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best traps to learn for 1300 / 1400 type players


  • 21 months ago · Quote · #1

    mjk71

    I'm curious whether people have suggestions for useful traps for players at around a 1300 - 1400 level to know.  Meaning other than the most obvious (scholar's mate, fried liver, etc.), but (a) nevertheless "broad" enough to cover scenarios such players will see (i.e., not specific to particular openings -- more commonly employable), and (b) not terribly complex to pull off tactically.

    In other words, good traps for someone at this level to try to spring on opponents of similar level.  Thanks....

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #2

    Ziryab

    I know a couple of 1300 players who spend a lot of time studying traps. One of them has scored several notable upsets with these traps. However, IMHO, he remains at 1300 while his peers are 1600 to high-1900s because he continues to study traps while others have strengthened their tactics and learned to pursue the truth of the position.

    My advice: forget about traps. It's the wrong way to improve your game.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #3

    mjk71

    I fully agree that learning "magic sequences" isn't going to improve my overall game -- but what I'm looking for (in addition to doing other stuff to improve my game) are traps that can help me WIN games.  It makes sense that everything other than the most obvious "traps" / similar tactics (scholar's mate / fried liver) would be limited to use against specific openings / defenses.  In which case, indeed, it probably isn't worth my time to memorize them.  But if there are "trap-like tactics" that can be learned and then applied in many game situations (e.g., where a common position is reached, or perhaps as an opening), then the time investment would certainly be worth it to me (since my goal isn't just to improve my game but to win).  Anyway, thanks for the suggestions.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #4

    Ziryab

    Study tactics. Learn to punish positional errors. All traps grow from these.

    Preparing traps against players who deviate from book on move three or four (most 1300 players) takes more time than it is worth. Traps are more likely to work against stronger players who are playing rote. At 1300, there is no rote. 

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #5

    Shivsky

    Ditto on whatever Ziryab said.  Though it does help to pay attention to how to punish people trying to play cheapos on you or atleast not fall for them! :)

    This starts with simple Bc4+Qh5 mate-the-bastard attacks and can go up in complexity to dealing with the Lolli/Liver in a correct manner.  

    In terms of practical chances with G/30 type of time controls on the clock in most weekend OTBs (which are infested with kids who do play these cheapos a LOT at the sub-1400 level), it doesn't hurt to know how to punish (or play accurately) these situations "beforehand" rather than work it out on the board while burning your clock.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #6

    EricFleet

    +1 to Ziryab.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #7

    Ziryab

    While walking my puppies, I thought about my remarks. It occurred to me that the first chess book that I read was chock full of traps. That's not how I usually remember it, but it is true. That book was Irving Chernev, The 1000 Best Short Games of Chess. I wrote a little essay about it last year: http://chessskill.blogspot.com/2012/03/my-first-chess-book.html

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #8

    Seraphimity

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 21 months ago · Quote · #9

    mattyf9

    Studying chess traps will not make you better. They're useful to know so you don't fall for them yourselves, but they will not help you improve. I wouldn't waste my time studying traps extensively. I would study the opening you like to play and be aware of the traps that can arise in the opening you play. Learning traps in many different openings cannot be very beneficial.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #10

    learningthemoves

    I agree with Ziryab and the other posters who have posted solid advice.

    They have given you what you "need". 

    But so you can get a little of what you "want" too, lol, check out 'the fishing pole trap'. 

    That may be an example of a versatile little "cheapo" as they call it that is tactical and can be applied in positions arising from many different openings.

    Not a "trap" per se, but also check out the classical "greek gift". 

    In my opinion, someone at the 1300-1400 level can definitely benefit from at least being aware of these two.

    I'm not sure if those are the kinds of tactical traps you were looking for or not, but hope it helps.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #11

    mjk71

    Thanks very much for the helpful guidance.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #12

    learningthemoves

    mjk71 wrote:

    Thanks very much for the helpful guidance.

    Sure thing. I just played a game and used both of the "traps"/"tactics" we were discussing in the same game for an easy 17 move miniature win so you can see 'em in action.

    When it came down to mate in 1, my opponent resigned.

    But I figured you may like to see an example of what I was talking about in action so here's the game for you to see how you can use these tactics as part of your plan and play them positionally for easy wins against the unprepared opponent at our levels.

    Now, I make no claims to have played the best moves and I know there's plenty of room for improvement with my game, (that's what makes it fun!) but if it helps to spark some "ideas" for what's possible for someone at around our rating level, then I will consider it a good idea to share.

    But by all means, take the advice of players rated higher than me over  any ideas I suggest if they advise anything to be unsound and keep us posted on your progress with your tactics training. :)

    Enjoy!

     



  • 21 months ago · Quote · #13

    EricFleet

    learningthemoves wrote:
    mjk71 wrote:

    Thanks very much for the helpful guidance.

    Sure thing. I just played a game and used both of the "traps"/"tactics" we were discussing in the same game for an easy 17 move miniature win so you can see 'em in action.

    When it came down to mate in 1, my opponent resigned.

    But I figured you may like to see an example of what I was talking about in action so here's the game for you to see how you can use these tactics as part of your plan and play them positionally for easy wins against the unprepared opponent at our levels.

    Now, I make no claims to have played the best moves and I know there's plenty of room for improvement with my game, (that's what makes it fun!) but if it helps to spark some "ideas" for what's possible for someone at around our rating level, then I will consider it a good idea to share.

    But by all means, take the advice of players rated higher than me over  any ideas I suggest if they advise anything to be unsound and keep us posted on your progress with your tactics training. :)

    Enjoy!

     

    This is a good example where one side is familiar with a common mating pattern and the other side doesn't understand the defense. So, I am not sure this is a "trap" by any stretch, but an example of understanding common motifs in chess.

    As an aside, I slapped my head when Black did not play 15. ... Bf5. At that point, White is left without any type of an attack.

     

    Good job with the attack, but next time I'd advise taking the free Knight and winning in the end game :)

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #14

    mattyf9

    This isn't a trap, your opponent simply blundered.

    learningthemoves wrote:

    mjk71 wrote:

    Thanks very much for the helpful guidance.

    Sure thing. I just played a game and used both of the "traps"/"tactics" we were discussing in the same game for an easy 17 move miniature win so you can see 'em in action.

    When it came down to mate in 1, my opponent resigned.

    But I figured you may like to see an example of what I was talking about in action so here's the game for you to see how you can use these tactics as part of your plan and play them positionally for easy wins against the unprepared opponent at our levels.

    Now, I make no claims to have played the best moves and I know there's plenty of room for improvement with my game, (that's what makes it fun!) but if it helps to spark some "ideas" for what's possible for someone at around our rating level, then I will consider it a good idea to share.

    But by all means, take the advice of players rated higher than me over  any ideas I suggest if they advise anything to be unsound and keep us posted on your progress with your tactics training. :)

    Enjoy!

     

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #15

    TetsuoShima

    well just learn tactics then youll see it yourself and need no traps.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #16

    naturalproduct

    Ziryab wrote:

    Study tactics. Learn to punish positional errors. All traps grow from these.

    Preparing traps against players who deviate from book on move three or four (most 1300 players) takes more time than it is worth. Traps are more likely to work against stronger players who are playing rote. At 1300, there is no rote. 

    +1

    I fell into traps a couple times, losing a game in 10 moves or less. It was because I didn't know how to punish my opponent. When I think back, the it was dangerous for him because he sacrificed position or left pieces hanging in the p[rocess. I just didn't know how to respond...shock and awe effect I guess.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #17

    naturalproduct

    learningthemoves:

    Excellent example! This is almost exactly like what happened to me as I described above....lol...ironic. And yes, it was a blunder, but aren't most responses to successful traps blunders??


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