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An Open Question


  • 3 years ago · Quote · #1

    batgirl

    I saw a thread called An Open Letter, so I paraphased (stole) the caption for my title.  But I do have a question to throw out. 

    I'm mainly a bloggergirl.  Most of my blogs take the form of articles, but I prefer to keep them all at home where I can keep my eye on them.  However, I look in the Article section at chess.com and it's apparent that that area is extremely more heavily read than the Blog area.  So, I'm curious to know the reason(s) for the huge discrepancy (all writers yearn to be read, so I'm really interested in learning). 

    What reason(s) do you have for prefering Articles over Blogs?

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #2

    TheGrobe

    Articles tend to be featured on the main page, so instead of having to search for the content it's served up to you. Once in an article, still more articles are featured (as is the case with blogs). That initial ease of navigation makes all the difference.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #3

    batgirl

    hmm...  so it's partly a technical issue?

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #4

    mnag

    To me, articles have an appearance of authenticity, legitimacy; that the author put some effort in presenting the material faithfully researched and maybe somewhat correct. Blogs, to me, seem less so, more opinion, less research, less dependable, maybe a bit more off the cuff; only my prejudice, sorry.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #5

    batgirl

    You're certainly allowed your prejudice in this matter. I'm just looking to the reasons behind the preferences.  I understand that Articles are primarily written by chess professionals, and, as such, deal with more often the technical aspects of chess.  Does that play into your prejudice too?

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #6

    TonyH

    articles are also listed on the right side of the main page so are more easily accessible. How do I find a blog by one person on a site with thousands of members?

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #7

    batgirl

    TonyH wrote:

    articles are also listed on the right side of the main page so are more easily accessible. How do I find a blog by one person on a site with thousands of members?

    You can track that person.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #8

    Estragon

    There is usually only one featured blog post, and several different articles on the main page.  So articles will tend to catch more eyes coming in - it's really that simple.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #9

    Bubatz

    Yeah, it's really that simple - it took me a long time to accidentally stumble upon the batgirl-articles blog. I generally find the option to track persons (instead of just threads) questionable, but I do use it in this case because I don't want to miss those articles on the history of chess.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #10

    Arctor

    Blogs are generally written by nobodies with nothing interesting to say (there are exceptions of course). Articles are written by well known titled players who get compensated for doing so which gives the illusion that there is valuable, must-read information contained in them

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #11

    batgirl

    Thanks for the input so far. 
    Do you think blogs would be more popular, or at least more widely read, if marketed differently by the administration here? 

    Does the fact that blogs are generally written by nobodies preclude in everyone's mind that they will have less to communicate.... or conversely, do articles, written by somebodies, preclude in everyone'smind that they will have more to communicate? 

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #12

    Metastable

    Again, my prejudice based on a general perception of the terms: I think of a blog as a purely personal thing, with only the (possibly unknown) character of the author to back it up. An article on the other hand, has more connotation that it's associated with a reputable publication somehow and thus has more merit, or at least may hev been proof read or approved somehow.

    Marketing would certainly play into it, but when I stumble across a blog purporting to explain the nuances of an opening, and then discover it's been written by an 1100 player, it tends to tarnish the "good name" of blogging just as much as that particular blog post.

    Of course, other blogs are a delight to read , but it seems to be a very mixed bag.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #13

    philidor_position

    Maybe not a direct answer to question, but just to clarify some potential confusions, chess.com users who are on the "Top Bloggers" list (you get into the list by a choice made by staff) do get their blog posts publicized on the main page of chess.com, so users do not have to "find them within thousands of blogs."

    However, single articles stay on the home page for a given time (usually a day or a few days), while blog posts from top bloggers of chess.com are circulated for each home page view. The articles are usually written by paid authors of chess.com, they carry official titles such as IM or GM and specifically focus on training: analysis, strategy lessons, openings, etc. 

    I don't know the precise periods, but, let's say, the circulation period is one week. In that case, if batgirl or I write a blog, it gets circulated on the home page among others for a week. If someone who is not on the top bloggers list post a blog, it doesn't appear on the homepage, but appears on the blog section only.

    It's a little unfortunate that I as a top blogger get the same time on the homepage as batgirl when we post. I mean, she has enough material just to have a chess history website dedicated to herself and shares amazingly rich stuff, and clearly a lot of work goes into her posts, while I just rely on my patzer experiences etc. But this problem could be partly remedied by the amount of trackers she gets.

    By the way, I don't think this is only about the time a blog post appears on the homepage compared to an article does. Probably a lot of users follow articles more because they come from professional chess authors who have titles and give chess lessons. Batgirl's blog is good enough to be professional for sure, but other blog authors are, as far as I could tell, just amateurs who like to have fun and share experiences.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #14

    batgirl

    The top blogging thing had been improved other it's previous incarnations and is probably as finely and fairly tuned as possible.  When I first log on to chess.com, I immediately read all the new blogs post titles and then the ones that interest me, or those by the bloggers who I've come to enjoy. I may or may not peruse the articles since they tend to be heavier, and even if I do, since they are heavier reading, I'm even more selective which ones to which I want to devote the time it takes to read.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #15

    gretagarbo

    Only if you are logged in will you see any feature blog page on the main chess.com page. Quite often I go to chess.com without logging in to read articles and blogs. I noticed when chess.com changed the main page, the blog section totally disappeared . It took me some time to locate it as it was buried in some tabs. I would think that I am not alone in visited the main page without logging in. So I believe the even the featured blogs are not viewed as often as they once were.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #16

    batgirl

    Hey! I missed you.

    I never log out, so when I open chess.com, I go automatically to my homepage. I never go to the splash page except on purpose, and even then I'm logged in. Thanks for the insight.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #17

    gretagarbo

    I've been around even though I haven't posted any comments. I still read your blog on a regular basis. You have one of the more interesting blogs on this site. You have quite a talent for writing.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #18

    batgirl

    Well, honestly, it's contributions such as yours that make my efforts interesting.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #19

    mnag

    batgirl wrote:

    You're certainly allowed your prejudice in this matter. I'm just looking to the reasons behind the preferences.  I understand that Articles are primarily written by chess professionals, and, as such, deal with more often the technical aspects of chess.  Does that play into your prejudice too?

    Since I am basically interested in the technical aspects written by both talented amateurs and professionals, yes. However, I do read historical articles by historians and nonhistorians with interest.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #20

    NimzoRoy

    So, anyone here can write an article? I didn't know that, I just ASSumed most of us were limited to writing blogs.


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