop at g2, you could capture three times on d5; so that square is worth 3 points toward your advanced space-count.

    If you subtract the results of your basic space-count from the results of your advanced space-count, you will get a number that represents the degree of coordination between your pieces... the number of times that your pieces are pressuring the same set of squares. A high coordination indicates that your pieces are creating focussed pressure on a particular set of squares, while a low number indicates dispersed pressure.

    Now that you've got the results of your Space - Time - Force analysis... what do you do with them? You consult the Results Matrix, and use it in your attempt to assess the position.

    Advantage in Force: You have the option to simplify towards a favorable endgame. Avoid exchanging an active piece of yours for a passive enemmy piece, unless it seems clear that the resulting position is still won. If you are ahead one or more Pawns, try to exchange pieces, not Pawns... and try to keep Pawns on both wings. Many Pawn-ahead endgames are drawn if all of the remaining Pawns are on the same side of the board.

    Disadvantage in Force: Try to avoid exchanges unless they bring you an immediate advantage, such as eliminating a very active enemy piece, or gaining several moves. Try to gain a counter-advantage in Time; since of all the elements, Time is the easiest to convert into a win. Try to complicate the game... if your opponent is ahead in force, he will be trying to simplify towards an ending.

    Advantage in Time: Open the position and play for a direct attack. Look for combinations. Superior development... which goes hand-in-hand with an advantage in Time... is increasingly important the more open the position is. Avoid exchanges unless they will increase your advantage or eliminate key defenders.

    Disadvantage in Time: Try to keep the position at least semi-closed. Avoid creating organic weaknesses, which offer your opponent targets for attack. Above all, calculate carefully... your opponent's advantage in Time is the signal for him to attack you. Don't let him see one move further than you. Gradually catch up in development and try to exchange off the most threatening enemy pieces, thus neutralizing your opponent's lead in Time.

    Advantage in Space: Avoid exchanges. Keep your opponent confined, and prevent liberating Pawn levers which would lead to the exchange of pieces. Try to convert your Space advantage into an advantage in Time, which would allow you to shift to a direct attack. Use alternating threats on different sectors of the board, switching the pressure from King's side, to Queen's side, to the center, back to the King's side. With less space to manoever, your opponent might easily fall behind in Time as his pieces start interfering with each other... and that will be your signal to open the position and attack him.

    Disadvantage in Space: Avoid creating weaknesses. Try to exchange off some pieces... three pieces rattling around in a cramped position are much easier to bear than seven pieces squeezed into the same cramped position. Try to defend with economical moves, and avoid losing time. Push Pawns only if it will create favorable conditions for exchanges or for counter-play... in a cramped position, pushing Pawns randomly is little better than suicide.

    Would you like me to post a sample game or two, to illustrate these points?

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #46

    manic13

    blueemu wrote:

    Space - Time - Force Analysis (with credit to GM Larry Evans).



    Disadvantage in Force: Try to avoid exchanges unless they bring you an immediate advantage, such as eliminating a very active enemy piece, or gaining several moves. Try to gain a counter-advantage in Time; since of all the elements, Time is the easiest to convert into a win. Try to complicate the game... if your opponent is ahead in force, he will be trying to simplify towards an ending.

    Advantage in Time: Open the position and play for a direct attack. Look for combinations. Superior development... which goes hand-in-hand with an advantage in Time... is increasingly important the more open the position is. Avoid exchanges unless they will increase your advantage or eliminate key defenders.

    Disadvantage in Time: Try to keep the position at least semi-closed. Avoid creating organic weaknesses, which offer your opponent targets for attack. Above all, calculate carefully... your opponent's advantage in Time is the signal for him to attack you. Don't let him see one move further than you. Gradually catch up in development and try to exchange off the most threatening enemy pieces, thus neutralizing your opponent's lead in Time.

    Advantage in Space: Avoid exchanges. Keep your opponent confined, and prevent liberating Pawn levers which would lead to the exchange of pieces. Try to convert your Space advantage into an advantage in Time, which would allow you to shift to a direct attack. Use alternating threats on different sectors of the board, switching the pressure from King's side, to Queen's side, to the center, back to the King's side. With less space to manoever, your opponent might easily fall behind in Time as his pieces start interfering with each other... and that will be your signal to open the position and attack him.

    Disadvantage in Space: Avoid creating weaknesses. Try to exchange off some pieces... three pieces rattling around in a cramped position are much easier to bear than seven pieces squeezed into the same cramped position. Try to defend with economical moves, and avoid losing time. Push Pawns only if it will create favorable conditions for exchanges or for counter-play... in a cramped position, pushing Pawns randomly is little better than suicide.

    Is there a technique for keep tracking time?? And what happens on multiple situations like being ahead in time but back in space or force? Nice post..

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #47

    mauriciolopezsr

    manic13 wrote:
    blueemu wrote:

    Space - Time - Force Analysis (with credit to GM Larry Evans).
    Yes there is a technique, is called a watch!


    Disadvantage in Force: Try to avoid exchanges unless they bring you an immediate advantage, such as eliminating a very active enemy piece, or gaining several moves. Try to gain a counter-advantage in Time; since of all the elements, Time is the easiest to convert into a win. Try to complicate the game... if your opponent is ahead in force, he will be trying to simplify towards an ending.

    Advantage in Time: Open the position and play for a direct attack. Look for combinations. Superior development... which goes hand-in-hand with an advantage in Time... is increasingly important the more open the position is. Avoid exchanges unless they will increase your advantage or eliminate key defenders.

    Disadvantage in Time: Try to keep the position at least semi-closed. Avoid creating organic weaknesses, which offer your opponent targets for attack. Above all, calculate carefully... your opponent's advantage in Time is the signal for him to attack you. Don't let him see one move further than you. Gradually catch up in development and try to exchange off the most threatening enemy pieces, thus neutralizing your opponent's lead in Time.

    Advantage in Space: Avoid exchanges. Keep your opponent confined, and prevent liberating Pawn levers which would lead to the exchange of pieces. Try to convert your Space advantage into an advantage in Time, which would allow you to shift to a direct attack. Use alternating threats on different sectors of the board, switching the pressure from King's side, to Queen's side, to the center, back to the King's side. With less space to manoever, your opponent might easily fall behind in Time as his pieces start interfering with each other... and that will be your signal to open the position and attack him.

    Disadvantage in Space: Avoid creating weaknesses. Try to exchange off some pieces... three pieces rattling around in a cramped position are much easier to bear than seven pieces squeezed into the same cramped position. Try to defend with economical moves, and avoid losing time. Push Pawns only if it will create favorable conditions for exchanges or for counter-play... in a cramped position, pushing Pawns randomly is little better than suicide.

    Is there a technique for keep tracking time?? And what happens on multiple situations like being ahead in time but back in space or force? Nice post..

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #48

    redchessman

    Don't waste your time counting space and time and garbage like that.  It's just useless.  No strong player does this; this is not math.  Instead, Look at positions as a whole and try to make improvements.  Try to figure out where your pieces are best placed and get them there.  


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