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Calculation/Blindfold play


  • 3 years ago · Quote · #41

    mashi_

    To calculate in blindfold chess, use algebra..

    1. e4   (

     using the coordinate graphing system is

    (5,2) to (5,4).. using slope you can represent what pieces are which.. or if piece are in contact with your pieces or something even deeper.. (4 - 2 ) / (5 - 5) giving this a slope of 2 ... If black follows with E5 his slope would be -2. Since pawns capture diagnally their capture slope would be +1/-1 or -1/+1 which is equals 0...

    1. Nf3

    (7,1) to (6,3) (3-1)/(6-7) = 2/-1 == -2

    while a knight "facing" the other way would have a slope of -2 etc..

    you would have to play like that i suppose. :)

    EDIT:

    A B C D E F G represent 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 on the x axis

    1. E4 (5,4) E5  (5,5)

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #42

    2strong4u

    That is a pretty cool way of looking at blinfold chess slunk. I like your idea. :D

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #44

    Twobit

    Koltanowksi had a record of 34 simultaneous and 56 consecutive blindfold chess games, but he could never explain how he achieved this. (He said, he just KNEW where the pieces were...)He was never a world championship contender. Alekhine was good at blindfold chess and he became a champion. Tal was excellent at calculating, but he was not mentioned as a blindfold magician.

    The two may be loosely related, but you do not have to know what the farthest pawn is doing when calculating tactics. A photographic memory does not make you a genius. Finally, does anybody know a blind grandmaster (one who was born blind)?

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidfarrant/3243667274/

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #45

    Twobit

    I remember reading that in the USSR there was indeed a concern that blindfold chess may be "brain damaging". They felt that such an intense thinking utilizing a particular part of the brain may somehow overstrain the part resulting in damage. Some players, Capablanca comes into mind here, died of stroke in the middle of a game (he played against 5 once, blindfolded). There was a number of famous players who succumbed to mental illness, like Rubinstein (played blindfolded against one). There is Morphy, who died of stroke, had possibly mental illness and played blindfolded against 5. Then there is the classic story of Stefan Zweig ("The Royal Game"), showing that once one is internalizing too much, this may unhinge him from reality. I still believe that blindfold may improve your board awareness, but does not improve significantly the calculating abilities.
  • 3 years ago · Quote · #46

    Estragon

    Twobit wrote:
    I remember reading that in the USSR there was indeed a concern that blindfold chess may be "brain damaging". They felt that such an intense thinking utilizing a particular part of the brain may somehow overstrain the part resulting in damage. Some players, Capablanca comes into mind here, died of stroke in the middle of a game (he played against 5 once, blindfolded). There was a number of famous players who succumbed to mental illness, like Rubinstein (played blindfolded against one). There is Morphy, who died of stroke, had possibly mental illness and played blindfolded against 5. Then there is the classic story of Stefan Zweig ("The Royal Game"), showing that once one is internalizing too much, this may unhinge him from reality. I still believe that blindfold may improve your board awareness, but does not improve significantly the calculating abilities.

     

    It's true the Soviets discouraged blindfold play, and there is little of it in Soviet praxis, which explains why Tal was not known for it.

     

    But Capablanca wasn't playing when he had his stroke.  He had just arrived at the  old Manhattan Chess Club when he became confused and was unable to take off his overcoat.  He collapsed on the floor there, and died in the hospital a few hours later.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #47

    The_Storm1

    Lolz wow man a lot of ppl left comments for you...

    well... I love this topic I have a book talking about it in one chapter of it...

    as a matter of fact I have a lot of books of chess... but this topic in particularly I like it very much...

    good jop

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #48

    Nerves

    Interesting... There was a time when I was younger that I can move and counter opponent's pieces in my mind without a board. I can progress up to 15 moves on both sides but no one to play blindfold with. My uncles used to play it while traveling in the car, and even then, I tried imagining the pieces with them. I really wish now I was trained then when my visualization was more vivid. Age, as they say, decline without practice. Glad to have found this site. Learned this game by myself at 6 just from watching but nobody wanted to play me. in my lifetime ( I'm 40 now ), I played less than 500 games I think. Haven't played in over a decade till I found chess with friends on iphone last year. Not much challenge there I get nasty words at the end of some games. Anyway, I believe, visualization can improve with practice but some are just born a natural at it. However, if not polished or used, raw talent is wasted and useless. I commend the people here for being really good with visualization. If one is good at it, playing blindfold won't be a problem. I love this topic. Thanks for posting.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #49

    windows96

    It 's based pretty much on memory and imagination

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #50

    mashi_

    With my way you literally calculate. Not so much imagine. (I already posted it)

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #51

    RyanMurphy5

    I've played against a team blindfolded and it helps me calculate I think.  My goal is to get to expert strength and currently I"m around 1500.  I like the idea of playing blindfolded and I do think it helps to "see"

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #52

    mashi_

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 21 months ago · Quote · #53

    mashi_

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 21 months ago · Quote · #54

    TornadoTee

    To my knowledge, there is no Soviet study proving that blindfold chess is bad for health.

     

    There's no reason to think that blindfold chess is bad for you. You're just visualising the board in your head. If anything, it improves your chess ability.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #55

    mashi_

    Try thinking in pluralism as opposed to monism and dualism (both).

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #56

    mashi_

    You can use the hexadecimal number system (E4 = 228). Graph with (x,y,z) and calculate slope etc.

    [quote]

    1. e4   (

     using the coordinate graphing system is

    (5,2) to (5,4).. using slope you can represent what pieces are which.. or if piece are in contact with your pieces or something even deeper.. (4 - 2 ) / (5 - 5) giving this a slope of 2 ... If black follows with E5 his slope would be -2. Since pawns capture diagnally their capture slope would be +1/-1 or -1/+1 which is equals 0...

    1. Nf3

    (7,1) to (6,3) (3-1)/(6-7) = 2/-1 == -2

    while a knight "facing" the other way would have a slope of -2 etc..

    you would have to play like that i suppose. :)

    EDIT:

    A B C D E F G represent 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 on the x axis

    1. E4 (5,4) E5  (5,5)

    [/quote]

  • 13 months ago · Quote · #57

    philidor_position

    offtherook wrote:

    For me, blindfold chess is no different from regular chess in terms of how well I play. I play at the same strength, though perhaps a little bit more slowly. This has always been the case, even when I was a much weaker 900-level player. I typically win blindfold games against any class B or A player, despite only being Class C myself. I have never lost blindfold games against anyone but a master.

    Blindfold simuls are more difficult. I seldom get a chance to practice these, but 2-3 games at a time is probably my max right now, and in this case my playing strength does drop a bit.

    I lolled at this one, cool story bro. Wink

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #58

    Kepler-62e

    'Improve your chess' by Jonathan Tistall has a chapter(12pages) called 'Blindfold chess and Stepping-stone-diagrams'. I find it very useful.

    Here is an excerpt: The stepping-stone technique consist simply of resetting the mind's eye on the position at that point at which the student feels he is beginning to lose focus. If the natural comfortable depth of a players's calculation is three moves, then when that level is approached, the student should begin to make a systematic effort to burn the characheristics of the new position into the mind's eye. One first sets down stepping stones at the natural length to one's 'stride'.


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