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  • 3 years ago · Quote · #221

    JCarter1

    This is a game I played earlier today:

     

    Any feedback is much appreciated!

    Thanks,

    Jason

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #222

    Thomas_Vandeputte

    KageLord wrote:

    Yes, Thomas, 11. Bxd5 is better. His bishop is pinned to his king, so he can't move it and you are going to get it (probably completely free) next turn. His position was about hopeless either way though. Nice checkmate to end it!

    Now that I think about it though, 11. Qh5+ is probably best of all. He is guaranteed to lose both of those minors and the only question left is how long it will take to mate his very poorly placed king


    Thanks for your analysis! I didn't notice 11. Qh5+ was even a better move. I missed the moves to gain the most material, so I think I was quite lucky he couldn't find the best response to my checks. Did I play other incorrect moves you think? (I never went to a chess club or something)

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #223

    Thomas_Vandeputte

    JCarter1 wrote:

    This is a game I played earlier today:

     

    Any feedback is much appreciated!

    Thanks,

    Jason


    Good analysis. I think you'd better develloped your bishop to d3 immediately. Now it took you 2 extra moves to get on that diagonal. For the rest, nice game and well found draw by repitition.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #224

    Chessmonger330

    JCarter1 wrote:

    This is a game I played earlier today:

     

    Any feedback is much appreciated!

    Thanks,

    Jason


    hmm... well played but I think Bc4 was a slight positional blunder.  You should have played c4 and d5 to open up the d-file and take andvantage of the weak d6 square.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #225

    MaverickM

    JCarter1 wrote:

    This is a game I played earlier today:

     

    Any feedback is much appreciated!

    Thanks,

    Jason


    You played very good Jason. But I think rather than rook sacrifice you could have possibly moved f4 to challenge black pawn because black queen was not on king side and there was no immediate possibility of king side attack and queen side was closed at that moment.

    Even though black could have advanced the pawn still it would provide white more space to play with.

    These are just my thoughts and I'm an amateur so sorry if I am missing something.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #226

    GIex

    JCarter1 wrote:

    This is a game I played earlier today:

     

    Any feedback is much appreciated!

    Thanks,

    Jason


    After 4.Nxe4, this is the Caro formation which arises from the French Defense and some other openings. The d and e files are semi-open; Black has exchanged his d pawn for White's e pawn; White has a 4th rank pawn on the d file, and Black has no 5th rank pawn.

    There are different possible game plans for White. If Black plays passively (he doesn't prepare a ...c5 or an ...e5 break), the easiest plan for White is a kingside attack, because he is not challenged for center control and can use the e5 square as an outpost - relocating a rook with Re1-e5 (possibly h5 too), placing a knight at e5. The other rook can be lifted and placed along the h file. A good pawn break is h4-h5.

    White can also prepare a d4-d5 break with g3, Bg2, rooks at d1 and e1, queen and bishop on the a1-h8 diagonal.

    Black can establish counterplay with a ...c5 or an ...e5 pawn break. That can lead to opening the center and giving more opportunities to Black.

    In the game you played, you used the Re1-e5-h5 and Re1-h3 rook lifts, and the h4-h5 pawn push, which are all a part of the kingside attack strategy. Your kingside attack was not enough effective for you to win, because you had exchanged many pieces before it, and started it relatively late (at the 20.Rxe5 position the two knights pairs and dark squared bishops pair had been exchanged while you hadn't made an attack yet), so you had difficulty to exploit your kingside space advantage. At the Caro formation, Black's piece play is often blocked by his pawns, especially his light squared bishop, and if White manages to tie them to defending the center or the queenside (by making Black defend against a possible d5 push for example), he can use his space advantage to launch kingside pawn pushes without allowing many piece exchanges. You could have played c4, Nc3 and Bd3 early, castle kingside and bring rooks to the d and e files. Then if a d5 break would have resulted in a good position for you, you could play it, otherwise lift the rooks and play a h pawn push. Of course, it depends on what Black would have played as a response.

    Anyway, you had a better than Black's game until the 29th move (that's because he didn't initiate any counterplay). After 28...Qc7, Black had a bad light squared bishop (a common feature in the Caro that he didn't manage to cope with), while material was equal, he had a kingside pawn majority, and you - a queenside one. Black had a worse position, because of his bad bishop that couldn't have supported a pawn push (since all but your a pawn were on dark squares), while you could have prepared f4-f5 by, for example, f4, Qf3, g4 and then f5. You would have got an open e file at least, and maybe an even bigger kingside liquidation, and you should have a better game after that. In case Black had repositioned his bishop to guard f5 (or has organised another prevention), you could have prepared a c4 push by b3 and Bd3, which would also have allowed you to maintain the f5 push threat, and Black wouldn't have been able to defend both. Anyway, a draw is probably not a bad result too, because many pawn exchanges could have freed Black's bishop and improved his position. But he wouldn't have been able to prepare them himself from the 28...Qc7 position, so he didn't have good winning chances.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #227

    Flangribaz

    jetfighter13 wrote:
    Flangribaz wrote:
    jetfighter13 wrote:
    Flangribaz wrote:
    jetfighter13 wrote:

    how bout th edouble exclam move ,does it deserve those


    I dunno.  What's your rating?  At the level of 800-1000 maybe.  Above that it's a simple one move tactic. 


     read the annotations on it


    I've already read them.  So? 


     consider the implications of said move


    What implications?  I don't think you're understanding what I'm saying.  You asked me if it deserved the double exclam you gave it.  I'm saying at the level of 800-1000, maybe one exclam.  Above that it's a simple one move tactic and really, IMO, shouldn't be getting an exclam.  Sorry to burst your bubble. 

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #228

    jetfighter13

    what do you all think about this game

    in a diagram please

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #229

    GIex

    jetfighter13 wrote:

    what do you all think about this game

    in a diagram please


    White's game was literally full of mistakes, beginning with 2.a4? that loosens control over the b4 square and has no clear purpose so early in the game, but lets Black take the initiative instead. 9.Nxd5?? is pointless and losing material. From White's 11th to his 23rd move all were either pointless, leading to a worse position or a simple waste of time (his queen's rook and light squared bishop travels) while his king was under pressure. 24.Rg2, 25.Qxf3, 26.Rbg1, 27.Rxg2 were all forced and were leading to a forced checkmate that Black missed by 27.Rh7?! instead of 27.Rxh2! Kxh2 28.Rh8+ Kg1 29. Qd1+ Be1 30.Qxe1#.

    On the other hand, Black could have also performed better. 6.g6?! and 7.Bg7?! resulted in a blocked dark squared bishop for Black, while he could have deployed it to b4 (that had been weakened by 2.a4?) to keep it in play. 8.0-0-0? was dangerous, having in mind that White had both of his bishops (and one move later his queen too) attacking the queenside, and that White had an advanced a pawn that he could have successfully used in an attack against Black's king, starting with 9.a5! instead of the strange 9.Nxd5?, then b4-b5 and bringing his king's rook to the queenside too. (Also, Black's king's bishop would hinder his rooks' play at the kingside, which was one more reason for Black not to castle queenside in addition to compromising his king safety.) That didn't happen though, as White went for a hardly explainable fourteen move streak instead, that led to his loss.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #230

    GIex

    Here's my analysis of KageLord's game:

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #231

    jetfighter13

    some one analyse this one, has a queen sac ( a horid one at that) and it features a histerical mate i won it of course, but should have lost. This Game is King Lenny Approved

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #232

    pauix

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #233

    Thomas_Vandeputte

    jetfighter13 wrote:

    some one analyse this one, has a queen sac ( a horid one at that) and it features a histerical mate i won it of course, but should have lost. This Game is King Lenny Approved


    2.Bc4: Prevents the powerfull Kf7??

    I think Kf7 must be the worst move in the opening :p.

    2.Bc4 was played to develop the bishop to a good square and targetting the weakened f7 square, maybe with the intention of preventing you to castle kingside for the short term.

    9.Bxc3 Here your opponent is standing way better. He has almost finished development and has more center control. After 9 moves, you only have your knight developped, due to the many needless pawn moves. These pawn moves have also blocked in your light squared bishop and queenside knight.

    12.gxf6 Your kingside is now very weak. The most of your army is on the queenside. You were lucky your opponent didn't find the best moves to exploit that.

    13.Nf5 When you have no clear plan, it's better to get your other pieces out instead of moving a piece twice. Nd7 would have been better.

    14. Qg8 There really is no quick kill because his king is to safe. You more blocked in your rook on the h-file.

    15. g3 Needless move. Bb1 was way more active.

    18. Rg1 followed by g4 would have won your knight.

    19-22: Very inaccurate play. You lost a pawn and a queen for a bishop with no compensation at all. You even gave your opponent a strong pass pawn.

    24. c6?? Bc7 was way better.

    27. hxc3???? Waaw, what a blunder!! fxc3 was the obvious correct move.

    Thomas

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #234

    Thomas_Vandeputte

    pauix wrote:

     


    There is actually a mate in 3 at the end. After 14. Bxd6, which is his very best move, you have the very strong Qxf6!

    If he plays Qxf6, he loses because of the nice mate Nxf6#.

    If he plays Bf8 ( his only other defense to the mate tread on g7) , you can take his queen with Qxd8 and mate on f8 is unstoppable.

    Thomas

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #235

    winnersp

    panafricain wrote:

     

    A bullet game I played against a stronger opponent. The game is worth for the final combination

    maybe its a draw...
  • 3 years ago · Quote · #236

    jetfighter13

    well i did have some counter play on that last one, if i had taken his queen i would be in a winning endgame

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #237

    winnersp

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 3 years ago · Quote · #238

    jetfighter13

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 3 years ago · Quote · #239

    winnersp

    a bishop sacrifice win beauty~ the queen correct move needed of course.
  • 3 years ago · Quote · #240

    stephnlawrnce

    Panafricain,

    After 23.....ke7  Re1 wins

     

    steve


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