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Seems like I should have won this


  • 3 years ago · Quote · #1

    XxNoWorriesxX

    He started with d4 which unfortunately is by far my least knowledgable area, but it was a close game all the way through. Shortly before we went into the end game I was ahead by a pawn. I think I made 1 wrong move which brought me from what should of been a win to what should of been a draw. Then I think I screwed up a little later and turned it into a loss. Fortunately my opponent messed up at the end and it ended in a stalemate, lucky me.

    Did I make earlier mistakes or was it just the one wrong move that screwed the whole game up for me? Overall it was a tough game for me and I used up just about all my time when it ended in a stalemate as it seemed the whole length of the game that one wrong move would push it his way.

     

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #2

    AnthonyCG

    A rule of thumb in d-pawn openings is that when Black plays f3 you should counter with ...c5. If you can't do that then f3 won't be a problem for White. In this game it actually helped since he wasn't punished for it. You have to play c5 and hit his center. Otherwise White can do whatever he wants and get away with it.

    Instead of 6...a6, 6...c5 is the move. Attack his center and then your knight can come out.

    29...c3 looks pretty good.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #3

    Bubatz

    The opening on both sides was quite unorthodox, but you played ok. While you should in principle trade when ahead, a pawn is often too narrow a margin. Also you should not trade no matter what the cost! 31.bxa3 was an obvious mistake, which isolated and subsequently forfeited your c-pawn. From the game you posted here it is clear to see that you should definitely work a bit on your endgame skills next - this would make you a much better player in no time.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #4

    XxNoWorriesxX

    AnthonyCG wrote:

    A rule of thumb in d-pawn openings is that when Black plays f3 you should counter with ...c5. If you can't do that then f3 won't be a problem for White. In this game it actually helped since he wasn't punished for it. You have to play c5 and hit his center. Otherwise White can do whatever he wants and get away with it.

    Instead of 6...a6, 6...c5 is the move. Attack his center and then your knight can come out.

    29...c3 looks pretty good.


     I see that now. I also just got the computer analysis back which also said 6...c5 is the right way to go.

    It also confirmed 29...c3 was the right move too. Unfortunate that it was my first instinct there and for some reason as I went through what would happen it didn't see like I should do it. Shows some flaws in my calculating abilities.

     

    Computer also showed some other significant mistakes by both black and white that I missed both during the game and when looking at it after.  Still got some serious work to do.

     

    It is helpful to know that with d4 openings I should keep an eye out for a good time to do c5 also specifically look for it when the white does f3. That is a good general idea I never knew.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #5

    XxNoWorriesxX

    Bubatz wrote:

    From the game you posted here it is clear to see that you should definitely work a bit on your endgame skills next - this would make you a much better player in no time.


     I certainly agree. The main problem has been that because of the level I'm playing at a significant number of games don't make it to the end game which means I haven't had much experience with it yet.

    I'll probably have to start doing some of the end game computer workouts on here.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #6

    BLaCK_SyNeRgY

    Both sides were making mistakes, but you were no doubt better until the endgame. You did blunder a pawn multiple times, only one time your opponent spotted it. I honestly I think isolating the pawns was only a very minor mistake, probably playing a5 was more accurate, but its by no means game losing because theres symmetry and he has no majority on the queenside, and you have the majority on the kingside.

    The biggest mistake you made was pushing your pawns in the endgame before getting your king in the action. The king is a powerful piece in endgames, and the reason he won was because his king was more active than yours.


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