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Chess Books A Waste of Money?


  • 11 months ago · Quote · #21

    ldosdos

    I prefer videos than books.

  • 11 months ago · Quote · #22

    Ziryab

    I prefer books to videos. In the time that it takes to explain something in a video, I can read it eight times in a book.

  • 11 months ago · Quote · #23

    MrEdCollins

    There are few things in life more enjoyable than sitting down with a hot cup of coffee, a chess set, and a good chess book, and playing through and enjoying the games and annotations.

  • 11 months ago · Quote · #24

    Acoustician

    I do enjoy chess books but prefer the quicker pace and interactivity of software instruction like Chess Mentor. That said the depth of material on chess in print far exceeds chess learning software.

    I wonder if perhaps one day for computers and tablets, a universal chess book reader application might come about. On one part of the screen you read the text from the book, while on another part there is a virtual chessboard which you can play through whole games from the book by playing the moves from the notation and set up positions for analysis.

    While I enjoy books in general, I find the need to look from the book to the board to make the relevant move a little inconvenient. Having a clear view of both the text and board at the same time in relatively the same place would likely be a more convenient experience.

  • 11 months ago · Quote · #25

    strngdrvnthng

    I also prefer books to videos. My biggest criticism of videos is that those presenting tend to go much too fast and having to constantly pause and rewind destroys the continuity. Playing through positions from books I use Chessbase and my DGT board as I find it easier to understand the position from board and pieces rather than a flat screen/diagram.

  • 11 months ago · Quote · #26

    apawndown

    MrEdCollins wrote:

    There are few things in life more enjoyable than sitting down with a hot cup of coffee, a chess set, and a good chess book, and playing through and enjoying the games and annotations.

    Amen.  Even when the coffee gets cold.

  • 11 months ago · Quote · #27

    DrCheckevertim

    Acoustician wrote:

    I wonder if perhaps one day for computers and tablets, a universal chess book reader application might come about. On one part of the screen you read the text from the book, while on another part there is a virtual chessboard which you can play through whole games from the book by playing the moves from the notation and set up positions for analysis.

    While I enjoy books in general, I find the need to look from the book to the board to make the relevant move a little inconvenient. Having a clear view of both the text and board at the same time in relatively the same place would likely be a more convenient experience.

    This is what I want. This is exactly why I prefer videos & software to books. I find it very difficult to understand the flow of the game when I am constantly having to "input" the moves from the book onto the board. I can't get a continuous sense of the actual game/example, and it just takes too long for me.

     

    Whenever I have another chunk of time to dedicate to chess study, here's what I'm going to do. I have already searched (and found) all the chess games in Capablanca's "My Chess Career" and ordered them into its own Fritz database. They are exactly in the order they appear in the book. I am going to read the book, and whenever I need to make the moves, I will use the computer and click through the game. That way I can flow through the game, and also know that the moves are actually correct. Then I'll just read Capablanca's comments at the few crucial moments in the game where he made annotations. This book is also different (and more interesting to me) than most other chess books because it is simultaneously an autobiography -- not just a book loaded with dense chess variations and mere chess "examples."

  • 11 months ago · Quote · #28

    Mandy711

    Ziryab wrote:

    I prefer books to videos. In the time that it takes to explain something in a video, I can read it eight times in a book.

    I agree. Video lectures are too slow and makes me sleepy. Videos are great media for entertainment. Books are better for learning.

  • 11 months ago · Quote · #29

    Steve212000

    It's nice to have,few books,but with the internet it's not neccesary to buy hundreds of books,like us old timers did. lol

  • 11 months ago · Quote · #30

    billlearns

    Whether one prefers books or electronic means I think is largely a generational thing. But I love books for their low tech non energy wasting format. But I'll use whatever format I can find where I am.

  • 11 months ago · Quote · #31

    Talfan1

    the smell of a new copy of a chess classic takes some beating and where will chess be when the power fails if all our books are gone i can recall the immortal bobby fisher kicked up a right stink about his books going missing / stolen/lost at the moment im curled up reading my system and am in hog heaven

  • 11 months ago · Quote · #32

    hicetnunc

    ah93704559 wrote:

    If you look at any book you will basically simply see a collection of games giving specific examples of the material covered. Wouldnt it be cheaper to just study the games yourself? Are chess books a waste of money?

    Well, many games usually contain explanations (if they don't they it's true the book may have very little value). Also the organization of the information / games is worthwhile because it helps you structure your thinking/memory.

  • 11 months ago · Quote · #33

    DJAbacus

    I wasted money buying opening books when I first started. I guess I may use them more later down the line. However I have several chess books that I don't regret buying.

    This is my favourite book

    It's great for intermediate players and most of the game featured are internet games. 

  • 11 months ago · Quote · #34

    Ziryab

    DJAbacus wrote:

    I wasted money buying opening books when I first started. I guess I may use them more later down the line. However I have several chess books that I don't regret buying.

    This is my favourite book

    It's great for intermediate players and most of the game featured are internet games. 

    I have a few of Dan Heisman's books. They are all good.

  • 11 months ago · Quote · #35

    strngdrvnthng

    Ziryab wrote:
    DJAbacus wrote:

    I wasted money buying opening books when I first started. I guess I may use them more later down the line. However I have several chess books that I don't regret buying.

    This is my favourite book

    It's great for intermediate players and most of the game featured are internet games. 

    I have a few of Dan Heisman's books. They are all good.

    + 1.

  • 11 months ago · Quote · #36

    chuckfloyd2011

    At the airport while waiting for my sister's plane, I bought 3 chess books. 1. Bobby Fischer( Complete games of the American World Chess Champion).

    2. Fischer- Spassky 1992

    3. Billy Colias- Midwest master

  • 11 months ago · Quote · #37

    Bronco70

    DJAbacus wrote:

    I wasted money buying opening books when I first started. I guess I may use them more later down the line. However I have several chess books that I don't regret buying.

    This is my favourite book

    It's great for intermediate players and most of the game featured are internet games. 

    +1

    It's also available in the Forward Chess app


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