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How to know when to Resign


  • 3 years ago · Quote · #21

    Elubas

    Well, he has a right to hope that you hallucinate for one second and stalemate him :)

    I don't know why people would want to do that, but they have every right to if they so choose, and I would never have a problem with it.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #22

    mateologist

    The decision to surrender your king belongs to you NOT your opponent. Elubas said it once i will say it twice no one is Suppose to resign! Sure there are games where they play on in a hopeless position my job is to find the quickest kill not embarass my Opponent !! LOL
  • 3 years ago · Quote · #23

    RainbowRising

    Well, if he has the right not to resign, I have the right not to checkmate him ;)

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #24

    meniscus

    WOW! Posting this educated me. That's a first from your pathetic writing. I learned thatt you actually *could* be made to look like even more of a d*** than anyone who knows you already thought you were. You'll be the first chess.com member that I've ever blocked in my 3 years here, and that's so your annoying crap doesn't come up on my page anymore. Congrats! 

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #25

    meniscus

    Love how *suspected* proggers always join the cheating forum. Good riddance! Suspected, by the way, means that's not an accusation. His "rainbow just rose" from 1300 level play 2 years ago a little quickly for yours truly to not suspect. By the way, apologies to others: it's personal. The guy unfriended me for disabling chat about a year and a half ago, because some of us don't talk during 1min games. I believe his comment to me would make the above look like a love letter. A true jerk, that one. Again, good riddance.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #26

    meniscus

    Elubas wrote:

    You resign whenever you want. It's that simple. Resigning in my opinion is more of a convenience for the losing player than the winning player; it is basically a way out of misery. It's a bad habit to "expect" resignation. I think that this expectation developed when players (of any era!) got used to a certain typical point of resignation. That shouldn't change the fact that the fundamental point of resignation is to, again, allow yourself out of misery.

    Although it can be used to show respect to a player, this should not be the priority. It's more important that the losing player fights for as long as he wants than for the winning player to get a quick win he feels he deserves.


    Thanks. You respost others' losing games in public forums typically by making them anonymous as well.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #27

    vanhafford

    Never Resign! 

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #28

    Elubas

    meniscus wrote:
    Elubas wrote:

    You resign whenever you want. It's that simple. Resigning in my opinion is more of a convenience for the losing player than the winning player; it is basically a way out of misery. It's a bad habit to "expect" resignation. I think that this expectation developed when players (of any era!) got used to a certain typical point of resignation. That shouldn't change the fact that the fundamental point of resignation is to, again, allow yourself out of misery.

    Although it can be used to show respect to a player, this should not be the priority. It's more important that the losing player fights for as long as he wants than for the winning player to get a quick win he feels he deserves.


    Thanks. You respost others' losing games in public forums typically by making them anonymous as well.


    "respost?" I'm not sure what you mean.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #29

    RainbowRising

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #30

    -waller-

    Why do I not get to play 1800s like that? Seriously though, Bxa6 made me triple-take.

    Plus, 89...g1=R is a smidgen more accurate. Just sayin'.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #31

    JayLefler

    RainbowRising wrote:

     


    I'm not sure what this proves. It obviously isn't a real game. No 1800 player (or a player with a rating much less then that) would make the kinds of moves made here.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #32

    RainbowRising

    -waller- wrote:

    Why do I not get to play 1800s like that? Seriously though, Bxa6 made me triple-take.

    Plus, 89...g1=R is a smidgen more accurate. Just sayin'.


    Yes, I misclicked when promoting :(

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #33

    CarlosDiaz1

    Amazing..

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #34

    NachtWulf

    The first time was funny, but the redundancies seemed pointless at best.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #35

    blowerd

    RainbowRising wrote:

    Well, if he has the right not to resign, I have the right not to checkmate him ;)

    Your opponent in game 3 would have had the right to claim a 3 time repetition of position draw after move 129 Qf6+. 

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #36

    melogibbo

    can't believe some of the poor play for such high rated players.  I feel the same when people should clearly resign, I might try this in future, made me laugh, nice one.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #37

    RainbowRising

    Thanks melogibbo!

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #38

    Elubas

    I'm going to ask a question to those who get annoyed by those who don't resign: If a win is really so easy from a certain position, how is it annoying if an opponent makes you play it out? Say you're up a queen -- if it's so easy, then wouldn't it be a painless task to finish the opponent off? I get the feeling that instead these people know they can win easily if they focus, but they simply don't feel like focusing for another ten minutes and instead want the win handed to them as painlessly as possible.

     Being able to consistently pay attention to any last threats is a part of the game. If I play on down a rook, it's not because I think that I'm going to get back into the game; it's because I want to force my opponent to still be alert, and not get impatient.

    In the case of this game, your opponent forced you to stay alert by not delivering stalemate. I'm sure you were fully aware of stalemate and were totally alert about it; but at least he forced you to make sure that you were alert. Forcing your opponent to keep his eyes on the board psychologically makes sense, because if the opponent, perhaps, doesn't want to keep his eyes on the board because he feels his position is winning, that reduces the quality of his play and makes him just a tad more vulnerable.

    I, personally, do resign, but I don't have the slightest problem with someone playing on right up until checkmate, even if he were a grandmaster. I totally respect their right to keep me honest, no matter how simple the situation.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #39

    mastershredder

    RainbowRising wrote:
    artfizz wrote:

    In the second game, isn't your queen on the wrong colour at move 67? I can see why your opponent would be embarrassed.


    In the second example, I was white, my pieces were on blacks starting squares as I was pretending to be black.

    LMAO!!!!!!! sets up pieces pretending to be black! Game 2 is hilarious. That is the most humiliating thing I've ever seen, and the guy is like 1700 so you know he's shaking his head but he's such an optimist he's gonna cross his fingers for that draw. The only thing that would make this better is if it was a live OTB tournament game, and we had video of it. lmao. Too good. Well done.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #40

    SanWogi

    The other thing one might discuss is: When shouldn't I resign?

    I often resign instantly after a blunder because I feel that i messed it up and my opponent will win easily. But sometimes I realize later, that I still had good drawing chances. One game I wanted to resign against a lower rated opponent because I made an opening blunder. But I could resist these tempting feelings and won the game.


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