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We need more amateurs to post their annotated games.


  • 3 years ago · Quote · #181

    Lucifer99

    Well played, and annoted well!

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #182

    theunderground702

    Glex, your annotations in the opening into the middle game really interested me and I feel like you may have overlooked many things. You seem to be a very thorough player so you should consider some of these points.

    5. Ne4 - can you explain why you picked this move? it seems to me like you are giving away turns for insufficient compensation. Black's c-pawn is his gambit pawn, and moreover it is easily defended by ... e6, where it is defended by the bishop. 
    5. ...e6  is actually a very good move. Now your opponent has brought the bishop in (protecting c-pawn), and opened another line for his queen, while your queen is still trapped, only one of your bishops has prospects. On his side: both his bishops are out, one is already defending a piece, his queen has prospects.
    6. d4 - This is a logical move, but I still think you are miscalculating the situation. There cannot be a pin on the knight without a piece that is threatening to capture it. Even if things go according to your plan (...cxd4 7.Qxd4) - your opponent can bring out his other knight with tempo to c6, since it is chasing your queen away. Once his knight is there, it can recapture the queen if you ever take the queen, but this is not even necessary because: after your queen moves, he would have many good choices. He could bring out his bishop to d7, protecting the knight from ever being pin-attacked by your c-pawn. He could simply move his queen to c7, which is a good square.

    Anyway, after 6. ..f5  this is all irrelevant since that is a terrible move. But you should consider these things about this variation of the Sicilian. If you just spend a few minutes on the position you will see that e6 is a very good response, and that against a better player you would have lost your initiative at this point, and completely given your opponent the initiave if you followed through with your Qxd4 plan.

    8. ...Nc6? This would have been a useful move a few turns ago lol, like you say. At this point he could have still saved himself with Qa5+, getting the pawn back and eliminating the chance of your c-pawn attack.

    9.c4  In this scenario, your plan of course was successful, but please I want you to understand it was only possible because your opponent made some terrible mistakes. Normally this would never succeed. Sorry!

    9. ...Nf6?! Even at this point, it seems to me that he could have saved himself from the embarassing knight re-capture on d8. If he had played ...Nb4, then if you do the queen trade, the next turn you would have to move your king in order to avoid his knight fork at c2!! So you wouldn't have exchanged queens probably, and if you attacked his knight, he could have exchanged your queen!

    11. Ne5 is a very good move indeed, for all the reasons you mentioned. A beautiful spot.

    13.Nxf7 is a MUCH better idea than f4?!, because if f4, then he could have taken your knight and your poor f-pawn would end up on e5! and you'd be left with an open kingside.


    19.g4!? I still have to say that this kind of risk for your king is unnecessary, especially since this game is already in your favor. I know that there is no longer a queen and bishop, but now you have unnecessarily created a backward pawn at f3. While it is good to attack the kingside with pawn, it is not so good if it leaves your own kingside undefended. I also think you could have considered castling Queenside! Then you could have thrown all your pawns at him. Before b3, the queenside was a good spot for your king.



    Nice job with the bishop attack calculations and the checkmate at the end. Lol not capturing his rook with your bishop - stuff like that happens to me all the time and I kind of just sit there and say "uhhhhhh....... "   =P

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #183

    GIex

    Thanks for your reply! Here are my move choice reasons and comments on my opponent's moves:

    5.Ne4 threatens Black's c5 pawn, that Black has probably wanted to exchange for White's d pawn which is safe for now. Chances are that 5.Ne4 may mess up Black's plans, and also gives White the initiative since Black has to reply to threats instead of develop strategically or go for an attack.

    5...e6 leaves Black's light squared bishop trapped, because while White has the initiative and plays forcing moves and until Black doesn't move the pawn from e6 (White didn't allow that until 15.Be2, when he already had an advantage), Black can't play the bishop along c8-h3, while playing it at the queenside is pointless because of White's light sqare copntrol there (the a2-c4 pawn chain consequence). Black brought it into play at 18...Bc6, when he already had a bad position. That bishop took no part at the opening, where it could have pinned a knight or done something else to help. Also, Black could have developed his dark squared bishop to g7 to control d4 and e5 (the latter square was very important for White in the game), as well as the a1-h8 diagonal that White played his bishop along in the middlegame, so opening the a3-f8 diagonal was not necessary.

    About the queen: I prefer to use the queen as a defensive piece, and for supporting attacks from the back ranks (for pairing in a queen-rook battery or with a bishop ahead, so that I can exchange the other piece if my opponent challenges the control of the file/diagonal), so I had no intention bo bring it into play before my other pieces unless necessary (as when I exchanged it to hinder Black's knight's development). Also, after 4...Nxd5 the d file was semi open, and having a rook / queen on it was useful.

    6.d4: Yes, I wrote he should play ...Nc6. But I would play Bb6 then, pinning his knight, and then c4 would have been even more effective.

    About 6...f5: It doesn't matter how good the opponent is. At a certain position, it's up to a move choice, and if the opponent doesn't choose well, his overall skill is not important. You have to consider the board position, not your opponent.  "Who is your opponent tonight, tonight I am playing against the black pieces", as Rubinstein said.

    Anyway Laughing But how could Black take the initiative after 6...f5?

    8...Nc6: Yes, I wrote Black should have played that before he lost a pawn. But 9...Qa5? loses a knight for two pawns to 10.Bd2 Qxc5 11.cxd5 Qxd5.

    9.c4: Yes, mistakes are part of chess. If there were no mistakes, all games would be drawn (since a mistake is move that worsens the position by definition, and if the position doesn't go worse for either player, the game is a draw). That's why exploiting enemy's mistakes is how chess players win. There's no other way. This is actually what's "normal" at chess, and that's what every win is based upon. As Bobby Fischer said, "That's what chess is all about. One day you give your opponent a lesson, the next day he gives you one".

    9...Nf6: If 9...Nb4, then 10.Qxd8+ Nxd8+ 11.Nd4. If 11...e5, then 12.Bd2. There's nothing for White to worry about.

    13.Nxf7: Black could not attack e5 with a piece in case of 13.f4 Nxe5 14.fxe5. Trying to reposition his knight by ...h6, ...Ng5 will result in doubled g pawns for Black after Bxg5, and White will have control over f6 too. That's why 13.f4 should also be considered as a candidate move (although I didn't play it). There are two reasons for not choosing the best move: the first is not looking at all candidate moves, the second is miscalculating the one you play, and both of them are equally important.

    19.g4: My aim was to open the kingside (since ...f4? loses a pawn immediately). Then I would have been able to use my pieces more effectively, because ...fxg4, fxg4 would open lines for them. This is what happened after 23...fxg4 24.fxg4 and the resulting piece exchanges and tactical combinations.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #184

    jetfighter13

    two things, would some one analyse the fried liver game i posted, and how bout this one

    and if you want to see the fried liver game its posted below
  • 3 years ago · Quote · #185

    Flangribaz

    jetfighter13 wrote:

    two things, would some one analyse the fried liver game i posted, and how bout this one

    and if you want to see the fried liver game its posted below

    8. c3 looks, at first glance, antipositional.  You need to develop your pieces, attack.  The c3 square is needed for your knight.  Nc3 is much more natural.  After ...Bd7 his knight on d5 was hanging for several moves, also. 

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #186

    jetfighter13

    how bout th edouble exclam move ,does it deserve those

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #187

    Flangribaz

    jetfighter13 wrote:

    how bout th edouble exclam move ,does it deserve those


    I dunno.  What's your rating?  At the level of 800-1000 maybe.  Above that it's a simple one move tactic. 

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #188

    Mm40

    For annotated games, consider reading my blog post. I think it's pretty good.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #189

    jetfighter13

    Flangribaz wrote:
    jetfighter13 wrote:

    how bout th edouble exclam move ,does it deserve those


    I dunno.  What's your rating?  At the level of 800-1000 maybe.  Above that it's a simple one move tactic. 


     read the annotations on it

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #190

    KageLord

    Yeah... it definitely just swallowed my entire post, including two annotated games, into nothingness when I hit submit...

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #191

    KageLord

    One of my games from the Chicago Class Championship (class D). I will hopefully post another good one tomorrow:

     

     

    Thanks in advance for any help!

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #192

    GIex

    Here's a game I played today. It was a King Pawn Game: Wayward Queen Attack.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #193

    KageLord

    Well done, Glex. I actually played the man that 1. e4 e5 2. Qh5 was named after (as it is more commonly known as the Parham Attack now). Unfortunately I played him as White and thus did not get the position I enjoy against this opening (and ended up getting slaughtered since he's a master and I'm class D).

    I have to ask, is Qf6 a common response? To me it seems inferior to Nc6 or even Nf6.

    Your annotations seem pretty spot on to me. Nothing I can add.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #194

    pauix

    This is a game I finished today. I was playing the Black side of a quite unorthodox opening that turned into a Traxler-like game:

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #195

    Flangribaz

    jetfighter13 wrote:
    Flangribaz wrote:
    jetfighter13 wrote:

    how bout th edouble exclam move ,does it deserve those


    I dunno.  What's your rating?  At the level of 800-1000 maybe.  Above that it's a simple one move tactic. 


     read the annotations on it


    I've already read them.  So? 

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #196

    eaglejorge

    Hello , I share with you this game fully anotated

    Intro:

    Yesterday I learned about the Bxh7 Greek Sacrifice...I googled a few websites, watched a few games with bxh7,  and I said to myself "I'm going to use it soon."

     

    "Soon" came 24 hours later. Lately my chess is getting better thanks to dpruess lesson of  "Maximum effort".

    So, off I went. I played three unrated 1 minute games to warm up and then bang!, an unawared player asking for a 2 minute rated game..."I have this Greek Gift plan I'm gonna use it, if I can..."

    Greek Sacrifice here it goes...

    Try the Greek Gift Sacrifice Yourself!

    Thanks for reading

    Comments are always greatly appreciated.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #197

    jetfighter13

    Flangribaz wrote:
    jetfighter13 wrote:
    Flangribaz wrote:
    jetfighter13 wrote:

    how bout th edouble exclam move ,does it deserve those


    I dunno.  What's your rating?  At the level of 800-1000 maybe.  Above that it's a simple one move tactic. 


     read the annotations on it


    I've already read them.  So? 


     consider the implications of said move

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #198

    stephnlawrnce

    Hi Aaron,

    Think I'll post a game, how do you get it into the correct format?

    Best,

    Steve

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #199

    Pikachulord6

    This seems like a pretty good idea. Actually, it reminds me of “Chess Study Hall”, a group that was created recently for the sole purpose of having its members help each other analyze their games for instructional purposes. Group activity has slowed down a bit of late though, as our members seem to be a bit busy lately. It’s not so much the commenting that takes up time, but the posting of a self-annotated game. If you have the time to post a self-annotated game and you’d like input on your game and your annotations, feel free to join. There aren’t as many voices in that forum as there are in this one, but there are a number of members (like myself) who feel more comfortable analyzing games in the group forum (rather than in this one).

     

    By the way, I’m aware of some sort of rule related to groups, but I’m not quite sure of the details. In any event, if the paragraph above is deemed inappropriate in any way, shape, or form, please let me know and I’ll delete my post promptly.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #200

    theunderground702

    I think people are misunderstanding the term "amateurs". Most of the people posting their games here are beginners who need basic instruction/lessions and shouldn't be playing LIve Chess because it isn't going to help them.


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