Upgrade to Chess.com Premium!

The Opera Game


  • 6 years ago · Quote · #1

    bjazz

    This game was played in 1858 at the interlude of Night at the Opera, as the great Paul Morphy was invited to Paris' Opera by two quite strong chess afficionados; Duke Karl of Brunswick and Count Isouard who consulted together but couldn't hold their ground more than 16 moves. The game is one of chess history's most famous ones, but rarely found in any "best of chess" books because of the noble pair's less than Grandmaster standard of play. From a Philidor's defence situation, Morphy sac's all his pieces mating with the last remaining two. Enjoy

    Comments are appreciated

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #2

    Scarblac

    Morphy, not Murphy.

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #3

    bjazz

    I stand corrected :)

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #4

    Vonzi

    you did not say that morphy didnt play Qxb7 because of Qb4+

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #5

    bjazz

    Yeah, sorry. It's the first time I've tried inserting a chess game and the first try went bonkers somehow, so I re-did it by copy-pasting  the comments. I think I missed Qb4+ in the first place as well though. Well observed

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #6

    Streptomicin

    Omg, I wanted to post this same game but I just did not have time.

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #7

    DimKnight

    bjazz wrote:

    The game is one of chess history's most famous one's, but rarely found in any "best of chess" books because of the noble pair's less than Grandmaster standard of play.


    Are you kidding? I can think of three books I have within an arm's reach that have extensive annotations of this game. It's usually presented as a "here's what not to do," but it's well represented in print.

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #8

    bjazz

    DimKnight wrote:
    bjazz wrote:

    The game is one of chess history's most famous one's, but rarely found in any "best of chess" books because of the noble pair's less than Grandmaster standard of play.


    Are you kidding? I can think of three books I have within an arm's reach that have extensive annotations of this game. It's usually presented as a "here's what not to do," but it's well represented in print.


     Yep, sorry. What I meant to communicate was that the game is not considered among the greatest games in the history of chess because of the lack of high standard play from both sides, and as such not found in books such as "the Mammoth Book of the World's Greatest Chess Games" by Nunn, Emms and Burgess, or other similar ones that concentrate mainly on the afore-mentioned standard. As I mentioned, it is one of the world's most famous games though.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #9

    Pau

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #10

    luisa264

    beautiful,what an artist(Morphy)

  • 6 months ago · Quote · #11

    172020

    Genius, sacrificing valuable pieces to divert their important pieces from the action to do a materfully executed checkmate? Well done indeed.

  • 4 weeks ago · Quote · #12

    jxiao

    You could put exclamation marks and question marks (for those who don't know: !!=brilliant, !=very strong, !?=interesting, ?!=dubious, ?=mistake, ??=blunder), for example, 9...b5?


Back to Top

Post your reply: