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A Look at the King's Gambit.


  • 20 months ago · Quote · #21

    DrFrank124c

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 20 months ago · Quote · #22

    DrFrank124c

    wonderinguy wrote:

    I am not expert in these lines , but think here white can play simply 3.Bc4 and black have some problems with development .

     



    What I wanted to say is that Black has to be careful in this position because White has a possible Knight Sacrifice, after playing Bc4 White can possibly play Nxe5 and then Qh5+ winning material or possible mating Black.

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #23

    wonderinguy

    I think, Hotwax proved with the material he posted , that white can play Nxe5 only if they are ready for all the complications after . I have never learned KG lines , or Damiano and if i have to play white i probably will play Bc4 in the next position too.



  • 20 months ago · Quote · #24

    DrFrank124c

    After 3.Bc4 if Black is not careful and plays a weak move he can wind up in trouble.

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #25

    wonderinguy

    I am accepting  the move 3...a6  like a nice personal  gesture ! And the board is very nice :)

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #26

    Gil-Gandel

    batgirl wrote:

    Almost everyone knows Black playing f6 in the King's Gambit is a courtship with disaster.  At least once or twice a month, however, I play someone who moves f6, usually on move 2.

    I played this game earlier today:

     

    Black lost, but after the game I was wondering if it was 2...f6 that caused the quick loss, or just our rating difference.  I never play ...f6 as Black in the KG, so my only real dealing with it has been with players who aren't particularly familiar with the opening or who aren't experienced enough to put up much resistance.  So, I got to looking at the ...f6 line more closely.  Now, I don't condone this move in the least and feel it's ultimately losing, but I was surprised at the staunch defensive resources Black has at his disposal even after this weakening move.  The key seems to be playing 6...d5, freeing the Bishop for defense.

    After 7. Bxd5+ Kg6, there's no quick mates.  8.Ng2 looks powerful but White can be held at bay in a variety of ways.

     



    In the line you show here, White doesn't need an immediate mate; he's two pawns up, has the better development, can castle, play d4, get the rest of his pieces out and win in his own good time. Cool

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #27

    batgirl

    "In the line you show here, White doesn't need an immediate mate; he's two pawns up, has the better development, can castle, play d4, get the rest of his pieces out and win in his own good time."

    In every line after ...fxe (and probably after just ...f6), Black is at a serious disadvantage, both positionally and materially.  That's not even the issue.  Most lines give a forced mate.  Some lines give Black something to fight with, if not all that much. I've lost games with more advantage than that after a simple slip-up.

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #28

    Gil-Gandel

    As indeed have I. Laughing Fair enough, then. The point AFAICT is that the 2. ...f6 line leave White in the happy position of playing the White side of Damiano's Defence, but without having to sacrifice a Knight and the excellent chance of castling to take advantage of an open f-file. It seems greedy to ask for a forced mate as well.

    What Black was doing when he played this... perhaps he thought it would be a patient positional grind like the Slav Defence in the QGD. Smile


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