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  • 3 years ago · Quote · #121

    jetfighter13

    I played Black btw

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #122

    Flangribaz

    Here's a game I played last night, game 90, unrated, OTB.

     

    If Kg1 rather than Kh1, any suggestions anyone?  We didn't analyze that at all last night, and I'm done analyzing for now.
  • 3 years ago · Quote · #123

    jetfighter13

    here is another i just won i feel this was a good game, i dont know how to analyse some of these moves

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #124

    zman1234

    jetfighter13 wrote:

    here is another i just won i feel this was a good game, i dont know how to analyse some of these moves


     Good game!!! The one move your opponent made that i really disagreed with was 16.... Qe6? It was bad because his position is horrible and he lost a piece.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #125

    zman1234

    What move did i play in this position?

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #126

    -Raveen-

    zman1234 wrote:

     

    What move did i play in this position?

     


    You probably played Qxe5.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #127

    MaverickM

    Whichever move did u play, your passed pawn was a sure queen, so u must have sacrificed ur queen by one or the other way ;)

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #128

    Kittysafe

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #129

    GIex

    jetfighter13 wrote:

    here is another i just won i feel this was a good game, i dont know how to analyse some of these moves


    After 7.Bxc4, the position a variation of the Scheveningen Formation by White. Except from playing the Sicilian Defense as Black, this formation can be achieved by White in the English Opening after White exchanges his c pawn for Black's d pawn and plays exd4 exd4, as in this case. For example:

    A similar position (but after Black has played ...c6, as happened later in this game) can be achieved from The Orthodox Exchange Formation (after White exchanges his e pawn for Black's d pawn). Some of the common ideas in those positions are applicable here too.

    In this position, White has an isolated d pawn on the 4th rank, an open e file and semi-open c and d files. White's game plan can include taking control of the open e file (after 0-0 and Re1) and putting pressure on c7 (by Bf4, Rac1 and b4-5) to support his d pawn push. He can use e5 and f5 for his minor pieces (Ne5 and Bf5 for example). Black can try to exploit White's d pawn weakness (i.e, doubling rooks on the d file if allowed) or block it with a minor piece (Bd6 since Black can't stop d5), or simplify the position by piece exchanges and reach an endgame where White's isolated d pawn may be difficult to protect. An exchange of White's d pawn and Black's c pawn will result in "symmetrical" pawn structures for both players.

    About tactics:

    White could have played 5.cxd4 Nxd4 6.Bb5 so that Black would either double his pawns on the c file or lose his e pawn (if Black tries to protect his e pawn by 6...f6 or 6...Bd6 then Bxc6 bxc6; if 6...Qd6 then 7.Bxc6 bxc6 or 7...Qxc6 8.Nxe5). In both cases, White would have had center domination and an easy game.

    With 7.Bd6?!, Black makes no attempt to prevent a 8.d5 break which is White's most obvious threat. 8.d5 would drive Black's queen's knight away from c6. If 8...Na5, then 9.Bb5+ c6 10.dxc6 and Black will have isolated a and c pawns after 10...bxc6 or 10...Nxc6 11.Bxc6 bxc6. (8...Nb4 9.a3; 8...Ne7 9.Qe2.)

    I think 8.Bg5?! is an inaccuracy, because Black's f6 knight is not threatening anything. Exchanging White's queen's bishop for that knight gives Black time, allows him to castle and get better development after 8...0-0 9.0-0 h6 10.Bxf6 Qxf6. Now Black has two pieces attacking White's d4 pawn, and 11.d5? can be effectively met by 11...Ne5 and a subsequent knight exchange or an attack on White's castle by ...Bh3.

    15...f6?? creates a hole on g6 that can be occupied by Nh4-g6. Black could do little to meet that, for example 16.Nh4 Rd8 (16...Re8 17.Rxe8#; 16...Bd7 17.Ng6+ Kg8 18.Nxf8) 17.Ng6+ Kg8. Then an option is 18.Qa4 Nc6 19.Bc4+ Kh7 20.Bf7.

    16...Qe6?? 17.Qxe6 Bxe6 18.Rxe6 and Black loses a bishop. The game outcome was clear bearing in mind Black's white square weakness and his weakened castle. His following move, 18.c6?, denied his knight any opportunity to take part in the game, which emphasized White's material and development advantage. 20.b3, 21.Bg6, 22.Re8 Rbxe8 23.Rxe8 Rxe8 24.Bxe8 and White can go for a kingside pawn push, supported by his king and minor pieces, which will win the game (a knight or bishop sacrifice was an option).

    23.Re8+!! was better (faster Laughing), and then 23...Rxe8 24.Rxe8+ Kh7 25.Rh8#.

    As a whole: White had the initiative most of the time, obtained center control without much opposition from Black and due to his opponent's strategical (not initiating counterplay; weakening his castle; losing control over white squares; bad piece development and harmonization) and tactical mistakes (overlooking some combinations) achieved a favorable position, got ahead in material and finally won the game. Cool

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #130

    theunderground702

    I think this is an excellent topic - props to OP! 

    The reason I like Live Chess is that the games are brief enough to give me a quick taste of certain openings. I wish I could played against better opponents, but my really low rating kind of makes that impossible. I know little to nothing about openings, but I do like playing black and finding a way to make a plan from the start and forcing it to happen. This is probably a bad approach at higher levels, but it's giving me a chance to grasp the dynamics of chess.

    ANYWAY, this game I played this morning is very important to me! I played a backwards position as black.. and had a good time watching my opponent move pieces around aimlessly, even though he seemed like a better play at first.

    How LONG does it take to get better by the way? I've been playing chess almost daily for over a month now and it feels like it's taking forever to get any good at it. Then I make stupid mistakes like b6! 

    Any insights would be greatly appreciated, esp. on my Knight back to g8 move!

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #131

    theunderground702

    Kittysafe wrote:

     


     

    18. ..Ng8 is an absolutely monstrous move. 

     

    You have a good learning opportunity here. I recommend setting this position up on a chess program and playing the rest out against the highest  difficulty level (before Ng8 of course). You should be able to checkmate him, but the method may be new to someone at your level. I think that would be worth your time and will teach you something about pulling the enemy king to the middle of the board.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #132

    theunderground702

    I'm noticing that people are just posting games with no self-analysis or comments. The point of this thread is to write why you are making moves and what you think of them, so that better players can go from there and help you out.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #133

    zman1234

    theunderground702 wrote:

    I think this is an excellent topic - props to OP! 

    The reason I like Live Chess is that the games are brief enough to give me a quick taste of certain openings. I wish I could played against better opponents, but my really low rating kind of makes that impossible. I know little to nothing about openings, but I do like playing black and finding a way to make a plan from the start and forcing it to happen. This is probably a bad approach at higher levels, but it's giving me a chance to grasp the dynamics of chess.

    ANYWAY, this game I played this morning is very important to me! I played a backwards position as black.. and had a good time watching my opponent move pieces around aimlessly, even though he seemed like a better play at first.

     

    How LONG does it take to get better by the way? I've been playing chess almost daily for over a month now and it feels like it's taking forever to get any good at it. Then I make stupid mistakes like b6! 

    Any insights would be greatly appreciated, esp. on my Knight back to g8 move!


     Ng8 is fine, as long as you get it to a good spot, which you technically did, protecting h7 from any huge attack. I've been playing chess since 3rd grade, and I've slowly improved by playing the best I can to the best of my ability. It's not hard to just relax and focus, even during a blitz game. If you're in a bad position, just sit for a little bit and think. Smile Good day!

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #134

    GIex

    theunderground702:

    It's good you see it's important to add your explanation to the moves. This also allows you to take some time and examine the moves in detail.

    If you can't explain why you have made a move, you probably didn't understand the position, so this can be a clue on what to work over. Going over your finished games and analyzing them, especially the ones you have lost, is a very good (and somehow necessary) way to improve your play. No matter how much time you spend on improving, if you budget that time correctly, you will improve, and the better you budget it, the faster you will improve. A general principle is to work on your weaknesses. Simply eliminating one possible mistake from every game will increase your rating by about 100 points Laughing The more mistakes you make now, the more you can eliminate if you work on that, and the higher rating you can achieve Laughing

    About the game: it was an Indian Game that went out of book early. The position after 4.e4 could be reached from several different openings, for example the Pirc Defense, the Modern Defense, Alekhine Defense: Scandinavian Variation, and others, depending on the move order.

    You are right that 6.exd6? is not a good move. It allows 6...cxd6 (as you did), that is an exchange of a Black's side pawn for White's central one. Moreover, White didn't need to spend so many moves to achieve that. He could have kept his pawn on e4, because it was not threatened, and it was giving him control of d5 and f5, so you weren't able to put a minor piece (currently your c6 knight) there. He could have developed another pieces with those moves instead.

    About 13...0-0 instead of 13...Bxb5: White's light squared bishop is usually considered to be White's most valuable minor piece, because it can attack f7 which is the hardest square for Black to defend. Also, if Black castles kingside, that bishop can pin Black's f7 pawn to his king, and force Black to make some move to remove the pin that may have a negative impact on his game plans (as any other forced move). Many White's checkmate attacks involve a white light squared bishop placed on the a2-g8 diagonal. So it's usually considered that Black should seek a light bishop exchange if possible. On the other hand, it's unlikely that White was going to retreat his bishop after 12...Bd7, because 12...Bd7 is the most natural way Black could reply to 12.Bb5+, and White should have expected it. That's why you could play 13...0-0 after 13.Nf3 - White was willing to exchange his bishop (although it's not sound), and you should wait for 14.Bxd7 Qxd7. This way you won a tempo (in comparison with 13...Bxb5 14.Nxb5 0-0).

    18...b6! is a very good move, because it prevents 19.c5 dxc5 20.bxc5, where White could get a passed pawn after c6, ...bxc6, dxc6 after preparation. It was probably the most appropriate reply to 18.c4. It sopped White's queenside pawn advance, because 19.c5? can be met by bxc5 20.bxc5 Qxd4 (removing White's control of c5) 21.Nxd4 dxc5, winning a pawn.

    After 18...b6!, White has no obvious way to make progress, in other words, no obvious way to win. That's because he exchanged too many pieces and now he doesn't have enough material to start a kingside attack, because he was careless enough to liquidate his pawn center at the very beginning (instead of fortifying it and making it work for him) and at the cost of moves he could have used for development, and because his progress on the queenside has just been refuted. After 18...b6!, you already had a strategically won game because of your solid pawn structure, your king safety, and White's weakness - his backward c4 pawn, that is denied pawn protection. You could put pressure on it by placing a rook (or rooks) on the c file that would tie your opponent to defending c4. Then you could go for a kingside or central pawn push supported by your king since you had a pawn majority, and your opponent would be unable to defend both. It was a matter of time until you won, one way or another Laughing

    Good luck! Laughing

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #135

    Kittysafe

    theunderground702 wrote:

    I'm noticing that people are just posting games with no self-analysis or comments. The point of this thread is to write why you are making moves and what you think of them, so that better players can go from there and help you out.


    Sorry about that, I'll work on it.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #136

    jetfighter13

    can people please post thier analysese in diagrams that way we are not scrolling back and forth

    oh and here is one of mine where i eventualy got into a totaly lost position then my opponent blunders the game

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #137

    melvinbluestone

    But jetfighter13, why didn't you play 11. d5, a pawn fork of black's bishop and knight? If it looks unsafe before castling, you still could have played it at move 13. Am I missing something?

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #138

    jetfighter13

    melvinbluestone wrote:

    But jetfighter13, why didn't you play 11. d5, a pawn fork of black's bishop and knight? If it looks unsafe before castling, you still could have played it at move 13. Am I missing something?


     no you are quite right i missed it can you analyse it in a diagram though

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #139

    melvinbluestone

    Certainly! I love acting like I know something.....(ha ha!). Here's the position after 12...Kb8.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #140

    Thomas_Vandeputte

    jetfighter13 wrote:

    here is another i just won i feel this was a good game, i dont know how to analyse some of these moves


    30. Re8#


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