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Anand v. Topalov 2010


  • 5 years ago · Quote · #1

    sclukey

    So, I have been dying to know what the chess community thinks about the upcoming World Chess Championship match between these two great GMs. I personally believe that Topalov may have a slight advantage, and he is (in my humble opinion) likely to become the champion after this match.

    I would like to know who you think will win and why.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #2

    maulmorphy

    I think Vishy is going to retain his title. last time against Kramnik he was spot on.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #3

    Cutebold

    I hope that Vishy wins, because I'm a big fan of his. What I know, however, is that it will be hard fought. We haven't seen Topalov at major tournaments in awhile despite his huge rating, which means he's certainly preparing in depth for his chance at claiming the title.I support Vishy's experience and practice.

    Go Vishy!

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #4

    ReedRichards

    I believe Anand will win...in the current Corus Chess Tournament, he is the only one who has not lost a game....says something of his form playing the likes of Carlsen, Shirof, and defeating Kramnik easily today....while still holding back special variations for the match with Topalov.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #5

    hoard88

    I'm putting my bets on Anand.  His style of play should prove more solid than Topalov's "gambling problem," as Chess Life magazine once called it. Topalov has a knack (as can be seen in his semi-final match with Kamsky) for pushing the odds with his games and almost never playing for a draw when the game could push him closer to the "big picture" goal of his, in this case the World Chess Championship.  I believe that if Anand sticks with his Karpov-like style of play, he should be able to take advantage of Topalov's... recklessness(?) and defend against the complex tactics he'll face.  Then again, Topalov's intense fighting spirit could overwhelm Anand, if Anand can't keep his cool.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #6

    aadaam

    I don't mind who wins, I'm just gagging for it.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #7

    jlueke

    It should be a rather interesting match and hopefully it will generate some interesting games.  As Topalov loves complexity we shouldn't get too bored following the match.  Anand seems to play extremely solid chess, not too many great risks, just expanding within the position versus Toplaov's more agressive demeanor. 

    All in all I am actually more excited about seeing the qualifying for the next WCC. 

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #9

    Shivsky

    Just curious ... we've seen Topalov blow away the competition in multi-player tourneys, but how is his history of tearing apart anyone at head-to-head match play?  I've seen quite the opposite in the Kramnik match and just wondering if I missed anyone besides Kamsky?   

    Not trying to stir the pot, just wanted to compare the two players in terms of match playing experience.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #10

    jlueke

    Wow, Kramnik is no fan of Toplaov and his team.  I suppose that's understandable.  He seems to be all but predicting that they will use underhanded tactics in Sofia.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #12

    orangehonda

    Shivsky wrote:

    Just curious ... we've seen Topalov blow away the competition in multi-player tourneys, but how is his history of tearing apart anyone at head-to-head match play?  I've seen quite the opposite in the Kramnik match and just wondering if I missed anyone besides Kamsky?   

    Not trying to stir the pot, just wanted to compare the two players in terms of match playing experience.


    I don't know, but that's a good question.  Anand's preparation against Kramnik was excellent of course, but like Kramnik said after losing, hard work isn't enough (he said he worked extremely hard on his own preparation), you have to prepare correctly and use your time efficiently.  So even if Topalov work very hard in preparation, it doesn't necessarily mean he will be better in match play.

    In terms of level of play, Topalov didn't seem to blow away Kamsky, it seemed pretty close.  Kamsky is a very strong player of course, but I think Anand is on another level.  It will be interesting to see how effective Topalov's preparation is.

    Interesting interview with Kramnik.  If Topolov really hated Kramnik, then he'd make this match with Anand go as smooth as possible Smile well, at least I hope this WC match is only about chess, and not antics off the board.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #13

    eXecute

    I think Topalov may win, simply because of his preparation (as it is his only chance, so he will be pressured to work extra hard), and Anand doesn't feel the pressure, except for losing the title, but he may be overconfident by now, he may take more risks simply because he's already WCC.

    I don't know how much rating has to do with it, but Topalov has a pretty high rating, perhaps it means he can face off against the best GMs and come out ahead in high-pressure rated and timed matches.

    Anand may win as well, his form is strong. He has done it before, so maybe he'll be more relaxed, while Topalov may be nervous.

    On the other hand, Topalov is much younger, he may learn more variations and can study anand's hundreds of past games. While Anand may have less games of Topalov's to study.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #14

    orangehonda

    For players who both will open with either e4 or d4 I wonder what kind of immense preparation Anand and Topalov are doing?

    Chess life had an article about some of Anand's prep against Kramnik.  Basically how these guys who were helping him would sometimes stay up all night coming up with relevant study positions, opening prep, novelties, etc and Anand would eat breakfast, go work out, then for 10 hours or something have these guys feed him all that stuff.  At the end of the day he'd go to sleep and his team may be up another 5 hours preparing more for tomarrow... pretty nuts.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #15

    BacteriaInfection

    I'm rooting for Topalov.  Anand has been the most undeserving and boring Champion in the history of chess.  No charisma, no personality.  Completely dull and one-dimensional.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #16

    Estragon

    Natalia_Pogonina wrote:

    Here's Kramnik's take on this: http://blip.tv/play/hIkMgc%2BjOQI


     

    Nice vid, and I agree with Kramnik's take on the match (which I'm sure will be a great relief to Vlad!).  I would add only that the reason Anand agreed to play in Sofia seemed to me to be financial.  The government-backed bid was far higher than the others - if I recall correctly, it was nearly double the second highest bid.

    Since Kasparov, and with a worldwide economic slowdown, it has been difficult to raise big money even for WC matches.  Even the drama and controversy of Kramnik-Topalov didn't have "legs" in the non-chess world, and without outside interest there won't be huge prize funds.  That may change when Carlsen challenges, he has a very broad appeal.

     

    I think Anand is one of the strongest all-around players ever, and has become a very difficult fellow to defeat.  If the match were the "traditional" 24 games (which apparently just costs too much in the modern world), he would be a strong favorite.  Topalov, though, is so sharp tactically he can create opportunities where none are apparent, even taking great risks, so one cannot bet against him in a short match.

    A strong edge goes to the first player to win a game in a short match.  The psychological pressure on the player down a point makes it tougher to come back.  So it is a toss-up, and should be an exciting match to watch.

    Kramnik says it would be better for chess if Anand wins, which reminds me of the report from the Tal Memorial in Moscow.  The reporter noted the only top player not present was Topalov, and asked Morozevich if he missed him.  "No," came the reply, "I never miss him."

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #17

    BW-SugarDom

    Topalov will win because the match is being held in home turf.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #19

    Ziryab

    BacteriaInfection wrote:

    I'm rooting for Topalov.  Anand has been the most undeserving and boring Champion in the history of chess.  No charisma, no personality.  Completely dull and one-dimensional.


    You prefer boorish (Topalov) over good manners (Anand)? You discount that no champion ever worked longer and harder to reach the top than Anand? I cannot even imagine the observations you have made to reach this conclusion. Your view is contrary to everything that I have seen of Anand.


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