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Chess Etiquette


  • 5 years ago · Quote · #1

    10curtainj

    Ok.

    As you know, when playing against opponents in a match or tournament, ther ea certain rules and etiquettes players observe. Some of these:

    1) Allowing Black to choose which side they wants the clock as they move second.

    2) Starting the clock for White as Black, since white moves first.

    3) Touch Piece - if you touch a piece you must move it.

    Now these are the three main ones I know of, beides the common courtesies of being humble, courteous and friendly towards your opponent.

    NOW, on Friday I play a tournament - two games against two different opponents. First game was very intense and I ended up winning due to two past  pawns.

    Second game was a bit different. He got up a pawn as white and kept forcing pressure on me. He then forked my queen against my king, and I was only able to simplify to a 2 rook vs rook and queen endgame. Then it seemed inevitable - he simplified to rook vs queen and it looked lost. Neverless, I advance my A file pawn down the file for a hopeful promotion - and he played Qa1 to block.

    What happened next was very close - he had a passed pawn which I took, and since his king was trapped back rank - if he took the pawn on B2, it was mate. by castle.

    NOW, the reason why this fits into chess etiquette is because he took my pawn, but held onto his queen when he did so. He thought could just play the touch piece rule, at the time I wasn't sure if it was touch and take - so I asked a referee wbo then clarified that it was. He had committed to the move - I then checkmated him.

    A friend of mine said that I should have offered a draw and been more sportsman about it, and now I regret the choice I made.

    What was the right kind of chess etiquette that should of been displayed?

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #2

    trysts

    You both have to follow the rules. You didn't do anything wrong. Intentionally touch the piece, then you have to move it. What should you have done? That is your choice.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #3

    quixote88pianist

    Do not regret your actions. Everything you did was perfectly acceptable. You didn't try to domineer or manipulate your opponent into anything. You simply asked the arbiter to make a ruling because of something your opponent voluntarily did. The fact that he ruled in your favor in the manner he did proves that your actions were completely appropriate.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #4

    quixote88pianist

    Is there any way you can show us the game, with a move list, so we can see exactly what happened?

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #5

    10curtainj

    I'll try showing you a position

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #6

    theoreticalboy

    Victory dance?

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #7

    TheGrobe

    If the fatal blunder had occurred earlier in the game would you have offered a draw?

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #8

    PrawnEatsPrawn

    It's always touch move (unless you agree otherwise beforehand).... even when I play friendlies without a clock with (chess) friends, I don't seek or allow "take-backs", it diminishes the contest.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #9

    theoreticalboy

    Yeah really.  This is not 'nam, there are rules.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #10

    TheGrobe

    Now mark it zero.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #11

    10curtainj

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #12

    popskirk

    I agree....you did fine. From a very early age, I learned the touch rule. There have been occasions when that went against me, but I learned a valuable lesson from those times. After all, isn't that what chess is all about? Learning from our mistakes? Your opponent will have hopefully learned to be more careful about his moves in the future.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #13

    10curtainj

    it wasn't just touch - otherwise he would have juat moved his queen, it was touch AND take the pawn

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #14

    dewriat

    Chess is cold blooded and logic driven.  If the rules are flexible, what is the point of playing?  He knew the rules, made a mistake and had to eat it.  In fact, you taught him an important lesson. 

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #15

    ModernCalvin

    10curtainj

    The points you have covered, including the one in question are rules, not etiquette, meaning that obeying them in mandatory, not optional.

    1. Black gets to choose:

    A. Location of table where the game will be played, if none is assigned by the arbiter.

    B. Board, pieces, and clock to use for the game, if none are provided by arbiter.

    C. Which side of the board the clock is placed on.

    2. If you touch your piece, you must move it (if legal). If you touch an opposing piece, you must capture (if legal). If you do both, then you must follow both rules (if legal). On a side note, it is fun sometimes to touch pawns that cannot move or capture anything . . .

    3. Black starts the clock as soon as the arbiter says the round begins. Period.

    If you break these rules or allow your opponents to break these rules, then one or both of you are cheating! So as other players have said, you did the right thing.

     

    Etiquette is entirely a different matter:

    1. The higher rated player will be the first to offer draw if he or she wants one or feel the position is drawn.

    2. If you offer draw, and your opponent refuses, you let them be the next one to offer draw.

    3. Relative silence between both players during the game.

    4. You should resign in a hopeless position as a sign of respect to your opponent.

    5. You greet your opponent, and shake hands before and/or after the game.

    6. You don't taunt your opponent or mock him or her for blundering or making a mistake.

    These things are optional, but usually followed by experienced chess players.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #16

    Archaic71

    theoreticalboy wrote:

    Yeah really.  This is not 'nam, there are rules.


     Post of the week! lol

    In the end you did as the TD advised, which is always the way to go.  Congrats on a hard fought win.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #17

    thejackbauer

    Never knew about this touch rule... When I did play over the board, me and my friends would always pick up the pieces and even move them around at times, and then move them back. 

    What is the reason for this touch rule? I sort of like holding onto my pieces. It doesn't really seem to hurt your opponent, and maybe even gives away plans. 

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #18

    Baldr

    thejackbauer, if you can move the pieces around to sort of "see what will happen if I do this", then sooner or later one of two things will happen.  Either the pieces will not get moved back to the correct starting squares - or they will get moved back to the correct starting squares but there will be a disagreement about whether that is the correct position.

    So the rule is that you don't touch the pieces unless you are going to move.  If a piece if off-center, you can say "I adjust" and place that piece in the center of it's square.  Other than that, you don't touch your pieces unless you are going to move that piece, and you don't touch your opponennts unless you are going to capture it.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #19

    10curtainj

    ModernCalvin wrote:

    10curtainj

    The points you have covered, including the one in question are rules, not etiquette, meaning that obeying them in mandatory, not optional.

    1. Black gets to choose:

    A. Location of table where the game will be played, if none is assigned by the arbiter.

    B. Board, pieces, and clock to use for the game, if none are provided by arbiter.

    C. Which side of the board the clock is placed on.

    2. If you touch your piece, you must move it (if legal). If you touch an opposing piece, you must capture (if legal). If you do both, then you must follow both rules (if legal). On a side note, it is fun sometimes to touch pawns that cannot move or capture anything . . .

    3. Black starts the clock as soon as the arbiter says the round begins. Period.

    If you break these rules or allow your opponents to break these rules, then one or both of you are cheating! So as other players have said, you did the right thing.

     

    Etiquette is entirely a different matter:

    1. The higher rated player will be the first to offer draw if he or she wants one or feel the position is drawn.

    2. If you offer draw, and your opponent refuses, you let them be the next one to offer draw.

    3. Relative silence between both players during the game.

    4. You should resign in a hopeless position as a sign of respect to your opponent.

    5. You greet your opponent, and shake hands before and/or after the game.

    6. You don't taunt your opponent or mock him or her for blundering or making a mistake.

    These things are optional, but usually followed by experienced chess players.


    Righto cheers

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #20

    10curtainj

    still seems a tiny bit unsportsmanlike...maybe I'm just too soft lol


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