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If only I always played like this


  • 3 years ago · Quote · #1

    Trevor39

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #2

    StevenBailey13

    Great game!

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #3

    Trevor39

    Thanks guys

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #4

    Trevor39

    I like to believe I played good in the opening and controlled the game to a certain extent with forced moves. The only real mistake my opponent made was not seeing the mate at the end.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #5

    ponz111

    Nice game, keep it in your collection of well played games. 

     

    Your opponent made many real mistakes however.  

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #6

    Trevor39

    That's two people who have said my opponent made lots of mistakes. As far as I can see it his only two mistakes were the eighth move, bringing the knight in the centre d4 instead of continuing to develop the rest of his major pieces. And, not spoting the obvious mate at the end. If indeed there were more mistakes by my opponent, please highlight them, otherwise I feel as if your just trying to belittle how well I played by stating I won only from mistakes my opponent made.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #7

    Metaknight251

    You certainly did play well.  Nxd4+ was a good tactic.  However, your opponent did commit suicide with 8.Nd4??.  You did take advantage of this very well.  All in all, a good game. 

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #8

    Irontiger

    You want to know the black mistakes ?

    3...e5 (?) creates a weak d5 square for nothing.

    4...h6 ? loses a tempo.

    and 8...Nd4 ?? misses the following moves.

    On your side, 8.Qe2 does not make much sense to me, from a general point of view, but especially when there is 8.Nxe4 ! and Black has lost a pawn because the bishop hangs and 8...Bxd1 ?? leads to Legal's mate after 9.Bxf7+ Ke7 10.Nd4#, but besides this your play was perfect to my eyes.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #9

    nameno1had

    Franken_Berry wrote:

    I think it was more your opponent's incompetence rather than your brilliance.

    I hate when I feel that way about my play, but as I have gotten better and had to try to make heads or tails of either mine or my opponent's play, chess.com analysis makes it confusing sometimes to figure out who did what...

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #10

    learningthemoves

    nameno1had wrote:
    Franken_Berry wrote:

    I think it was more your opponent's incompetence rather than your brilliance.

    I hate when I feel that way about my play, but as I have gotten better and had to try to make heads or tails of either mine or my opponent's play, chess.com analysis makes it confusing sometimes to figure out who did what...

    Some may have made the mistake of thinking this was the analysis forum instead of the Game Showcase forum.

    Don't worry. A few of the slower ones did the same to me and many others I'm sure, too. Tongue Out

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #11

    konhidras

    Hey Trevor, it aint your fault if your oponent blunders. But it would definetly be your fault if you let the chances slip away. You had a chance at brilliancy and you succeeded. I say "keep it up kid!" and keep posting games like this. Aah! the good old-Morphy days is back!

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #12

    nameno1had

    I guess for me it would be difficult to see anyone showcasing games here unless they are GM's, IM's, FM's, etc. I think most people would be taking credit for great play when their opponent just wasn't playing so well.

    That is why I would generally always put mine in the analysis forum, unless I beat a much higher rated player.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #13

    VanillaKnightPOC

    You brutally punish your opponent for his substandard development. Well done.:D

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #14

    bankoscarpa

    Nice Job! 

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #15

    bastiaan

    Irontiger wrote:

    You want to know the black mistakes ?

    3...e5 (?) creates a weak d5 square for nothing.

    4...h6 ? loses a tempo.

    and 8...Nd4 ?? misses the following moves.

    On your side, 8.Qe2 does not make much sense to me, from a general point of view, but especially when there is 8.Nxe4 ! and Black has lost a pawn because the bishop hangs and 8...Bxd1 ?? leads to Legal's mate after 9.Bxf7+ Ke7 10.Nd4#, but besides this your play was perfect to my eyes.

    I agree, missing the mate was only one mistake. The most structural error was creating a weakness on d5, and ignoring it the entire game. What you did well is using that weakness to your advantage. Black should and could have at least played Nf6 somewhere

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #16

    Master_Kann

    bastiaan wrote:
    Irontiger wrote:

    You want to know the black mistakes ?

    3...e5 (?) creates a weak d5 square for nothing.

    4...h6 ? loses a tempo.

    and 8...Nd4 ?? misses the following moves.

    On your side, 8.Qe2 does not make much sense to me, from a general point of view, but especially when there is 8.Nxe4 ! and Black has lost a pawn because the bishop hangs and 8...Bxd1 ?? leads to Legal's mate after 9.Bxf7+ Ke7 10.Nd4#, but besides this your play was perfect to my eyes.

    I agree, missing the mate was only one mistake. The most structural error was creating a weakness on d5, and ignoring it the entire game. What you did well is using that weakness to your advantage. Black should and could have at least played Nf6 somewhere

    No.  3. ... e5 was not a mistake.  It sacrifices control of d5 for d4.  The move is recommended in Starting Out: The Sveshnikov.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #17

    bastiaan

    Master_Kann wrote:
    bastiaan wrote:
    Irontiger wrote:

    You want to know the black mistakes ?

    3...e5 (?) creates a weak d5 square for nothing.

    4...h6 ? loses a tempo.

    and 8...Nd4 ?? misses the following moves.

    On your side, 8.Qe2 does not make much sense to me, from a general point of view, but especially when there is 8.Nxe4 ! and Black has lost a pawn because the bishop hangs and 8...Bxd1 ?? leads to Legal's mate after 9.Bxf7+ Ke7 10.Nd4#, but besides this your play was perfect to my eyes.

    I agree, missing the mate was only one mistake. The most structural error was creating a weakness on d5, and ignoring it the entire game. What you did well is using that weakness to your advantage. Black should and could have at least played Nf6 somewhere

    No.  3. ... e5 was not a mistake.  It sacrifices control of d5 for d4.  The move is recommended in Starting Out: The Sveshnikov.

    I do remember the move 3..e5 in a line of opening, but black needs a good reason giving up control of d5. Ignoring the weakness it left there was the biggest mistake by black in my opinion.
    I do see black attempting to gain d4, but don't you think d4 (in general) is more easily met by white's c3, where there are no pawns left for black to solve the d4 problem? Maybe it's just personal taste whether 3..e5 is a good choice, but doing nothing about the d4 weakness was fatal for black

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #18

    Master_Kann

    bastiaan wrote:
    Master_Kann wrote:
    bastiaan wrote:
    Irontiger wrote:

    You want to know the black mistakes ?

    3...e5 (?) creates a weak d5 square for nothing.

    4...h6 ? loses a tempo.

    and 8...Nd4 ?? misses the following moves.

    On your side, 8.Qe2 does not make much sense to me, from a general point of view, but especially when there is 8.Nxe4 ! and Black has lost a pawn because the bishop hangs and 8...Bxd1 ?? leads to Legal's mate after 9.Bxf7+ Ke7 10.Nd4#, but besides this your play was perfect to my eyes.

    I agree, missing the mate was only one mistake. The most structural error was creating a weakness on d5, and ignoring it the entire game. What you did well is using that weakness to your advantage. Black should and could have at least played Nf6 somewhere

    No.  3. ... e5 was not a mistake.  It sacrifices control of d5 for d4.  The move is recommended in Starting Out: The Sveshnikov.

    I do remember the move 3..e5 in a line of opening, but black needs a good reason giving up control of d5. Ignoring the weakness it left there was the biggest mistake by black in my opinion.
    I do see black attempting to gain d4, but don't you think d4 (in general) is more easily met by white's c3, where there are no pawns left for black to solve the d4 problem? Maybe it's just personal taste whether 3..e5 is a good choice, but doing nothing about the d4 weakness was fatal for black

    Well, yes.  Black should have probably placed his Bishop on e6 and his Knight on f6, the opening wasn't bad, it was how he played it.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #20

    ponz111

    Don't expect to play a perfect game. You played a very nice game in general. For you to play such a nice game--your opponent had to make at least one mistake.  Your opponent made more than 2 mistakes but in a chess game there are usually several mistakes by both sides.

    Be satisfied with playing such a very nice game but understand even GMs may not play a perfect game.


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