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Can Your Help Fix This Looser?


  • 21 months ago · Quote · #1

    candewbetter

    I am a mediocre player at best, but I have occasional moments. Unfortunately, I also have frequent Disatrous ones - namely I leave pieces hanging because I am concentrating on what I am trying to accomplish and fail to pay attention to what my opponent is about to do. This occurs especially when I am ahead and feeling invincible (Ha, ha). I keep trying to remind myself of this weakness, but in the heat of play I forget once again. I think I have done this three times in the past six or seven games.

    Has anyone had my problem and found a secret remedy?

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #2

    lxusr

    loser*

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #3

    MoonlessNight

    After you have decided which move you think is best, don't play it yet, instead, think "after I make this move, does my opponent have any threats, captures, or checks?" This should help some.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #4

    marrob

    Lo 1ro. es no jugar rápido, tomarse el tiempo necesario sin descuidar tu reloj. Es preferible perder por tiempo antes que por apresurado.

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #5

    learningthemoves

    nate23 wrote:

    After you have decided which move you think is best, don't play it yet, instead, think "after I make this move, does my opponent have any threats, captures, or checks?" This should help some.

    +1. That's good advice. It's what Chess Coach Dan Heisman says to do too.

    Also, ask yourself, whenever you move a piece from one square to another, what is no longer being protected that once was or what has this move changed in terms of protected pieces and squares?

    Sometimes people blunder when we have a protected piece then move something that leaves it unprotected without noticing it is no longer protected.

    Hope this helps.

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #6

    Casual_Joe

    As was said, before making your move try to figure out your opponent's best reply.  Eliminating blunders is one of the fastest and most effective ways for us amateurs to improve rapidly.

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #7

    ILBCNU

    lxusr wrote:

    loser*

    I think he means looser. A bad move can affect one's bowels.

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #8

    NimzoRoy

    At the risk of giving some really simplistic advice, are you looking at every square, every piece and every pawn on the bd before making your move? I play several casual OTB games/wk locally and I can tell from looking at my opponents faces that sometimes they don't, no matter how many times I remind them to.

    This next bit of advice is also simplistic and actually hard to follow (for me at least) but if you have to, start doing a "brute force" search of every single move your opponent can make after your contemplated move - before you move of course.

    BTW you didn't mention if you were blundering in blitz, bullet, turn-based games or some combo thereof.

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #9

    Defence4Gizchehs

    schacci wrote:
    lxusr wrote:

    loser*

    I think he means looser. A bad move can affect one's bowels.

    ... At least it did it with me Yesterday ahùahù.
    That's Why I am now on a Avenge gaffe in one of my Games. 

    I Will give you an Chess-outside-Advice and a Manipulating Advice [ I hope the the Manipulating Advice works for me as well ]

    Chess-outside-Advice: When you have don all the Calculation and stuff, your head might be thinking '' And now this is the move ''.
    After all! You have just checked everything... deeply.
    Thing is, deeply is not widely, and you can calculate and look ahead as much as you possibly can but still make the Bloopers.
    So: First look widely over the Board, going through the edges and such. Skimming or something else is the name for this if you do this with Text.
    Then, when you have calculated and looked ahead deeply, look away from the Board/Personal Computer/Laptop ( an Advice from Igor Smirnov ) for at least a few seconds. This way your mind can plausibly Refresh somewhat. Two (Grand)Masters do this all the time.

    Igor Smirnov Explain the anti-Blunder Techniques ( I know that not everything will help fo you ): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=la4VDJ3zg8M


    Do you know that feeling that when you made a move after a long think, you instantly see on the board that it was not the best move? 
    If so, try to manipulate this Brain Fact ( I am going to try to do this ).
    Fooling your brain and say '' Move Made '' so that your Brain may instantly skim the area and say '' not good move ''.

    Yesterday it happened against enjoyvip, the ashamable Blunder.
    Immidiately after making the move my Brain Skimmed the area, and saw the Queen Pin - Resignation.

    Scout the Area before you raid or put up Walls and Guard Towers.

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #10

    Kinghal

    GM Daryl Johansen used to preach a basic chess principle of "Sit on your hands" each move - a handy and fruitful discipline!

    And nice work Ixusr calling a higher rated player a loser, style, toleration and self-awareness all in one.

  • 17 months ago · Quote · #11

    Rochesterian

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 17 months ago · Quote · #12

    Rochesterian

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 17 months ago · Quote · #13

    Rochesterian

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 17 months ago · Quote · #14

    TheGrobe

    If it's loose and should be tighter use duct tape.  If it's tight and should be looser, WD40.


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