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Can someone please translate this for me


  • 20 months ago · Quote · #1

    jwhitesj

    U2200, U1900, U1600, U1300 SECTIONS: 7SS, Jan 18-21, 19-21 or 20-21, 40/2, SD/1, d5 (3-day option, rds. 1-2 G/75, d5, 2-day option, rds. 1-4 G/40, d5).

    I understand the stuff in black and blue, but I'm confused as to how to interpret the stuff in red.  Can somoene explain to me what all that means.

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #2

    MoonlessNight

    "d5" means 5 second delay. The 2 and 3 day option means you can play 2 of the days, or 3 of the days. Seems like a good tourney, good luck if you sign up!

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #3

    jwhitesj

    Thanks, what does 7ss and sd/1 mean?

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #4

    jwhitesj

    I think 7ss stands for 7 round swiss style, but I just want to make sure, but I have no idea what the SD/1 means

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #5

    MoonlessNight

    I too, think 7ss means 7 rounds. SD1 means after 40 moves you get an hour for the rest of of your moves

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #6

    jwhitesj

    Ok, thanks for your help nate

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #7

    ohsnapzbrah

    7ss = 7 round swiss system pairings

    SD/1 = 1 hour will be added after black's 40th move to both players' clocks. The rest of the game must be finished with the remainder of the time.

    d5 = 5-second delay before the clock starts for each players' turn.

    3-day option, rds 1-2 = You can play the tournament during just three days, but round 1 and 2 will have different time controls for their participants.

    2-day option, rds 1-4 = Same as 3 day option, except with even different time controls for the first four rounds

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #8

    Estragon

    The SD stands for "sudden death," indicating there are no further time controls after this one.

    The shorthand for details came about because tournaments used to be advertized mainly through Chess Life & Review, the official USCF publication, in the days before the internet was open to the public.  They limited the number of words in each announcement to keep sponsors from eating up space and thereby running up printing and mailing costs.

    It's the same principle as all the abbreviations you would see in newspaper classified ads for real estate - the less space used, the lower the cost.  It is of course anachronistic to use these forms on the internet, but old habits die hard and active tournament players quickly learn the code.


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