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Some odd openings I had in mind


  • 4 months ago · Quote · #1

    albatrosinus

    Do these openings exist? If yes, are they often played?

    Since I don't know that, I gave them names :

    THE FRANKENSTEIN'S GAMBIT

    THE COUNTER-SPANISH OPENING

    THE ULTIMATE QUEEN'S PAWN ADVANCE

    THE FRENCH RUY LOPEZ




    I'll be adding some.


  • 4 months ago · Quote · #2

    albatrosinus

    Knight's Gambit

    There were other variations but they disappeared... (don't know why)
     



  • 4 months ago · Quote · #3

    albatrosinus

    Maybe this KGD.



  • 4 months ago · Quote · #4

    EvgeniyZh

    Have you tried them in real games?

  • 4 months ago · Quote · #5

    albatrosinus

    After the Scotch and the Ruy Lopez...



  • 4 months ago · Quote · #6

    Pmil1756

    I`m no expert, but i like the openingsTongue Out

  • 4 months ago · Quote · #7

    TC2304

    The 'knight gambit' one is actually called the 'Halloween Gambit'Laughing

  • 4 months ago · Quote · #8

    Twinchicky

    The "Frankenstein Gambit" could be significantly improved by not playing 5...0-0, but rather accelerating it with 5...Bg4 and keeping the rook on a8. A passed edge pawn in the middlegame is usually well worth a piece, and I think this is one of those situations. Black will castle queenside and have rooks on a8 and b8... The kingside pawn offensive will be unstoppable.

  • 4 months ago · Quote · #9

    Irontiger

    Twinchicky wrote:

    The "Frankenstein Gambit" could be significantly improved by not playing 5...0-0, but rather accelerating it with 5...Bg4 and keeping the rook on a8. A passed edge pawn in the middlegame is usually well worth a piece, and I think this is one of those situations. Black will castle queenside and have rooks on a8 and b8... The kingside pawn offensive will be unstoppable.

    It would be even more improved by not sacrificing a piece for nothing (in the OP, 11.Be2 and it's 1-0).

    As for the kingside offensive being unstoppable, in the event of Black castling queenside in a KID, hmm... which kingside are you talking of ?

  • 4 months ago · Quote · #10

    albatrosinus

    In this N's gambit / Halloween Gambit; I guess after 5... Ng6 black has a well better position. Doesn't work.

    I think the one I take the most seriously is the 3. c3 move I think really interesting.

    The French Ruy Lopez... don't know... really don't know

     

    The Ultimate QP Advance transposes (after 2... c5 3. c4) to a Benoni easily.

     

    King's Gambit Ruy Lopez... the same

    Counter-Spanish seems a little interesting.

    Frankenstein's Gambit is just... IDK, maybe for bullet chess?

  • 4 months ago · Quote · #11

    harryz

    Frankenstein Gambit: Terrible. Why sacrifice your bishop for nothing? It's not like you have a winning attack.

    Counter-Spanish: Probably not invented, but most of the moves dont make sense

    Ultimate queens gambit advance: Moves dont make much sense either

    French Ruy Lopez: The correct move after 5. Bb5 is Bd7, threatening Nxe5 and forcing white to either give up the bishop pair or retreat his bishop

    Knights gambit: Already invented. Called the Halloween gambit

    KGD: I dont know the line but it probably already has a name to it

    Scotch/Ruy Lopez: Thats the Ponzaini

  • 4 months ago · Quote · #12

    Twinchicky

    Irontiger wrote:
    Twinchicky wrote:

    The "Frankenstein Gambit" could be significantly improved by not playing 5...0-0, but rather accelerating it with 5...Bg4 and keeping the rook on a8. A passed edge pawn in the middlegame is usually well worth a piece, and I think this is one of those situations. Black will castle queenside and have rooks on a8 and b8... The kingside pawn offensive will be unstoppable.

    It would be even more improved by not sacrificing a piece for nothing (in the OP, 11.Be2 and it's 1-0).

    As for the kingside offensive being unstoppable, in the event of Black castling queenside in a KID, hmm... which kingside are you talking of ?

    Thanks for pointing that out. I took about a 30-second-long look at that position and didn't really pay any attention to what I was about to post.

  • 4 months ago · Quote · #13

    cornbeefhashvili

    There is this for black:



  • 4 months ago · Quote · #14

    albatrosinus

    Once, I played something with f5-h5-g5-g4 early but I don't remember what it was.

  • 4 months ago · Quote · #15

    albatrosinus

    e5 against d4, you mean...

  • 4 months ago · Quote · #16

    najdorf96

    Indeed. There is an reason these 'odd' openings are rarely played, especially in this day & age of databases, opening explorer...etc. In fact, some of these moves can be found in such opening trap books written in 1958-90's. (ie Byrne, Mednis, Chernev, Horowitz, Pandofini...). Maybe you could dig up games from the early 1900's.

    As it is, you could always play these OTB.

  • 4 months ago · Quote · #17

    MetalRatel

    1) (Frankenstein - funnily enough, this name is used for another opening FYI) This just loses a piece for insufficent compensation. (Blunder: 8...Bh5??) You will see piece sacrifices in the King's Indian, but usually in closed positions where the black pieces already have a clear route to the king. It just doesn't make sense here at all.

    2) (Counter Spanish) 3.d4! looks strong. White can sacrifice a pawn for huge compensation after something like 3...Qe7 4.dxe5 Qxe5 5.Nf3. 3...Qh4 is similar. 3...exd4 4.Qxd4 seems to at least lose the bishop pair for no compensation. It looks really risky.

    3) (Queen's Pawn Advance) is a positional error. 2.d5 c6 3.c4 cxd5 4.cxd5 e6 5.Nc3 Bb4 6.dxe6 fxe6. Black has the better center and a lead in development. I prefer exchanging with c-pawn slightly, as it frees the c6-square for the knight.

    4) (French Ruy Lopez) is another strategic error. After 9.f4 Nxd4!, White comes under heavy pressure. The bishop on b5 is often tactically vulnerable after ...Bd7 (...Nxe5 is a common tactical theme French players are familiar with). If White exchanges pieces on c6 after Black has defended the pin, he loses his good bishop and is often worse.

    5) (Knight's Gambit) is called the Halloween Gambit and is probably the best of these. Nice idea if you found out this yourself. However, 6.d5 Bb4! =/+ is known to be a safe antidote for Black. Black returns the piece and has the better game.

    6) (KGD) I don't think this would compare well with 2.f4 Bc5 as the bishop is shut out.

    7) This is the Ponziani, a very old opening. 3.c3 d5! is probably the strongest move.

    I've seen a few of these in games of lower rated players. If you understand the main lines, you will see the defects in many of these ideas. If you want to do opening research, you should consult a database and have an engine on hand. However, you should probably find a general reference book as a guide. Fundamental Chess Openings by van der Sterren is one book that comes to mind.

  • 4 months ago · Quote · #18

    albatrosinus

    HOW DID I GET 300 VIEWS WITH THAT?!


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