Upgrade to Chess.com Premium!

Why no books by experts ??


  • 14 months ago · Quote · #1

    chessmaster102

    Surely a expert writing a book about his own games would be useful to 1500 and lower players which is the populations majority so why hasn't a expert made one.

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #2

    zborg

    No Buyers.  Very Simple Economics.

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #3

    InfiniteFlash

    Usually books, articles, submitted papers are written by professionals. 

     "expert level chess players" ----> amateurs -----> can make money if they choose by tutoring people. They simply will not get recognized, if they write a book, because their rating is too weak.

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #4

    zezpwn44

    Because we experts don't know enough about chess :p.

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #5

    FirebrandX

    johnsmithson wrote:

    Experts are good chess players.  Until you start writing down their moves and subjecting them to careful analysis. 

    Only if the expert decided to write a book entirely on their own games, and they stank and writing and annotating. Remember that chess skill doesn't mean the person also sucks at writing or annotating. An expert in all reality should be able to annotate just as well as anyone else provided they have a passion and a talent for doing it. They can show you where they went wrong and right without sounding like a clueless idiot.

    The main reason you don't see many of such books is because the naive biasedness towards titles that every beginner thinks means a "stronger" book for them to use. Even with that, there's been somewhat successful books written by even C-B class players, like the author of "Zuke'em".

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #6

    Mandy711

    There is one chess book titled "Chess Words of Wisdom" by Mike Henebry who is an expert player only. Those looking for expert authored books should buy this.

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #7

    chessmaster102

    FirebrandX wrote:
    johnsmithson wrote:

    Experts are good chess players.  Until you start writing down their moves and subjecting them to careful analysis. 

    Only if the expert decided to write a book entirely on their own games, and they stank and writing and annotating. Remember that chess skill doesn't mean the person also sucks at writing or annotating. An expert in all reality should be able to annotate just as well as anyone else provided they have a passion and a talent for doing it. They can show you where they went wrong and right without sounding like a clueless idiot.

    The main reason you don't see many of such books is because the naive biasedness towards titles that every beginner thinks means a "stronger" book for them to use. Even with that, there's been somewhat successful books written by even C-B class players, like the author of "Zuke'em".

    wow really any other books made by class level players or provide there intake on matters in a book ?

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #8

    chessmaster102

    Perhaps a book by a expert simply describing his trainng and what it took in detail and how he went about it to get to his level. Thats gotta be usful to the general public or a expert presenting his games in a "guess the move"/solitare chess approach should be a great training tool for the budding amatures ??

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #9

    HappyUngulate

    chessmaster102 wrote:

    Perhaps a book by a expert simply describing his trainng and what it took in detail and how he went about it to get to his level. Thats gotta be usful to the general public or a expert presenting his games in a "guess the move"/solitare chess approach should be a great training tool for the budding amatures ??

    That's pretty much what Michael de la Maza did with his – somewhat controversial – Rapid Chess Improvement. Apart from that, I think there's a couple of useful tactics collections. John Bain's Chess Tactics for Students and Al Woolums The Chess Tactics Workbook come to mind, but I'd have to double check whether those two are't titled players after all.

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #10

    Ziryab

    chessmaster102 wrote:

    Perhaps a book by a expert simply describing his trainng and what it took in detail and how he went about it to get to his level. Thats gotta be usful to the general public or a expert presenting his games in a "guess the move"/solitare chess approach should be a great training tool for the budding amatures ??

    I'm not yet an expert, and my book is a work in progress. But, it is free.

    http://chessskill.blogspot.com/

    BTW, I will not abandon chess as M. de la Maza did when I make expert. He's a snake oil saleman looking for fools. If you buy his book, buy a used copy so as to deprive him of additional royalties. 

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #11

    DENVERHIGH

    Why buy a book written by and expert whose USCF rating is 200 - 2199? When you can buy a book written by a three time U.S.A. champion, three times Ukranian Champion and former European Champion, Grandmaster . . . LEV ALBURT.

    It is titled "Chess for the Gifted and Busy" It is a short comprehensive course from Beginner to Expert. It is about 300 pages. Then the afterward gives you suggestion to go from Expert to Master which the U.S.C.F rating is 2200 and up.

    The books list at $19.95 U.S. I just purchased a copy through Amazon at under $10.00 dollars and shipped for $2.99. It was a used copy. Amazingly it is brand new.

    Of course it covers unnecessary beginning material that I read, just because. I'm reading and playing it so I will not miss anything that I'm supposed to know to get ti the end of the book. I believe that I will improve my chess knowledge.

    Most people buy a book and the pick, and hop and skip to different part that they might find interesting, then the book ends up on a book shelf, or just laying on the bed. They didn't even make the moves on the board, because they feel they can do it in their heads. I have done that very thing.

    I don't plan to do that with this book. I will play the whole things that is my goal.

     
  • 14 months ago · Quote · #12

    crtexxx

    That's like saying that DanHeisman's nooks and books are not as good as the average GM's, when it is probably much better in reality...

    maza's book is totaly garbage lol...

    He basically had no life outside of chess and studied it as if his life depended on it. I'm sure we could all get to his level...if we simply wanted to do that..

    I myself did it for a few weeks in earlier 2012, but I couldn't carry on much longer.


Back to Top

Post your reply: