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Best Chess Software for Casual Players


  • 3 years ago · Quote · #1

    newbchessplayer

    Hello,

    I know there's another thread about what the best chess software is but it's gotten quite old and neglected.

     

    Straight to the question: What's the best chess software for teaching casual players? 

     

    On the old thread there was mention of various versions of Chessmaster and Fritz but Chessmaster is now very old and Fritz seems to be more geared toward very serious players.

     

    Please let me know. 

    Thanks!

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #2

    red_hot_pawn

    I like lucas chess. free allrounder tool . worthy  many bucks

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #3

    NimzoRoy

    http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1/188-8073723-8817252?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=chessmaster&x=0&y=0

    http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Dsoftware&field-keywords=fritz&x=0&y=0

    Find the latest version of Fritz or ChessMaster you can for under $10 and buy it. Don't worry about CM being "very old" because the universe will be "very old" before you're able to consistently beat it - or I'm able to, just so you know this isn't intended as a personal slight. Both programs come with tutorials and lessons, you should probably read some user reviews to decide which one to buy.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #4

    newbchessplayer

    I guess at this point I'm torn between 2 options:

     

    1) Get Chessmaster Grandmaster Edition Download for $20: http://www.amazon.com/Chessmaster-Grandmaster-Linux/dp/B000SL4ANE

    2)Get fritz 12 + an older version of Chessmaster for around 20 bucks total/

     

    I didn't put Fritz 13 as one of the options because I don't want to pay ~$40 for 2 insignificant feature upgrades.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #5

    sapientdust

    I'd get Chessmaster first. There's a lot of good content there for $20, and you'll get much more from it if you go through all the content carefully than from Fritz, which doesn't have much instructional value.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #6

    Estragon

    You can adjust most engines to be weak enough to beat if that's what you want, and there are many free ones you will never beat if that's what you want.

     

    If you would rather learn the game and improve your play, get a database program like Chessbase - older versions are great, most work fine - that allows you to filter games by position and opening and player, etc.  Keep it up to date with historical databases and the free TWIC weekly updates of all master events. 

    Then learn by playing over the games of strong players, especially in the opening you want to learn, and go over them fairly quickly (10-20 minutes per game).  Play through the games your side or your player wins, loses and draws and play them all out to the end, just don't spend too much time on one (you can flag the best and come back later for deep analysis).  You will begin to recognize recurring patterns and ideas from the opening through typical middlegames and even into the endings which arise. 

    Better than any book, I promise.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #7

    TonyH

    Pick up a copy of chessmaster it is a great playing program for learning players (the levels are much better for newer players, play a setting and if you win 2x in a row bump it up 1) play LOTs of games hundreds if possible. 

    Pick up a copy of chessbase 8 or higher it will do everything you need. Go over games, lots and LOTS of games, there are tons of databases for free around. 

    SCID is another database one thats free but hmm well it works i guess.

    The newer versions of fritz are good but their handicap settings are still not as refined IMO as chessmaster . review review and review your games for basic mistakes, if yo umiss a 5 move tactic thats ok just dont do 1-2 move mistakes for now.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #8

    Ziryab

    It depends on what you want to do with the software.

    Chessmaster comes with more teaching modules.

    Despite a plethora of "personalities", Fritz does a vastly better job of mimicing weak human players. Hiarcs, which is available in the Fritz interface, is the best engine for mimicing human-like play.

    If you want to use the software for analysis, then you must read this careful comparison: http://chessskill.blogspot.com/2009/12/chessmaster-versus-fritz-analysis.html

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #9

    newbchessplayer

    TonyH wrote:

    Pick up a copy of chessmaster it is a great playing program for learning players (the levels are much better for newer players, play a setting and if you win 2x in a row bump it up 1) play LOTs of games hundreds if possible. 

    Pick up a copy of chessbase 8 or higher it will do everything you need. Go over games, lots and LOTS of games, there are tons of databases for free around. 

    SCID is another database one thats free but hmm well it works i guess.

    The newer versions of fritz are good but their handicap settings are still not as refined IMO as chessmaster . review review and review your games for basic mistakes, if yo umiss a 5 move tactic thats ok just dont do 1-2 move mistakes for now.


    Thanks for the post.

    I can't seem to find chessbase 8 anywhere, and chessbase 9 is at least $70. 

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #10

    TonyH

    CM is a better learning tool. while all the other more serious software is best at analysis... Rybka is probably top at human type play but I only use computers to find tatical errors.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #11

    TheHighCommander

    Regarding newbchessplayer;

    I too am looking for a good chess training software.  My rating is around 1350. I have read through everyone's replies, and from what I can see it appears ChessMaster Grand Edition is very good ? I would like to get something that reviews my move(s) and suggests a better move or shows the error of the move I am made.  Is that asking too much or is there software available that accomplishes this?  Interactive software seems much more appealing than reading a boring book. . . for me reading a chess book is akin to watching paint dry. I am absolutely looking for feedback and responses.  I sure appreciate anyones's thoughts.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #12

    sirrichardburton

    What's wrong with the anaylsis they have by computer here? I review some of my losses that way and pay paticular note to the blunders.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #13

    Ziryab

    For postgame analysis, any engine can point out your tactical blunders. Chessmaster is cheap. You might look into Arena and the vast array of free engines.

    I use Fritz and family (the Fritz GUI) with such engines as Fritz, Hiarcs, Stockfish, and Rybka.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #14

    MSteen

    Chessmaster is simply a lot more FUN. In addition to all it's instructional value, it's the kind of program you want to keep coming back to in order to beat the next "personality" above you.

    Fritz, by contrast, is brilliant, but kind of intimidating--even with the stupid voice activated. It's kind of like a German stand-up comic--you know you're supposed to be entertained, but all you can think about is sitting up straight in your chair.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #15

    Ziryab

    "Wheee! The rabbit's free. All the way to the other side!"

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #16

    TheHighCommander

    A sure appreciate the comments -

     I've looked at ChessMaster and see many good reviews - but I also see several comments that people have had problems it will not function on Windows 7; other comments from people say it works on Win. 7 just fine. Any thoughts on that?

    I would like to try CM, but don't want to get burned putting out $125.00 and it not function on Windows 7. . . . .

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #17

    EscherehcsE

    TheHighCommander wrote:

    A sure appreciate the comments -

     I've looked at ChessMaster and see many good reviews - but I also see several comments that people have had problems it will not function on Windows 7; other comments from people say it works on Win. 7 just fine. Any thoughts on that?

    I would like to try CM, but don't want to get burned putting out $125.00 and it not function on Windows 7. . . . .

    I have CM 10th Edition; I don't have the newest CM11 (Grandmaster Edition). CM11 is now hard to find, people are asking outrageous prices, as I guess you've discovered. CM11 has some extra tutorial material that CM10 doesn't have (the art of learning tutorial?). But CM10 still has a lot of tutorial material. I've also heard stories of people not being able to install CM11 on Windows 7, but I'm not a data point on that issue.

    While CM10 isn't guaranteed to work on Windows 7, I can tell you that it installed OK for me on Windows 7. You'd need to install the three patches from the Ubisoft forum to correct for all the bugs and to have CM10 run without the CD needing to be installed in the drive.

    I wouldn't pay $125 for CM11, or even half of that. You should be able to find CM10 for $20 or less, under $10 if you shop around. Try Amazon, eBay, OfficeMax, Office Depot, or Half Price Books.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #18

    ticcherr

    in terms of sugestin best moves u can jus switch on da engin for dat rite? imo da simpelest gui is tarrasch nd u can put hoodini on it but its not a grate trainin thing or anythin jus if u wana analyse games nd play vs comp nd use a mini database etc it gud

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #19

    Bronco70

    You can get chessmaster 10 for $10 at office max. Has a ton of training modules. Great levels (character) and you can run analysis on your games against them

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #20

    Ziryab

    $50 is too much to pay for Chessmaster. It is great software at $20, but for $50 there are too many better choices.


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