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Please analyse my failure


  • 3 years ago · Quote · #1

    MetalFactor

    Its very humiliating defeat for me, kind of puts my morale down. Anyway, could u please tell which areas was i lacking in and how can i improve? Is there any area where i might have improved. What were the errors?

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #2

    zirtoc

    2. d4  Check out the Scandinavian opening here.  1. e4 d5 2. exd5 is usually played.  Then black has to bring his queen out early, and you can harrass it with your minor pieces while you develop.

    I can see that you were trying to follow the rules here - you are developing pieces, getting center pawns out there, etc.  But you aren't doing it in a very safe way.  Both you and your opponent got carried away with the queens too early - for example, if you played 7. g3 then black has to move his queen somewhere, say ..Qe7.  Now you play 8. Bg2 and white can now castle, and you can save this game.

    But I think it is time for you to learn the first few moves in the Scandinavian opening.  You will have a much better game!  It is also called the Center-Counter.  Best of luck!

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #3

    MetalFactor

    paulgottlieb wrote:

    First of all, try not to feel strong emotions, like humiliation, they interfere with your analytical abilities! But seriously, we all have disasters from time to time. My disasters may be a bit more sophisticated than yours, but they hurt just as much. Chess is not for the weak!

    Now to the game! Do you have any chess books? Are you interested in doing a little studying? If so, let me know and I'll suggest a book or two and some onloine resources. After 1.e4 d5, the usual and best move is 2.exd5. If Black plays 2...Qxd5 You play 3.Nc3 and you get your knight out with a gain of time. The way you played it, you were on the defensive with the white pieces from move 1. This is always a sign that you did something wrong.

    After 6...Qh4 you should have considered the solid 7.Bg3. His queen has to retreat and you're doing fine. If there is one lesson you want to take from the game, it is the vulnerability of the c2 and c7 squares early in the game. A knight check on that square can be quite devastating. When you played. You absolutely needed to play 9.Rc1 to prevent Nxc2+, and you would have had an OK game.  In fact, if you had played 7.Bg3, after 7...Qd8 8.Nb5 you have some threats of Nxc7+ yourself.

    Some online chess books would be helpful. :)

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #4

    stephen_33

    No need to feel bad about this one MetalFactor, happens to all of us & your opponent has a somewhat higher rating ? - no disgrace in losing to a better player.

    Your opponent isn't exactly covered in glory anyway because they should have mated you on move 10 & not fussed around moving the queen out of danger ! That suggests to me that they didn't see the mate themselves & it was more due to serendipity than design.

     

     No amount of chess 'revision' will help you spot attacks that you are presently overlooking: That comes down to simple concentration. For example, black's move 7...Nb4 attacks your queen but did you not see the imminent fork at c2 ?  If you had moved your queen to b3,d2 or d1 it would have solved both immediate threats but your position isn't strong.

    I used to have the problem of concentrating so hard on a small area of the board that I'd miss threats elsewhere so I trained myself to 'zoom out' every so often, take in the entire scene & reassess any vulnerability in my position, threats developing etc. Be particularly wary of bishops on corner squares, commanding those long diagonals !

    I think this advice will serve you equally well if you tackle chess puzzles such as the daily one on this site - it's all good practice for real games.

     

    In my view you really need to be able to play good 'technical' chess free of careless sacrifices & not missing obvious threats before you can think about deep strategy but that will come with practice.

     

    More generally, don't delay castling for too long & be nervous when you have open files anywhere near your king, such as the d-file. Again, I have a feeling that at move 8 when black played Rd8 you thought it was no more than a defensive move to protect the rook ? - it's what you might call a 'feint', something that pretends to be one thing but is really something else. Had you sat back then & taken in the whole board, you might have seen the threat & played:  10.Qa4 & protected c2.

     

    Try to think of any defeat as a chess lesson & not let it get you down & remember to have fun, whatever the outcome.


     

     Edit:  Yep - typo error, meant 10.Qa4. Having problems with a new laptop/browser but I thought I'd re-read my post thoroughly-oops!
  • 3 years ago · Quote · #5

    Saint-Paulia

    "Again, I have a feeling that at move 8 when black played Rd8 you thought it was no more than a defensive move to protect the rook ? - it's what you might call a 'feint', something that pretends to be one thing but is really something else. Had you sat back then & taken in the whole board, you might have seen the threat & played:  10.a4 & protected c2."

    Sorry, but I can't figure out the advice here. First of all what are the moves for 9? And then this admonition to play 10. a4, what does that do? the Knight is still threatening mate no?

    BTW Metal thanks for sharing with us. I felt exactly the same way the other day when I lost EVERY game (5 I believe) I played.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #6

    Scottrf

    I'm not a strong player but a few comments after a quick review. Someone might find faults with a couple of the ideas. Just seen a couple of the newer comments, haven't checked for repetition.

    2. edx4 is better, as was said, you can play Nc3 etc, develop your pieces with tempo.

    6. I would have probably have pushed my pawn with a counter threat, which with an exhange doubles two of his pawns. Sometimes you don't have to respond directly to a threat.

    8. You should be able to intuitively spot this fork on c2 even without a mating threat. Castling queenside prevents this and puts your rook on the open d file.

    9. Not sure why you checked? Just for the sake of it? This is where you have to look at the threats of your opponent, which to be fair is hard to spot if you hadn't seen the fork. It always helps to look at what checks your opponent has. c6 is a huge blunder by black here (EDIT: Forget this, saw the check and forgot about it when looking back), Qa4 saves you.

    10. Qa4 saves your game. Black didn't need to move his queen here, had mate.

    11. You still had Qa4.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #7

    Saint-Paulia

    Scott wrote: "10. Qa4 saves your game. Black didn't need to move his queen here, had mate". So a typo then. Stephen meant Qa4.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #8

    Scottrf

    Saintpauliana wrote:

    Scott wrote: "10. Qa4 saves your game. Black didn't need to move his queen here, had mate". So a typo then. Stephen meant Qa4.

    Yeah.

    While telling you to spot mate I played the following game (final move). Didn't want to lose two rooks for his queen by Rc1 and completely forgot about the mate I had spotted earlier.

    http://www.chess.com/echess/game.html?id=52753355

    Let myself get mated when I think I had a decent chance of the win Yell

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #9

    beardogjones

    Young man, why didn't you play 10qa4 and you are fine?

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #10

    Skwerly

    i'd stay away from gambits.  just play solid, castle, and leave the tricky stuff alone.  :)

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #11

    CHCL

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 3 years ago · Quote · #12

    CHCL

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 3 years ago · Quote · #13

    MetalFactor

    Actually i dont seem to have aggressive style as most attacking players do. Thanks for helpful advice though. I realise my mistakes, andd will try to see 'the whole board' @stephen 33.

    @skewrly: Gambits? I use counter gambits rather.

     

    Thanks guys very appreciated. I want to be a grandmaster one day (very afar dream though). Already joined chess club, and am hoping for summer league in UK. These tips really help me. Hope to get to the top.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #14

    stephen_33

    MetalFactor wrote:

     

     I want to be a grandmaster one day (very afar dream though). Already joined chess club, and am hoping for summer league in UK. These tips really help me. Hope to get to the top.

    I admire your ambition - you've definitely got age on your side.
    Best of luck. 


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