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White Pussy Cat


  • 3 years ago · Quote · #1

    RainbowRising

    The object of chess is to win via checkmate, so I really hate it when white plays to draw. As such, below is a game where I smashed my draw seeking white opponent.

     

     

    Play to win next time Mr Cat ;)

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #2

    ivandh

    Um.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #3

    pathfinder416

    Rainbow Rising, you are grossly mistaken. White was playing to lose (6.Bg6).

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #4

    Ziryab

    pathfinder416 wrote:

    Rainbow Rising, you are grossly mistaken. White was playing to lose (6.Bg6).


    My thoughts exactly!

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #5

    Svekke

    Whats so bad by playing for a draw? Especially in tournaments you see it a lot that in the last games, players play for a draw to secure their places.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #6

    Ziryab

    Svekke wrote:

    Whats so bad by playing for a draw? Especially in tournaments you see it a lot that in the last games, players play for a draw to secure their places.


    That's not the case in this online blitz game.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #7

    Svekke

    And how do you see he's playing for a draw? And what's bad about it?

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #8

    RainbowRising

    Svekke, dw about it, you clearly dont understand, for whatever reason

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #9

    Ziryab

    Svekke wrote:

    And how do you see he's playing for a draw? And what's bad about it?


    He is using a passive-aggressive opening designed to make few errors, but also eschewing the natural advantage of the white pieces. Instead of seeking the initiative, he is hoping for a strategic or tactical blunder by his opponent (alas, white made these errors because he faced a competent and prepared opponent). White's strategy is a useful one for mid-range club players, but is a terribly weak strategy for facing the level of competition he should seek given his rating.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #10

    Cry_Wolf

    Ziryab is very correct. White should not play moves like c3 and e3 like that. Personally, I think it's stupid to play anything but 2. c4 in response to 1. d4 d5, but of course that's just my opinion. I am by nature a violent player. If someone plays 1. d4 d5 2. Nf3 against me, my natural reply is 2. ... c5. Blood! Blood! Blood! :)

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #11

    pauix

    Cry_Wolf wrote:

    Ziryab is very correct. White should not play moves like c3 and e3 like that. Personally, I think it's stupid to play anything but 2. c4 in response to 1. d4 d5, but of course that's just my opinion. I am by nature a violent player. If someone plays 1. d4 d5 2. Nf3 against me, my natural reply is 2. ... c5. Blood! Blood! Blood! :)


    And I'd only play 2...e5!? To answer 2.c4. If you want blood, I won't say no!Tongue out

    And this 2...c5?! seems interesting, I'll try it if I ever meet 2.Nf3 again!

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #12

    Bojanglesryan

    its just online chess people. dont get so worked up about it:)

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #13

    RainbowRising

    Another Vorlock crush

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #14

    AnthonyCG

    Wow you really wanted to win lol.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #15

    Elubas

    Ziryab wrote:
    Svekke wrote:

    And how do you see he's playing for a draw? And what's bad about it?


    He is using a passive-aggressive opening designed to make few errors, but also eschewing the natural advantage of the white pieces. Instead of seeking the initiative, he is hoping for a strategic or tactical blunder by his opponent (alas, white made these errors because he faced a competent and prepared opponent). White's strategy is a useful one for mid-range club players, but is a terribly weak strategy for facing the level of competition he should seek given his rating.


    He has a right to play any way he wants. He has a right to give away his queen if that makes him happy. He's not hurting anyone by the way he plays.

    I wouldn't call it a terribly weak strategy -- extremely strong grandmasters, like Magnus Carlsen, show that even at their level, you don't always need an advantage out of the opening if you can grind your opponent down in the long-term. Magnus plays openings like the King's Gambit; he says he doesn't even prepare that much, often not freaking out if he gives his opponent equality. If it works for him, it's probably not that bad. As long as you can follow up with good play, almost any opening can be a pain in the ass to beat. Imagine trying to beat a computer from a superior opening position -- their resourcefulness will make up for their inferior position.

    This time, his strategy didn't work. Openings like these will probably score a slightly lower percentage; but it's pretty slight because most of the game is played outside the opening.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #17

    Elubas

    lol, poor vorlock :)

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #18

    RainbowRising

    A great example of why not to play like a pussy cat and then open up your KS:



  • 2 years ago · Quote · #19

    Elubas

    Another person being publicly mocked. We really had to see how "bad this guy was at chess," and how good you were, didn't we?

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #20

    AnthonyCG

    Well it was 13 months ago lol.


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