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Bobby Fischer---Aspergers syndrome


  • 21 months ago · Quote · #1

    jumpmeifucan

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 21 months ago · Quote · #2

    Stinetuck

    Just take the genius, the rest is all window dressing anyway =P

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #3

    jumpmeifucan

    His  brain is one in a Billion. Should we have compassion?

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #4

    erikzambrano

    I am not familiar with Aspergers syndrome, but Bobby Fischer was the considered to be the strongest player during his time. It does not excuse his behavioral patterns or why he made the kinds of personal demands that he made, but to some degree, I can see why he did. Chess is not the most exciting game to watch for most people and neither is it supposed to be. It is a game of mental calculation and accuracy in one's ability to strategize and tactically outthink another person in order to win. Bobby Fischer was just another human being on this planet likeany other person. What made him unique was his ability to play the game like no other during his time period as a professional chess player. He is either liked or disliked as a person by others whether they play the game or not. However, he made a name for himself in the area of chess and deserves the respect of all people who play the game. Whether he is loved or hated in the chess community is irrelevant. All should respect him for the way he played the game in his own individualized style and ability.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #5

    erikzambrano

    was considered to be*

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #6

    stopandthink

    Did he hurt your feelings? if so ask yourself if you could ever forgive him...

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #7

    DrCheckevertim

    erikzambrano wrote:

    I am not familiar with Aspergers syndrome, but Bobby Fischer was the considered to be the strongest player during his time. It does not excuse his behavioral patterns or why he made the kinds of personal demands that he made, but to some degree, I can see why he did. Chess is not the most exciting game to watch for most people and neither is it supposed to be. It is a game of mental calculation and accuracy in one's ability to strategize and tactically outthink another person in order to win. Bobby Fischer was just another human being on this planet likeany other person. What made him unique was his ability to play the game like no other during his time period as a professional chess player. He is either liked or disliked as a person by others whether they play the game or not. However, he made a name for himself in the area of chess and deserves the respect of all people who play the game. Whether he is loved or hated in the chess community is irrelevant. All should respect him for the way he played the game in his own individualized style and ability.

    I agree. It doesn't excuse his later actions of hatred and paranoia, nor should we look up to those actions. But, of course he deserves ultimate respect as a chess player.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #8

    polydiatonic

    Hi started a thread a couple of years ago about Fischer, basically asking if he was suffering from mental health issues or was he just an tempremental jerk.  I think the "forgiveness" issue is up because many people, myself included, wrestle with the idea of admiring his play but abhoring his behavior.  

    He is not the only "giant" who is such a double edged sword in their discipline.  Look at the composer Richard Wagner who was perhaps the greatest composer of his generation but was also an antisemite and a bit of a grifter.  Or Henry Ford, the father of industry but another antisemite.  There many others who were incredible at their talent but who had terrible charcter or personality flaws.  Fischer just happens to be the one who we "revere" because his life revolved around our hobby.  So we wrestle with our own "love/hate" feelings about him.  Just my opinion.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #9

    blueemu

    paulgottlieb wrote:

    Fischer was a great player, one of a handful of supreme geniuses, who left behind a wonderful legacy of games for future generations to enjoy and learn from. In a few more years, that will be what people remember him for.

    True. How many people now care... or even know... what a bastard Steinitz was?

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #10

    Antlitz

    polydiatonic wrote:

    Hi started a thread a couple of years ago about Fischer, basically asking if he was suffering from mental health issues or was he just an tempremental jerk.  I think the "forgiveness" issue is up because many people, myself included, wrestle with the idea of admiring his play but abhoring his behavior.  

    He is not the only "giant" who is such a double edged sword in their discipline.  Look at the composer Richard Wagner who was perhaps the greatest composer of his generation but was also an antisemite and a bit of a grifter.  Or Henry Ford, the father of industry but another antisemite.  There many others who were incredible at their talent but who had terrible charcter or personality flaws.  Fischer just happens to be the one who we "revere" because his life revolved around our hobby.  So we wrestle with our own "love/hate" feelings about him.  Just my opinion.

    I have a few patients of moderate MR to profound.  Some days they just look at me and hit or hate me, saying random crap.  The next shift, I'm the best sweetheart they've ever had.  Some of which are autistic...one particularly can learn a classical music piano (piano concerto 21, Mozart andante) in one listen by ear.  So genius/"MR" in the same consideration...

     

    Social normalcy is relative

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #11

    Estragon

    Fischer was more of an "idiot savant" than a genius.  He played chess brilliantly and was virtually dysfunctional in every other aspect.

    Incidentally, those who claim to know his IQ are at least in error, or outright lying.  During the time he would have been tested, those results would have been very confidential.  The child himself would not be told, only his parent in conference.  The testing agency or school district would never issue any report in writing, so anything anyone claims about someone's IQ is either hearsay from a parent, which may or may not be true, or simply invented out of whole cloth.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #12

    waffllemaster

    paulgottlieb wrote:

    Estrangement, I believe you are incorrect. the Soviet propaganda machine did their best to sell the idea of Fischer as an unstable idiot savant. In fact, they did such a good job that they ended up fatally underestimating him. There's a fascinating book called "Russians Versus Fischer" that contains a lot of data on the topic, including the minutes of many of their meetings. In there inquest after the Taimanov disaster, Kotov is quoted as saying "Fischer plays tennis! He's coordinated. He speaks four languages." He was so sure that they would be meeting a neurotic, uncultured boor.

    I think Fischer did a fine job all by himself proving how dysfunctional outside of chess he was.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #13

    jumpmeifucan

    I belive it.---why did the U.S  play him bad. Yes he broke the law by playing chess--Does anyone see whats wrong with that.So serbia invited him to play .---He maybe needed money. Anyway dont put me in jail for playing chess.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #14

    AdamRinkleff

    Fischer was wronged by the US and the USCF. He was persecuted for his political beliefs, namely his belief that the Palestinian people are the victims of Israeli crimes against humanity.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #15

    Estragon

    AdamRinkleff wrote:

    Fischer was wronged by the US and the USCF. He was persecuted for his political beliefs, namely his belief that the Palestinian people are the victims of Israeli crimes against humanity.

    Baloney.  He violated the law against doing business with Serbia and evaded taxes on his earnings.

    I personally think the embargo was poor policy (as in nearly all cases) but it was the law.  Fischer was not exempt, and chess was not exempt.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #16

    AdamRinkleff

    Estragon wrote:

    it was the law. 

    Bad laws should not be followed. Playing chess in Serbia was not a crime.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #17

    dadam

    Is a idiot a good human only because he is a brilliant chess player?

    He is still a idiot (but a brilliant player).

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #18

    polydiatonic

    "Fischer was more of an "idiot savant" than a genius.  He played chess brilliantly and was virtually dysfunctional in every other aspect."


    Completely wrong.  An "idiot savant" is typified by having super advanced abilities that come without any apparent preperation or other advanced aptitude.  Fischer overiding character as a chess player was incredible PREPARATION.  That is in fact the OPPOSITE of what a "savant" is.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #19

    polydiatonic

    AdamRinkleff wrote:

    Fischer was wronged by the US and the USCF. He was persecuted for his political beliefs, namely his belief that the Palestinian people are the victims of Israeli crimes against humanity.

    Another completely wacky comment.  Fischer's anti semitism had very little to do with the world outside of chess.  I have read and seen just about every interview that Fischer has ever done and I never, not once heard him say a word about the Palestian/Israeli conflict until he was in his 60's.

    His antisemitism predates that by at least 30 years...


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